ENG 251: Film and Literature, Fall 2018
Section C2: Thursday, 8:30–11:15 am, G-311
CRN 10917

 

Brian T. Murphy

Bradley Hall, Y-16
516-572-7718

e-mail: brian.murphy@ncc.edu

Schedule and Office Hours
 

 

 

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

 

Description

Objectives

Texts

Policies 

Assignments

 Grading 

Schedule

Links

Important Announcements and Updates: Click HERE
 

Print-friendly (MS Word) course outline here.
Other printable documents:
Model for Evaluation of Student Writing
Revision and Editing Checklist
Essay Outline

“Everyone who sees films based on novels feels able to comment, at levels ranging from the gossipy to the erudite, on the nature and success of the adaptation involved. That is, the interest in adaptation [...] ranges backwards and forwards from those who talk of novels as being ’betrayed’ by boorish film-makers to those who regard the practice of comparing film and novel a waste of time.”

—Brian McFarlane, Novel to Film

 

“On the morrow I announced that I had thought of a story.”

—Mary Shelley, Introduction to the 1831 edition

 

Note: For Fall 2018, ENG 251-C2 is Frankenstein-themed in honor of the 200th anniversary of its publication.
All readings and viewings will be connected to the classic Mary Shelley text and its interpreters.

 

 

DESCRIPTION:
This course compares different techniques and effects of literature and film. Students explore genre, form, structure, symbolism, myth, and convention in both media. Writing is an integral component of the course.

Prerequisites: ENG 102 or ENG 109.

This course explores the complex interplay between film and literature. Selected literary works are analyzed in relation to film versions of the same works in order to gain an understanding of the possibilities—and problems—involved in the transposition to film. As this is a course in literature and film analysis, students do not need to have taken other film courses before taking this course. However, it is assumed that students have successfully completed the prerequisites for this course, ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or their equivalent).  Therefore, students are expected to have the necessary background and experience in analyzing, discussing, and responding to literature, as well as the ability to conduct independent research and to write correctly documented research essays  using MLA format. Students are cautioned that this course requires extensive reading and writing in addition to viewing films and taking part in class discussions. Students not prepared to read (up to 150 pages/week), to write on a regular basis, and to take an active part in class discussions should not consider taking this course.

 

 

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OBJECTIVES:

Course Goals

Learning Outcomes

Writing Literacy: to produce precise, clear,   grammatically-correct, well-developed, and well-organized writing appropriate   to academic, social, and occupational fields

Students will produce coherent texts within common college level forms and revise and improve such texts.

Critical Thinking: to be able to question information and to use reason to determine what to believe or what to do

Students will identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments as they occur in their own and others’ work and develop well-reasoned arguments.

Informational Literacy: to locate, evaluate,   and incorporate relevant source materials into the construction and   expression of an informed point of view

Students will access and utilize basic computer and internet functions, demonstrating appropriate and effective utilization of programs and functions; use basic research techniques, demonstrating appropriate, effective research skills; locate, evaluate, organize, and synthesize information from a variety of sources, demonstrating the ability to implement an effective search strategy to obtain reliable information; and apply ethical and legal standards for use of source information, demonstrating the application of accepted ethical and legal restrictions on the use of published works.

Cultural Literacy: to engage with literary texts that reflect the diversity of the human experience in a variety of historical and cultural framework

Students will recognize the diversity and similarities of the ways in which people in different cultural traditions perceive and experience their lives; demonstrate understanding of the various influences that shape perspectives, values, and identities; and demonstrate understanding of social divisions such as gender, ability, ethnicity, and racial formations in a pluralistic nation and world.

Humanities Competency:

Students are able to analyze or interpret texts, ideas, discourse systems, and the human values they reflect.

Students will

ball2.gif (137 bytes)  Enhance their ability to understand, appreciate, and discuss works of literature through extensive reading and discussion of short stories, novels and plays.

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Analyze works of fiction and drama for plot structure, setting, characterization, theme, and narrative point of view.

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Develop an understanding of critical analysis of film through careful examination of cinematic adaptations of literary texts, focusing on character development, dramatic structure, and performance.

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Learn and utilize the terminology of film analysis, both those terms shared with literary discussion (character, plot, theme, setting) and those specific to cinema (lighting, montage, special effects, etc.).

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Demonstrate an understanding of the possibilities and problems involved in the transposition of literature to film, applying terminology and critical skills acquired during the semester to analyze a cinematic adaptation of a text not discussed in class.

 

 

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TEXT:
(see also Additional Textbook Options, below)

The primary text for this class, Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, will be available at the Nassau Community College bookstore. Although Frankenstein is widely available in several different mass market editions, I have ordered one specific edition, the Norton Critical Edition. This book contains a scholarly introduction, contexts, and criticism, much of which will constitute additional assigned reading for the course. Prices listed at Amazon.com (below) do not include shipping, and are accurate as of posting date only; no guarantees of prices or availability are express or implied§.

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Edited by J. Paul Hunter. New York: W. W. Norton, 2012. ISBN 978-0-393-92793-1 ( Available used starting at $7.57 at Amazon.com***)

Additional  required readings may also be assigned and  will made available as photocopies or as links,.

Recommended:

Hacker, Diana and Nancy Sommers. Rules for Writers, 7 ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2012, or another current college-level handbook including 2009 MLA updates. (Available used starting at $21.35 at Amazon.comhttps://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=briantmurph-20&l=ur2&o=1)
Note: The sixth edition of Rules for Writers with 2009 MLA Updates is also available, and quite a bit less expensive (Available used starting at $14.00 at Amazon.com
https://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=briantmurph-20&l=ur2&o=1).

Monaco, James. How to Read a Film: Movies, Media, and Beyond, Revised 9 ed.. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2009. (Available used starting at $9.00 at Amazon.com)

A good college-level dictionary (Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.comhttp://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=briantmurph-20&l=ur2&o=1).

Additional recommended readings, predominantly critical essays or background information, will be indicated on the schedule (see Outline, below) with an asterisk (*).

 

Recommended additional texts:**

Ackroyd, Peter. The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein. New York: Nan A. Talese, 2010. (Available starting at $14.85 at Amazon.com***)†

Bloom, Harold. How to Read and Why. New York: Scribner, 2000. (Available starting at $1.00 at Amazon.com)***

Cahir, Linda Costanzo. Literature into Film: Theory And Practical Approaches. [New York?]: McFarland, 2006.(Available used starting at $21.84 at Amazon.com)

Casagrande, June. Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite. New York: Penguin, 2006. (Available starting at $3.94 at Amazon.com)

---. Mortal Syntax: 101 Language Choices That Will Get You Clobbered by the Grammar Snobs—Even If You’re Right. New York: Penguin, 2008 (Available used starting at $6.61 at Amazon.com).

Cathcart, Thomas and Daniel Klein. “Logic.” Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar...: Understanding Philosophy Through Jokes. New York: Abrams Image, 2006. 27-49. (Available used starting at $6.73 at Amazon.com)

---. Aristotle and an Aardvark Go to Washington: Understanding Political Doublespeak through Through Philosophy and Jokes. New York: Abrams Image, 2007. 27-49 (Available used starting at $10.85 at Amazon.com).

Corrigan, Timothy, ed. Film and Literature: An Introduction and Reader. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1999. 340-356. (Available starting at $11.00 at Amazon.com)

---. Film and Literature: An Introduction and Reader, 2 ed. [New York?]: Routledge, 2011. (Available used starting at $32.10 at Amazon.com)

Crystal, David. Words, Words, Words. New York: Oxford U P, 2006 (Available used starting at $9.28 at Amazon.com).

Denby, David. Great Books: My Adventures with Homer, Rousseau, Woolf, and Other Indestructible Writers of the Western World. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996. (Available starting at $0.29 at Amazon.com).

Desmond, John M. Adaptation: Studying Film and Literature. Boston/New York: McGraw-Hill, 2005. (Available used starting at $23.00 at Amazon.com)

Dirda, Michael. Classics for Pleasure. Orlando, FL: Harcourt, 2007. (Available starting at $1.49 at Amazon.com)

Foster, Thomas C. How to Read Literature Like a Professor. [New York: Harper, 2008 ?]. (Available used starting at $3.21 at Amazon.comhttp://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=briantmurph-20&l=as2&o=1&a=006000942X)

---. How to Read Novels Like a Professor. New York: Harper, 2008. (Available used starting at $4.51 at Amazon.comhttp://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=briantmurph-20&l=as2&o=1&a=0061340405)

Garvey, Mark. Stylized: A Slightly Obsessive History of Strunk & White’s The Elements of Style. New York: Touchstone/Simon & Schuster, 2009. (Available starting at $14.48 at Amazon.com).

Giannetti, Louis. Understanding Movies, 10 ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2005. (Available starting at $54.00 at Amazon.com)

Gould, Stephen Jay. The Monster’s Human Nature. Dinosaur in a Haystack: Reflections in Natural History. New York: Harmony, 1995. 53-62. (Available starting at $1.70 at Amazon.com***)

Harrison, Stephanie. Adaptations: From Short Story to Big Screen: 35 Great Stories That Have Inspired Great Films. [New York?]: Three Rivers P, 2005. (Available used starting at $8.50 at Amazon.com)

Hoobler, Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler. The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein. New York: Little, Brown, 2006. (Available starting at $0.99 at Amazon.com***)

LaValley, Albert J. "The Stage and Film Children of Frankenstein: A Survey." The Endurance of Frankenstein. Eds. George Levine and U. C. Knoepflmacher. Berkeley: U of California P, 1979. 243-248. (Available starting at $39.95 at Amazon.com***)

Lederer, Richard. Anguished English: An Anthology of Accidental Assaults Upon Our Language. Charleston, SC: Wyrick & Company, 1987 (Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com).

---.  More Anguished English: An Expose of Embarrassing Excruciating, and Egregious Errors in English. New York: Dell, 1994 (Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com).

Levine, George and U. C. Knoepflmacher, eds. The Endurance of Frankenstein. Berkeley: U of California P, 1979. 243-248. (Available starting at $39.95 at Amazon.com***)

Levitin, Daniel J. A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age. New York: Dutton/Penguin, 2016. ( Available new starting at $9.53 at Amazon - cheaper than used!)

McFarlane, Brian. Novel to Film: An Introduction to the Theory of Adaptation. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1996. (Available used starting at $9.99 at Amazon.com)

Mendelsohn, Daniel and Zoe Heller. What Are We Meant to Get Out of Movies Based on Short Stories and Novels?New York Times Sunday Book Review 29 Dec. 2013.

Monaco, James. How to Read a Film: Movies, Media, and Beyond, Revised 9 ed.. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2009. (Available used starting at $9.00 at Amazon.com)

Postman, Neil. Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business. New York: Penguin, 1985, 2005. (Available used starting at $6.74 at Amazon.com).

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein: Classics Illustrated Deluxe Graphic Novels. Adapted by Marion Mousse. New York: Papercutz, 2009. (Available used starting at $3.19 at Amazon.com***).

Truss, Lynne. Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation. New York: Gotham Books, 2004 (Available used starting at $2.70 at Amazon.com).

Seger, Linda. The Art of Adaptation: Turning Fact And Fiction Into Film.  [New York?]: Owl Books, 1992. (Available starting at $1.25 at Amazon.com )

Vankin, Jonathan. Based on a True Story: Fact and Fantasy in 100 Favorite Movies. Chicago: Chicago Review P, 2005. (Available starting at $4.99at Amazon.com)

Wynorski, Jim, ed. They Came from Outer Space: 12 Classic Science Fiction Tales That Became Major Motion Pictures. New York: Doubleday, 1980. ( Available used starting at $8.00 at Amazon.com )

 

 

** Recommended additional texts are not required purchases, and have not been ordered for the course; however, they provide—depending on the course— alternative readings, historical and cultural backgrounds, criticism, personal literary responses, or entertaining (irreverent, possibly sacrilegious) revisions. Students who find themselves becoming deeply interested in one or more of the required readings may find these interesting and/or useful. When indicated with a dagger (†), texts are only provisionally recommended, as I have not read these works yet, although they have received excellent reviews or recommendations.

*** Prices listed at Amazon.com do not include shipping, and are accurate as of original posting date only; no guarantees of prices or availability are express or implied§.

 

 

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POLICIES:

Attendance:
As per the Nassau Community College attendance policy,  “Students are expected to attend all classes. Absences due to illness or for other serious reasons may be excused at the discretion of the instructor. Students are advised that absences in excess of 10% of the total class meetings may result being dropped from the course.”  Students must not only attend every class and lab meeting, but also arrive on time, be prepared, and take an active part in class (see Participation, below); students may be required to sign in each class session to verify their attendance. Excessive absences or latenesses will adversely affect your grade: Students may miss no more than three classes or lab meetings; further absences will result in a reduction of the final grade by one full letter grade for each additional absence. Students unable to attend class should contact the instructor regarding their absence; in addition, students are responsible for submitting all work on time regardless of absences. In addition, once students get to class, they are expected to stay in the classroom until the class is over. Leaving class early or getting up in the middle of class is considered disruptive behavior and should happen only in extreme emergencies.

Classroom Behavior:
Students are expected to be present, prepared, attentive, and active participants in the learning process. As such, any distracting or inappropriate behavior or unauthorized use of electronic devices* is strictly prohibited. Students who wish to use a laptop for note-taking may be allowed to do so at the instructor’s discretion, but will be required to sit in the front row and to submit a copy of their notes to the professor at the end of each class; failure to do so will result in being recorded as absent. Eating, sleeping, texting, or other inappropriate behavior may result in your being asked to leave the class and will adversely affect your final grade. According to the “Student Code of Conduct,” “The College is committed to providing an atmosphere in which students have freedom to learn and engage in the search for truth, knowledge, and reason in accordance with the standards set forth by the academic community. Conduct that adversely affects a student’s responsible membership in the academic community shall result in appropriate disciplinary action.” Appropriate disciplinary action may include but is not limited to probation, suspension, and expulsion from the college. See the Nassau Community College “Classroom Management Policy” and “Student Code of Conduct” in the college catalog.

*On cell phone use in class, see Andrew Lepp, Jacob E. Barkley, and Aryn C. Karpinski. “The Relationship between Cell Phone Use and Academic Performance in a Sample of U.S. College Students.” SAGE Open 19 Feb. 2015.

Plagiarism and Cheating:
Plagiarism includes copying or paraphrasing another’s words, ideas, or facts without crediting the source; submitting a paper written by someone else, either in whole or in part, as one’s own work; or submitting work previously submitted for another course or instructor. Plagiarism, cheating, or other forms of academic dishonesty on any assignment will result in failure (a grade of zero) for that assignment and may result in further disciplinary action, including but not limited to failure for the course and expulsion from the college. See the Nassau Community College policy on “Academic Dishonesty & Plagiarism.”

Homework/Essay Submission:
All writing assignments must be received by the instructor on or before the due date, by the beginning of the class period, as indicated on the schedule, below. Students may also be required to submit an electronic copy of their work via TurnItIn.com; details to be announced. Essays submitted by email will not be accepted, and late work if accepted will be penalized 10% for each day it is late; see below. All at-home work must be typed (in 12-point Times New Roman), double-spaced, with one-inch margins, and stapled when submitted. In-class work must be neatly printed in blue or black ink on loose-leaf composition paper or in bluebooks provided by the instructor and double-spaced§. All essays must also include a proper heading (see Purdue Online Writing Lab’s Formatting and Style Guide), including Word Count; have an appropriate, original title; contain a clear, explicit, assertive, objectively worded thesis statement (thesis statements must be underlined); and (unless otherwise indicated) avoid use of I or you throughout. Finally, all work should be grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, spelling, and documentation, and will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing. Please refer to the Paragraph Outline or Essay Outline and Revising and Editing Checklist for additional assistance.

§  On format, handwriting, and neatness, see Chase, Clinton I. “Essay Test Scoring: Interaction of Relevant Variables.” Journal of Educational Measurement 23.1 (1986): 33-41; and  Marshall, Jon C. and Jerry M. Powers. “Writing Neatness, Composition Errors, and Essay Grades.” Journal of Educational Measurement 6.2 (1988): 306-324.

Make-up Exams/Late Work:
All assignment deadlines and scheduled exam dates are provided at the beginning of the semester; therefore, no make-up opportunities will be offered or late work accepted, except under extraordinary circumstances with appropriate documentation, and late work will be penalized 10% for each day or portion thereof it is submitted after the due date. Note: As all work is due at the beginning of the class period, this includes work submitted after class has begun on the due date.

Excuses such as “crashed computers,” “lost flash drives,” or “empty printer ink cartridges” will not be accepted. All essays or work should be saved both on your computer’s hard drive and again on removable storage device as well as uploaded to cloud storage. (OneDrive, et cetera) Students should also keep backup copies of all work submitted.

*See also,  Mike Adams, “The Dead Grandmother/Exam Syndrome.”

Disabilities and Accommodations:
If you have a physical, psychological, medical, or learning disability that may impact on your ability to carry out the assigned coursework, I urge you to contact the staff at the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD), Building U (516 572-7241), TTY (516) 572-7617. The counselors at CSD will review your concerns and determine to what reasonable accommodations you are entitled as covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. All information and documentation pertaining to personal disabilities will be kept confidential.

Additional Assistance: Students should avail themselves of the Writing Center, located in Bradley Hall (Bldg. Y), 572-7195, and on the second floor of the Library, room L 233, 572-3595. The Writing Center offers one-on-one tutoring as well as workshops. email: wcenter@ncc.edu.

 

 

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ASSIGNMENTS:

ATTENDANCE AND PARTICIPATION (5 %):
As this class will combine both lecture and discussion, students are expected both to attend every session and to take an active part in class—joining in discussions and raising questions. Discussion is one of the best ways to clarify your understandings and to test your conclusions. Open discussion always involves personal exposure, and thus the taking of risks: your ideas may not be the same as your fellow students’ or even the instructor’s. Yet as long as your points are honest and supportable, they need to be respected by all of us in the classroom. Questions, discussion, disagreement, and laughter are all encouraged in this class. (However, ridicule or scoffing is never tolerated.)

QUIZZES (7.5 %):
With the exception of the first day, class may begin with a short (five- to ten-minute) quiz or response paper on the reading(s) for the day, at the instructor’s discretion. Quizzes cannot be made up; if you miss a quiz due to absence or lateness, that grade will be regarded as a 0. At the end of the semester, the lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Total number of quizzes during the semester determines the point value of each; that is, the more quizzes during the semester, the less each individual quiz is worth.

RESPONSE PAPERS (5 @ 10 %):
Students will complete at least five short essays during the semester, on topics to be assigned (see Response Paper Topics, below). Essays must be at least 2-3 pages long (500-750 words), typed, double-spaced, grammatically correct, and submitted on or before the due date indicated on the schedule, below. Essays will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing. Please refer to the Essay Outline and Revision and Editing Checklist.

RESEARCH PAPER (27.5 % total)
Students will also complete an argumentative (persuasive) Research Essay of at least seven to twelve pages (a minimum of 1500-2500 words), using a minimum of five to seven primary or secondary sources (secondary sources must be reliable: scholarly criticism or analysis, not summaries, reviews, or “analysis” from sites such as e-Notes, SparkNotes, Wikipedia*, 123HelpMe, or Gradesaver.com), correctly documented utilizing MLA format (see also Documenting Films in MLA Style), with a cover page and Works Cited page (cover page and Works Cited do not count toward the seven-page requirement). Topics should be selected from a list of suggestions provided (see Research Paper Topics, below), or developed in consultation with the instructor. The research essay will be completed in stages during the semester; points will accrue as follows:

Topic Selection (2.5 %):
Before beginning the research essay assignment, students will develop and submit a clear, well-written, one-page explanation of the topic chosen from the list provided and the reason for selection. This proposal should include a preliminary idea of the plan of the paper, its intention or research question, and a preliminary thesis.

Annotated Bibliography (5 %):
Students will develop and submit an annotated bibliography for the research essay assignment, with a minimum of five to seven sources, correctly documented according to MLA format.

Research Paper: Final Draft (20 %):
The final draft of the research paper must be submitted in a folder, including copies of all sources used and all of the above assignments associated with the research paper.

 

FINAL EXAM (10%):
Students will complete a final exam during the official final exam period, evaluating students’ recognition and comprehension of material studied during the previous weeks. This exam will cover specific texts and films, as well as the principles of cinematic adaptation and critical analysis, and may combine objective questions and short essay answers. Students may be allowed to use notes or textbooks for the essay portion of the exams only.

EXTRA CREDIT (possibly various opportunities, at 1–2 points each):
Students may be notified of opportunities for extra credit during the semester, including attendance at various cultural events related to the class (Recommended Field Trips). If students attend one or more of these events, and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), they can receive additional points: a single event and written response is worth 2 points extra credit; attendance at additional events will earn one additional point each. Note: you may not attend the same events two or more times for additional extra credit!

Note: As a general rule, extra credit only helps if you have already completed all of the assigned work, and will not make up for missing an essay (or two, or three). Extra credit opportunities for Fall 2017 will be announced in class, and they will also be posted here as well as on the class Announcements page, so do not ask at the end of the semester for extra credit to bring your average up.

Extra credit opportunities:

Blackboard Training for Students (1 point)
Dates, Times, and Locations TBA
The Office of Distance Education will be offering on-campus demonstrations for students during the first two weeks of classes this fall, and we are asking you to encourage students to attend so that they can familiarize themselves with Blackboard in order to make their transition to college more manageable.

No advance registration needed; first come, first served basis.

 

Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops (1 point each)
Dates, Times, and Locations TBA
Sentence Building and Avoiding Run-ons, Comma Splices, and Fragments
Using Correct Punctuation: Commas, Semicolons, and Colons
Subject-Verb Agreement, Verb Formation, Tense Usage

The Writing Centers are located in Bradley Hall (Bldg. Y) and on the second floor of the Library, room L233
572-7195 or 572-3595
wcenter@ncc.edu      www.ncc.edu/writingcenter

 

Writing Center MLA Research and Documentation Workshops (1 point)
Dates, Times, and Locations TBA
Topics include:
Locating and Evaluating Sources
Integrating Sources into an Essay
Creating and Formatting a Works Cited List

 

The Writing Centers are located in Bradley Hall (Bldg. Y) and on the second floor of the Library, room L233
572-7195 or 572-3595
wcenter@ncc.edu      www.ncc.edu/writingcenter

Academic Success Workshops and Learning Skills Workshops (1 point each)
NCC Center for Educational and Retention Counseling
Dates, Times, and Locations TBA

Academic Success Workshops

Learning Skills Workshops

For questions, call 516-572-7141
CERC Office, Nassau Hall, M19

Free, but advance registration is required.

 

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GRADING:
 

Final average will be calculated as follows:

Attendance and Class Participation

5 %

Quizzes

7.5 %

Response Papers: 5 @ 10 %

50 %

Research Paper:

27.5 %

Topic Selection (2.5 %)

 

Annotated Bibliography (5 %)

 

Final Draft (20 %)

 

Final Exam

10 %

Total

100 %

Extra Credit (if any) will be added to the final total.

Final average will determine the grade received for the course, as follows:

Final Percentage

Final Grade

90–100+

A

8589

  B+

8084

B

7579

  C+

7074

C

6569

D+

6064

D

059

F

Note: Percentages ending in .5 or greater are rounded up. Therefore, 79.5 rounds to 80, a B, but 79.4 rounds to 79, a C+.

 

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SCHEDULE AND PROJECTED OUTLINE:

 

Important Dates: FALL SEMESTER 2018

Mon. 3 Sep.

Labor Day – COLLEGE HOLIDAY – offices closed

Tue. 4 Sep.

Day, Evening, Weekend College & Distance Education classes begin

Mon. 10 Sep.

Rosh Hashanah – classes do not meet
Last day drop full semester classes without a W grade

Tue. 11 Sep.

Last day drop/add

Tue. 18 Sep.

Day classes meet on a Monday schedule
Evening classes do not meet (classes beginning AFTER 5:01 PM)

Wed. 19 Sep.

Yom Kippur – classes do not meet; COLLEGE HOLIDAY – offices closed

Mon. 24 Sep.

Last day drop full semester classes without a W grade online by 11:59 PM

Tue., 26 Sep.

Evening Activity Hour: 8:30 PM  class will not meet; all other classes follow a regular schedule

Tue. 23 Oct.

Evening Activity Hour: 7:00 PM classes will not meet; all other classes follow a regular schedule

Fri. 9 Nov.

Last day automatic W full semester classes

Sun. 11 Nov.

Veterans’ Day – classes do not meet

Wed. 21 Nov.

Evening classes do not meet (classes beginning AFTER 5:01 PM)

Thu. 22 Nov.

Thanksgiving – COLLEGE HOLIDAY – offices closed

Fri. 23 Nov.

Thanksgiving Recess – COLLEGE HOLIDAY – offices closed

Sat. 24 Nov.

Classes do not meet

Sun. 25 Nov.

Classes do not meet

Tue. 27 Nov.

Evening Activity Hour: 5:30 PM class will not meet; all other classes follow a regular schedule

Thu. 13 Dec.

Evening classes extended by 5 minutes for final exams

Mon. 17 Dec.

Evening classes extended by 5 minutes for final exams

Tue. 18 Dec.

Evening classes extended by 5 minutes for final exams

Wed. 19 Dec.

Evening classes extended by 5 minutes for final exams
Evening classes end

Thu. 20 Dec.

ME Makeup – if necessary EVENING classes will meet

Fri. 21 Dec.

Day, 2nd half semester & Distance Education classes end

Sat. 22 Dec.

MW - Makeup Weekend – if necessary WEEKEND classes will meet

Sun. 23 Dec.

Weekend College classes end

Mon. 24 Dec.

MD Makeup – if necessary DAY classes will meet

Note: All dates subject to change;
See Academic Calendar: Fall 2018 (.pdf)

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Projected Schedule of Readings and Assignments

Note: All readings below are required, and must be completed by the day indicated; the only exceptions are those indicated with an asterisk (*), which are recommended additional readings or resources.

Red text indicates due dates or links to assignments; Blue text indicates links to assignments, resources, or online versions of texts (Note: While every effort is made to verify the accuracy and usefulness of these links and their contents, no guarantees are made. Please notify me of any broken or outdated links at brian.murphy@ncc.edu).

Note: This schedule is subject to revision according to the instructor’s discretion, the Academic Calendar for the semester, school closings due to inclement weather or other reasons, and the progress of the class. Additions or changes will be announced in class, and they will also be posted here as well as on the class Announcements page.

 

NOTE: ONLY FIFTEEN SESSIONS!

 

Date:

 Readings and Assignments

6 Sep..

 

13 Sep.

Response Paper 1 due

20 Sep.

 Response Paper 2 due

27 Sep.

 Response Paper 3 due

4 Oct.

Response Paper 4 due

11 Oct.

 Response Paper 5 due

18 Oct.

 Response Paper 6 due

25 Oct.

Response Paper 7 due

 

1 Nov.

 Response Paper 8 due

8 Nov.

 Response Paper 9 due

15 Nov.

 Response Paper 10 due

22 Nov.

Thanksgiving - College Holiday

29 Nov.

 Response Paper 11 due

6 Dec.

 
Response Paper 12 due

13 Dec.

Response Paper 13 due;
Response Paper 14 due
Final Exam
Research Paper Revisions Due: Final research project, in folder with all ancillary materials

20 Dec.

Final Conferences: Y-16
Day & Distance Education classes end

 

 

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WRITING ASSIGNMENTS:

Response Paper Topics:
For each week, a question or topic will be provided. You may complete any five response papers, but  your response must be on the assigned topic for the week it is submitted, and must be submitted on or before the due date, by the beginning of the class period, or it will receive a zero (0). Late work will not be accepted. Students may complete more than five response papers for extra credit: only the best five scores will be utilized in determining final grades.

Instructions: Respond to each question or topic in a brief, well-developed, coherent, and thoughtful essay of at least two to three pages (500-750 words). Your essay should include independent analysis and demonstrate careful thought, but no research is necessary, nor should any secondary sources be used. This is not a research essay; the only sources utilized or quoted should be the texts themselves. Use of secondary sources, whether credited or not, will be considered grounds for failure. Although these are personal responses, and therefore there is no “correct” answer, remember that they are still formal essays: in your analyses, formulate a clear, explicit, assertive (persuasive), objectively-worded thesis statement, and avoid use of “I” or “you” throughout. Do not attempt to address all aspects of the text, but carefully focus your topic, and avoid merely paraphrasing or summarizing the work. Be sure to support your answers with specific references to the work. Essays must be typed, double-spaced, and grammatically correct; essays will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing.

1) Due 13 Sep.
Choose from one of the following:

2) Due 20 Sep.
Choose from one of the following:

3) Due 27 Sep.

4) Due 4 Oct.

5) Due 11 Oct.

6) Due 18 Oct.

7) Due 25 Oct.

8) Due 1 Nov.

9) Due 8 Nov.

10) Due 15 Nov.

11) Due 29 Nov.

12)  ue 6 Dec.

13) Due 13 Dec.

14) Due 13 Dec.

 

 

Research Paper: Due in stages (see below)
Compose a clear, well-written, properly documented (MLA format) argumentative essay of at least seven to twelve pages (1500-2500 words minimum), with a cover page and Works Cited page (cover page and Works Cited do not count toward the seven-page requirement). The paper must be argumentative (persuasive), with a clear, explicit, and assertive thesis statement, and must use a minimum of five to seven sources, including three to five secondary sources; secondary sources must be scholarly criticism or analysis, not summaries, reviews, or “analysis” from sites such as e-Notes, SparkNotes, Wikipedia*, 123HelpMe, or Gradesaver.com. You must include at least one short quotation, one long—block—quotation, and one paraphrase, and these sources must be properly documented (utilizing MLA format), and integrated into your writing smoothly and correctly. See also Research Paper checklist.

* On use of Wikipedia in college-level research, see Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales on PBS NewsHour, here: “I don't think at a university level it makes sense to cite any encyclopedia in an academic paper. That's just not what an encyclopedia's role is in the research process. Maybe if you're in junior high, you know? If some kid out there is twelve years old and they wrote something and they put in a footnote, we should be thrilled, right? That's his first start on the idea of crediting other people with ideas and things like that, but at the university level? No, it's a bit junior high to cite an encyclopedia.”

Please refer to the following as well:

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Formatting and Style Guide (Purdue Online Writing Lab)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Incorporating Sources (class handout)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Class Plagiarism Policy (on syllabus), as well as the Nassau Community College Policy on Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism (page 63 in the college catalog).

You might also find the following additional resources useful:

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Works Cited page (Instructions & Sample) (Microsoft Word document)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Avoiding Plagiarism (Houghton-Mifflin web site)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Practice Incorporating Sources into Your Work (Houghton-Mifflin web site)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   MLA format (Purdue university's Online Writing Lab)

Topic Selection and Preliminary Thesis: Due Date TBA
You must establish a plan and a clear thesis before you can begin to put together a focused, well-organized, and purposeful research essay. Therefore, as your first step in the research essay assignment, you must develop and submit a clear, well-written, one-page explanation of the topic you have chosen, your reason for the selection, your focus and opinion, and a clear, well-written, explicit, and assertive preliminary thesis. This proposal may also include a preliminary idea of the plan of the paper, its intention or research question. Note: Choose your topic carefully. You will not be allowed to change your topic once you have made your selection, although you may change your position on the particular issue and will, presumably, modify your thesis during the process of research and writing. *Note: Students must obtain prior approval for independent topics; speak to me before or after class or email me to set up an appointment during my office hours.

Your work should take the following form:
Topic: the topic selected from the list provided or one you have developed in consultation with the instructor.
Rationale: why you have chosen to research and write about this particular topic.
Focus: a narrowed form of the subject, and the issue or debate involved.
Opinion: your subjective opinion on the debate or issue.
Thesis: your opinion, worded objectively.

For example:
Topic:
War and Dystopia in Harlan Ellison’s “Soldier Out of Time,” The Terminator, and Terminator 2: Judgment Day (Note: this is not a real topic choice!)
Rationale: I selected this topic because I saw all of the Terminator films and I just heard the newest one will feature Linda Hamilton again. I am curious about how the film versions differ and why, and what relation they all have to the short story.
Focus: How do these works differ in terms of realism and audience appreciation? Is each a true dystopia, or merely an end-of-the-world scenario, and how do we distinguish between the two?
Opinion: I think that while all three are okay, the Terminator films are more interesting for contemporary audiences.
Thesis: While “Soldier Out of Time” is at least innovative and interesting for its time, the movie series captures and expands upon the central conceit of the story  in an entertaining, realistic, and commercially successful manner, despite presenting less of a critique of contemporary society and thus diverging from traditional notions of dystopia.

Topic Choices:

1) :

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2) :

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ball.gif (137 bytes)  “Rise of the Machines”: Computer, Robot, or Cyborg Domination

ball.gif (137 bytes)  and more to come...

As above, your discussion should focus on the significant difference between the interpretations, and how (and why) the socio-cultural milieu of each film creates and reveals these differences.

 

Annotated Preliminary Bibliography: Due Date TBA
You must submit an  annotated preliminary bibliography with a minimum of five to seven sources, correctly cited according to MLA style. This may include up to three primary sources and a minimum of three to five secondary sources; secondary sources must be scholarly criticism or analysis, not summaries, reviews, or “analysis” from sites such as e-Notes, SparkNotes, Wikipedia*, 123HelpMe, or Gradesaver.com; instead, use the library resources, including the available electronic databases such as Academic Search Complete, InfoTrac General OneFile, Lexis-Nexis Academic, Opposing Viewpoints in Context, Points of View Reference Center, and CQ Researcher, to locate appropriate sources. To access the databases from home, click on the individual database link. Then, when prompted, enter your username (N #) and password (PIN). You may also utilize MRQE.com, The Movie Review Query Engine, but be sure to select only professional, reliable reviews: New York Times? Probably okay. JoBlo's Movie Emporium? Not so much.

In addition to a correct citation for each source, you must include a description or summary of the source, at least one paragraph long, and an explanation of how you foresee incorporating it into your essay. For additional information on Annotated Bibliographies, see the Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL)’s Annotated Bibliographies, as well as “Sample Annotated Bibilography” and Ebel, Kimberly, “Class and Gender in Cinderella: Annotated Bibliography.”

You might also find the following additional resources useful:

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   MLA Documentation of Films: Works Cited and In-Text Citations

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Works Cited page (Instructions & Sample) (Microsoft Word document)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   MLA format (Purdue university's Online Writing Lab)

 

Preliminary Draft: Due Date TBA

A finished, typed draft of the completed research essay must be submitted for review, evaluation, and comments. This should be a complete draft of your research essay, using a minimum of three to five secondary sources, five to seven pages, and including both a cover page and Works Cited page. This draft is worth 5% of your final grade; failure to bring the required essay will result in a zero for the assignment.

Note: You do not need to submit the folder containing copies of your sources at this time.

 

Research Paper: Due Date TBA
The final research essay must be submitted, in its folder with all supporting materials: photocopies or printouts of all sources, Topic Selection and Preliminary Thesis, Annotated Preliminary Bibliography, Preliminary Draft, outline–if you have completed one–and any other related materials. Failure to submit the complete folder on the due date will result in a zero for the assignment.

 

 

Final Exam: 15 December

Students will complete a final exam during the official final exam period, evaluating students’ recognition and comprehension of material studied during the previous weeks. This exam will cover specific texts and films, as well as the principles of cinematic adaptation and critical analysis, and may combine objective questions and short essay answers. Students may be allowed to use notes or textbooks for the essay portion of the exams only.

 

 

Back to Top

 

 

Links

 

Grammar, Writing, and Research Papers:

Prentice Hall’s iPractice

Study Guides and Strategies

Patterns for a Purpose

How to Write a Research Paper

Online English Grammar

More on Writing a Research Paper

A Guide to Grammar & Writing

MLA-Style Citations

Another Guide to Grammar and Style

Getting an A on an English Paper

Plagiarism.org

TurnItIn.com

The Grammar Curmudgeon

Society for the Preservation of English Language and Literature

 

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