ENG 220: Mythology and Folklore-Honors, Fall 2019 (CRN 10905)

Section CAH:  Tuesday/Thursday, 8:30–9:45 am
  North Hall, Room 208

Brian T. Murphy

Bradley Hall, Y-16
516-572-7718

e-mail: brian.murphy@ncc.edu

Schedule and Office Hours
 

 

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Description

Objectives

Texts

Policies 

Assignments

 Grading 

Schedule

Links

Important Announcements and Updates: Click HERE

Print-friendly syllabus (.pdf) here.

 

I do not need this, okay? I've got a Master’s degree in Folklore and Mythology!
—Comic Book Guy, “Three Men and a Comic Book.” The Simpsons, episode 7F21

 

DESCRIPTION:
This course is a study of the mythological roots of literature including Greek, Roman, and African mythology, tales from the Bible, and folk material such as ballads, fables, and proverbs. Myths and symbols are traced from their early sources through the 20th century. Writing is an integral component of the course.

SUNY GEN ED-GHUM; NCC GEN ED-GLNW, HUM, LIT

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 103 or ENG 109.

This class will emphasize critical reading and analysis of selected works of mythology and folklore from a variety of cultures and traditions, including works from ancient sources to present-day reinterpretations. Students must have successfully completed the prerequisite for this course, ENG 102 or ENG 109 (or the equivalent). Therefore, students are expected to have the necessary background and experience in analyzing, discussing, and responding to written works, as well as the ability to conduct independent research and to write correctly documented research essays using MLA format. Students are cautioned that this course requires extensive reading, writing, and discussions; students not prepared to read and to write on a regular basis and to take an active part in class discussions should not consider taking this course.

 

OBJECTIVES:

 

Course Goals

Learning Outcomes

Writing Literacy: to produce precise, clear, grammatically-correct, well-developed, and well-organized writing appropriate   to academic, social, and occupational fields

Students will produce coherent texts within common college level forms and revise and improve such texts.

Critical Thinking: to be able to question information and to use reason to determine what to believe or what to do

Students will identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments as they occur in their own and others’ work and develop well-reasoned arguments.

Informational Literacy: to locate, evaluate, and incorporate relevant source materials into the construction of an argument or informed informed point of view

Students will access and utilize basic computer and internet functions, demonstrating appropriate and effective utilization of programs and functions; use basic research techniques, demonstrating appropriate, effective research skills;  locate, evaluate, organize, and synthesize information from a variety of sources on a specific topic to support an argument; and apply ethical and legal standards for use of source information, demonstrating the application of accepted ethical and legal restrictions on the use of published works.  

Cultural Literacy: to engage with literary texts that reflect the diversity of the human experience in a variety of historical and cultural framework

Students will demonstrate understanding of cultural traditions other than European and North American; recognize the diversity and similarities of the ways in which people in different cultural traditions perceive and experience their lives;

Humanities Competency: to understand the conventions and practices of English Studies

Students are able to analyze or interpret texts, ideas, discourse systems, and the human values they reflect.

 

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TEXTS:
Textbooks have been ordered through the NCC Campus Store; however, you are encouraged to purchase or rent them from wherever they are least expensive.
(see also Additional Textbook Options, below)

Required:

Leeming, David. The World of Myth: An Anthology, 3 ed. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2018. 978-0190900137. (Available starting at $22.46 at Amazon.com***)
Note: The second edition of
The World of Myth is also acceptable, and substantially less expensive: $13.00 at Amazon.com***)

NCC College Bookstore prices:

·         Print, new: $30.00

·         Print, used: $22.50

·         Print, new rental: $22.50

·         Print, used rental: $12.00

Supplemental handouts, to be distributed in class.

A good college-level (paperback) dictionary (Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com***).

Recommended:

None of these texts have been ordered through the Campus Store, but we will be reading excerpts from each of them. Required excerpts will be made available online or as printouts, but you may wish to purchase your own copies for further reading. All are available online, on Amazon or other sellers.

Biallas, Leonard J. Myths: Gods, Heroes, and Saviors. Mystic, CT: Twenty-Third Publications, 1986. 978-0896222908 (Available used, starting at $4.93, at Amazon.com***).

Gaiman, Neal. Norse Mythology. Norton, 2017. ISBN 978-0393609097 (Available used, starting at $5.07, at Amazon.com***).

Ovid. Metamorphoses. Trans. A. D. Melville. Introd. E. J. Kenney. Oxford U P, 2009. ISBN 978-0199537372 (Available used, starting at $1.61, at Amazon.com***).

Tolkien, The Silmarillion. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1977. (Available used, starting at $5.43, at Amazon.com***).

You should also have resources for questions of formatting or documentation. In addition to Purdue’s OWL (Online Writing Lab), consider Diana Hacker’s Rules for Writers (Available used starting at $22.00 at Amazon.com***) or another current college-level handbook.

Recommended additional texts:**

General literature, writing, and related topics:

Bloom, Harold. How to Read and Why. New York: Scribner, 2000. (Available starting at $1.00 at Amazon.com***)

Casagrande, June. Grammar Snobs are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite. New York: Penguin, 2006. (Available starting at $3.94 at Amazon.com***)

---. Mortal Syntax: 101 Language Choices That Will Get You Clobbered by the Grammar Snobs—Even If You’re Right. New York: Penguin, 2008 (Available used starting at $6.61 at Amazon.com***).

Crystal, David. Words, Words, Words. New York: Oxford U P, 2006 (Available used starting at $9.28 at Amazon.com***).

Denby, David. Great Books: My Adventures with Homer, Rousseau, Woolf, and Other Indestructible Writers of the Western World. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996. (Available starting at $0.29 at Amazon.com***).

Dirda, Michael. Classics for Pleasure. Orlando, FL: Harcourt, 2007. (Available starting at $1.49 at Amazon.com***)

Foster, Thomas C. How to Read Literature Like a Professor. [New York: Harper, 2008 ?].†

---. How to Read Novels Like a Professor. New York: Harper, 2008.

Kozol, Jonathan. Letters to a Young Teacher. New York: Crown, 2007 (Available starting at $12.15 at Amazon.com***).

---.  The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America. New York: Crown, 2005 (Available starting at $10.17 at Amazon.com***).

Lederer, Richard. Anguished English: An Anthology of Accidental Assaults Upon Our Language. Charleston, SC: Wyrick & Company, 1987 (Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com***).

---. More Anguished English: An Expose of Embarrassing Excruciating, and Egregious Errors in English. New York: Dell, 1994 (Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com***).

Truss, Lynne. Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation. New York: Gotham Books, 2004 (Available used starting at $2.70 at Amazon.com***).

Mythology, Folklore, the Bible, and Backgrounds:

Ackroyd, Peter. Albion: The Origins of the English Imagination. New York: Nan A. Talese, 2002 (Available used starting at $9.49 at Amazon.com).

 ---. The Fall of Troy. New York: Nan A. Talese, 2007.(Available used, starting at $3.96, at Amazon.com ***)†

Alexander, Caroline. The War that Killed Achilles: The True Story of Homer's Iliad and the Trojan War. New York: Viking, 2009. (Available starting at $16.45 at Amazon.com ***).†

Alter, Robert. The David Story: A Translation with Commentary of 1 and 2 Samuel. New York: Norton, 200. (Available used, starting at $11.32, at Amazon.com***).†

---. The Five Books of Moses: A Translation with Commentary. New York: Norton, 2004. (Available used, starting at $21.91, at Amazon.com***).†

Armitage, Simon. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: A New Verse Translation. [New York?]: , 2007.†

Armstrong, Karen. A Short History of Myth. New York: Canongate, 2005. (Available used, starting at $6.23, at Amazon.com***).

Ashe, Geoffrey. The Discovery of King Arthur. New York: Henry Holt, 1985.

---, ed. The Quest for Arthur’s Britain. Chicago: Academy, 1987.

Atwood, Margaret. The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and Odysseus. New York: Canongate, 2006. (Available used, starting at $7.01, at Amazon.com***).

Baricco, Alessandro. An Iliad. Trans. Ann Goldstein. New York: Knopf, 2006. (Available used, starting at $7.69, at Amazon.com***).

Barker, Pat. The Silence of the Girls: A Novel. New York: Doubleday, 2018. (Available starting at $8.03 at Amazon.com***)

Barone, Sam. Dawn of Empire: A Novel. New York: William Morrow, 2007.

Baugh, Albert C. and Thomas Cable. A History of the English Language, 3 ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1978.

Bedard, Tony. “Trojan Horseplay.” DC Meets Looney Tunes. Burbank, CA: DC Comics, 2018. (Available used, starting at $3.74, at Amazon.com***).

Bettelheim, Bruno. The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales. Vintage, 2010. (Available used, starting at 4.00, at Amazon.com***).

Bullfinch, Thomas. The Age of Fable. New York: Harper and Row, 1966. (Available used, starting at $1.00, at Amazon.com***).

Card, Orson Scott. “Atlantis.” Keeper of Dreams. New York: Tom Doherty, 2008

Carson, Anne, trans.  An Oresteia. New York: Faber & Faber, 2009. (Available used, starting at $12.90, at Amazon.com***).†

Chance, Jane. “Grendel’s Mother as Epic Anti-Type of the Virgin and the Queen.” Chapter Seven of Chance, Jane. Woman as Hero in Old English Literature. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse U. P, 1986. 95-108, 131-5. (Reprinted in Fulk, R. D., ed. Interpretations of Beowulf: A Critical Anthology. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana U. P., 1991. 251-263)

Chase, Colin, ed. The Dating of Beowulf. Toronto: U. of Toronto P., 1997.

Crichton, Michael. Eaters of the Dead. New Yrork: Vintage, 2018. (Available starting at $5.37 at Amazon.com***).

Crumb, R., illus. The Book of Genesis. New York: Norton, 2009. (Available starting at $13.69 at Amazon.com***).†

Damrosch, David. The Buried Book: The Loss and Rediscovery of the Great Epic of Gilgamesh. New York: Holt, 2007. (Available starting at $6.88 at Amazon.com***).

Denby, David. Great Books: My Adventures with Homer, Rousseau, Woolf, and Other Indestructible Writers of the Western World. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996. (Available used, starting at $1.37, at Amazon.com***).

Diamond, Jared. Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies. New York: Norton, 1999. (Available used, starting at $8.20, at Amazon.com***).

Dirda, Michael. Classics for Pleasure. Orlando, FL: Harcourt, 2007. (Available starting at $1.49 at Amazon.com***)

Fox, Robin Lane. The Classical World: An Epic History from Homer to Hannibal. 2007. (Available starting at $13.59 at Amazon.com ***)†

Fraser, Rebecca. The Story of Britain: From the Romans to the Present: A Narrative History. New York: W. W. Norton, 2005.

Freeman, Philip. The Philosopher and the Druids: A Journey Among the Ancient Celts. 2006. †

Fulghum, W. B. A Dictionary of Biblical Allusions in English Literature. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1965. (Available used, starting at $3.99, at Amazon.com***).

Fulk, R. D., ed. Interpretations of Beowulf: A Critical Anthology. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana U. P., 1991.

Gardner, John. Grendel. (Available used starting at $0.20 at Amazon.com).

George, Margaret. Helen of Troy. New York: Viking, 2006 (Available used, starting at $17.38, at Amazon.com***).†

Goldstein, Jonathan. Ladies and Gentlemen, The Bible! New York: Riverhead Books, 2009.

Gould, Stephen Jay. I Have Landed: The End of a Beginning in Natural History. New York: Harmony Books, 2002. (Available starting at $1.78 at Amazon.com***)

Graham, Jo. Black Ships. New York: Orbit, 2008. (Available used, starting at $4.01 at Amazon.com***)†

Grossman, David. Lion’s Honey: The Myth of Samson. Trans. Stuart Schoffman. New York: Canongate, 2006 (Available used, starting at $11.10, at Amazon.com***).†

Hadas, Moses, ed. Greek Drama. New York: Bantam, 1983. ISBN 0553212214 (Available used, starting at $0.01, at Amazon.com***).

Hamilton, Edith. Mythology. New York: New American Library, 1969. (Available used, starting at $0.89, at Amazon.com***).

Harari, Yuval Noah. 21 Lessons for the 21st Century. Spiegal & Grau, 2018. (Available used, starting at $8.75, at Amazon.com***).

---. Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow. Harper Collins, 2017. (Available used, starting at $11.49, at Amazon.com***).

---. Sapiens: A Brief History of Mankind. HarperCollins, 2015. (Available used, starting at $9.49, at Amazon.com***).

Hardyment, Christina. Malory: The Knight Who Became King Arthur’s Chronicler. New York: HarperCollins, 2005.

Headley, Maria Dahvana. The Mere Wife. New York: Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, 2018. (Available starting at $17.70 at Amazon.com).

Helms, Randel. Tolkien and the Silmarils. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1981. (Available used, starting at $6.97 at Amazon.com***).

Hinds, Gareth, adapt. and illus. Beowulf [graphic novel]. Cambridge, MA: Candelwick P, 2007. (Available starting at $3.79 at Amazon.com).

Holland, Tom. Persian Fire. New York: Doubleday, 2006. (Available used, starting at $13.79, at Amazon.com***).†

Holland, Tom. Rubicon. New York: Anchor, 2005. (Available used, starting at $8.73, at Amazon.com***).

Homer. The Aeneid. Trans. Robert Fagles. New York: Viking, 2006. (Available used, starting at $18.98, at Amazon.com***).†

---. The Odyssey. Trans. Robert Fagles. Penguin, 1990. ISBN 0140268863 (Available used, starting at $4.99, at Amazon.com***).

Hughes, Bettany. Helen of Troy: Goddess, Princess, Whore. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2005. (Available used, starting at $29.78, at Amazon.com***).

Hunt, Patrick. Ten Discoveries that Rewrote History. New York: Plume, 2007.

Jackson, Kenneth H. “The Arthur of History.” Loomis, ed. 1-11.

Jacobs. A. J. The Year of Living Biblically. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2007.

Kallich, Martin, et al, eds. Oedipus: Myth and Drama. New York: Odyssey Press, 1968. (Available used, starting at $2.99, at Amazon.com***).

Kress, Nancy. “Unto the Daughters.” Sisters in Fantasy. Eds. Susan Schwartz and Martin H. Greenberg. New York: Roc, 1995. Reprinted in A Beaker's Dozen. New York: Tor, 1998. 163-172.

Kocher, Paul H. A Reader’s Guide to The Silmarillion. London: Thames and Hudson, 1981.

LeGuin, Ursula. Lavinia. Orlando, FL: Harcourt, 2008.

Levin, Christopher. The Old Testament: A Brief Introduction. Trans. Margaret Kohl. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton U P, 2005.†

Leyerle, John. “The Interlace Structure of Beowulf.” University of Toronto Quarterly 37 (1967): 1-17. (Reprinted in Fulk, R. D., ed. Interpretations of Beowulf: A Critical Anthology. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana U. P., 1991. 146-167)

Long, Charles H. Alpha: The Myths of Creation.  AAR Classics in Religious Studies Series, Oxford UP, 1983.

Loomis, Laura Hibbard. “Gawain and the Green Knight.” Loomis, ed. 528-540.

Loomis, Roger Sherman, ed. Arthurian Literature in the Middle Ages: A Collaborative History. Oxford: Clarendon, 1959, 2001.

Loomis, Roger Sherman. The Development of Arthurian Romance. New York: Norton, 1963.

Magoun, Francis P. “The Oral-Formulaic Character of Anglo-Saxon Narrative Poetry.” Speculum 28 (1963): 446-67. (Reprinted in Fulk, R. D., ed. Interpretations of Beowulf: A Critical Anthology. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana U. P., 1991. 45-65).

Maine, David. The Book of Samson. New York: St. Martins, 2006. (Available used, starting at $14.07, at Amazon.com***).

---. Fallen. New York: St. Martins, 2005. (Available used, starting at $6.53, at Amazon.com***).

---. The Preservationist. New York: St. Martins, 2004 (published as The Flood in Great Britain). (Available used, starting at $0.01, at Amazon.com***).

Mason, Zachary. The Lost Books of the Odyssey: A Novel. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2010 (Available at Amazon.com for $16.20***).†

Mitchell, Stephen. Gilgamesh: A New English Version. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2004 (Available used, starting at $11.58, at Amazon.com***).†

Morrow, James. Bible Stories for Adults. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1996. (Available used, starting at $1.10, at Amazon.com***).

Nicolson, Adam. God’s Secretaries: The Making of the King James Bible. New York: HarperCollins, 2003. (Available used, starting at $3.70, at Amazon.com***).

Noel, Ruth. The Mythology of Middle Earth. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1977. (Available used, starting at $3.00, at Amazon.com***).

Parry, John Jay and Robert A. Caldwell. “Geoffrey of Monmouth.” Loomis, ed. 72-93.

Pelevin, Victor. The Helmet of Horror: The Myth of Theseus and the Minotaur. Trans. Andrew Bromfield. New York: Canongate, 2006. (Available used, starting at $9.50, at Amazon.com***).†

Philips, Marie. Gods Behaving Badly. Boston: Little, Brown, 2007.

Pinsky, Robert. The Life of David. 2006. (Available used, starting at $7.99, at Amazon.com***).†

Plotz, David. Good Book: The Bizarre, Hilarious, Disturbing, Marvelous and Inspiring Things I Learned When I Read Every Single Word of the Bible. New York: Harper/Harper Collins, 2009.†

Rosenberg, David. Abraham: The First Historical Biography. New York: Basic Books, 2006. (Available used, starting at $0.35, at Amazon.com***).†

---. A Literary Bible: An Original Translation. [New York ?]: Counterpoint, 2009. (Available used starting at $0.86 at Amazon.com***).†

---., and Harold Bloom. The Book of J. New York: Grove Weidenfeld, 1990.(Available used starting at $1.19 at Amazon.com***).†

Saramago, José. Cain. Trans. Margaret Jule Costa. Boston, New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2011. (Available starting at $14.87 at Amazon.com***).

Saramago, José. The Gospel According to Jesus Christ. Boston: Mariner Books, 1994. (Available used starting at $3.79 at Amazon.com***).†

Saylor, Steven. Roma: The Novel of Ancient Rome. New York: St. Martin's, 2007. (Available used starting at $0.29 at Amazon.com***).†

Schweitzer, Darrell. “The Dragons of Eden.” Analog Science Fiction and Fact May 2008: 80-1.

Shanower, Eric. Age of Bronze, Vol. 1: A Thousand Ships. Orange, CA: Image Comics, 2001. (originally published as Age of Bronze issues 1-9).

---. Age of Bronze, Vol. 2: Sacrifice. Orange, CA: Image Comics, 2005. (originally published as Age of Bronze issues 10-19).†

---. Age of Bronze, Vol. 3: Betrayal. Orange, CA: Image Comics, 2007. (originally published as Age of Bronze issues 20-24).†

Swenson, Kristin. Bible Babel: Making Sense of the Most Talked about Book of All Time. New York: Harper Collins, 2010.

Terry, Philip, ed. Ovid Metamorphosed. London: Vintage, 2001. (Available used, starting at $4.95, at Amazon.com***).

Thompson, Ruth Plumly. The Trojan War. Originally published in King Comics Nos. 34, 35, and 36 (January, February and March 1939).

Tóibín, Colm. House of Names: A Novel. New York: Scribner, 2017. (Available used, starting at $11.57, at Amazon.com***).

Tolkien, J. R. R. “Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics.” Proceedings of the British Academy 22 (1936): 245-95. (Reprinted in Fulk, R. D., ed. Interpretations of Beowulf: A Critical Anthology. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana U. P., 1991. 45-65)

---. The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Boerthelm’s Son. Essays and Studies for 1953. reprinted The Tolkien Reader. New York: Ballantine, 1966. 1-27. Also in Poems and Stories. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1994. 75-109.

---., trans. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, and Sir Orfeo. New York: Ballantine, 1975.

Turtledove, Harry and Noreen Doyle, eds. The First Heroes: New Tales of the Bronze Age. New York: Tor, 2004.

Virgil. The Aeneid. Trans. Robert Fitzgerald. Vintage Books, 1990. ISBN 0679729526 (Available used, starting at $3.89, at Amazon.com***).

Wilkinson, Philip and Neil Philip. DK Eyewitness Companions: Mythology. [New York?]: Dorling Kindersley, 2007.†

Winterson, Jeannette. Weight: The Myth of Atlas and Heracles. New York: Canongate, 2006. (Available used, starting at $6.01, at Amazon.com***).†

Wray, T. J. and Gregory Mobley. The Birth of Satan: Tracing the Devil’s Biblical Roots. 2006. (Available used, starting at $5.41, at Amazon.com***).†

Wright, Robert. The Evolution of God. New York and Boston: Little Brown, 2009.   

Zimbardo Rose A. and Neil D. Isaacs, eds. Understanding The Lord of the Rings: The Best of Tolkien Criticism. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2004. . (Available used, starting at $2.49, at Amazon.com***).

 

 

*Note: Many of the individual texts to be read and discussed are available online; these are indicated on the schedule (below) as hyperlinks. However, students are still strongly cautioned that they must purchase the textbook for class use, as well as for the supplemental materials included. Additional materials to be assigned are not included in the books ordered for the class, but may be accessed through the links provided or will be distributed as handouts in class.

** Recommended additional texts are not required purchases, and have not been ordered for the course; however, they provide—depending on the course— alternative readings, historical and cultural backgrounds, criticism, personal literary responses, or entertaining (irreverent, possibly sacrilegious) revisions. Students who find themselves becoming deeply interested in one or more of the required readings may find these interesting and/or useful. When indicated with a dagger (†), texts are only provisionally recommended, as I have not read these works yet, although they have received excellent reviews or recommendations.

*** Prices listed at Amazon.com do not include shipping, and are accurate as of original posting date only; no guarantees of prices or availability are express or implied§.

 

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CLASS POLICIES:

Attendance:
As per the Nassau Community College attendance regulation,  “Students are expected to attend all classes. Absences due to illness or for other serious reasons may be excused at the discretion of the instructor. Students are advised that excessive absences may have a negative impact on their academic performance and/or outcome.” Students must not only attend every class, but also arrive on time, be prepared, and take an active part in class (see Participation, below); students may be required to sign in each class session to verify their attendance. Excessive absences or latenesses will adversely affect your grade: Students may miss no more than three classes; further absences will result in a reduction of the final grade by one full letter grade for each additional absence. Students unable to attend class should contact the instructor regarding their absence; in addition, students are responsible for submitting all work on time regardless of absences. In addition, once students get to class, they are expected to stay in the classroom until the class is over. Leaving class early or getting up in the middle of class is considered disruptive behavior and should happen only in extreme emergencies.

Classroom Behavior:
Students are expected to be present, prepared, attentive, and active participants in the learning process. As such, any distracting or inappropriate behavior or unauthorized use of electronic devices* is strictly prohibited. Students who wish to use a laptop for note-taking may be allowed to do so at the instructor’s discretion, but will be required to sit in the front row and to submit a copy of their notes to the professor at the end of each class; failure to do so will result in a zero for the day, equivalent to being absent. Eating, sleeping, texting, or other inappropriate behavior may result in your being asked to leave the class and will adversely affect your final grade. According to the “Student Code of Conduct,” “The College is committed to providing an atmosphere in which students have freedom to learn and engage in the search for truth, knowledge, and reason in accordance with the standards set forth by the academic community. Conduct that adversely affects a student’s responsible membership in the academic community shall result in appropriate disciplinary action.” Appropriate disciplinary action may include but is not limited to probation, suspension, and expulsion from the college. See the Nassau Community College “Classroom Management Policy“ and “Student Code of Conduct“ in the college catalog.

*On cell phone use in class, see Andrew Lepp, Jacob E. Barkley, and Aryn C. Karpinski. “The Relationship between Cell Phone Use and Academic Performance in a Sample of U.S. College Students.” SAGE Open 19 Feb. 2015;
and Herrera, Tim. “Hide Your Phone When You’re Trying to Work. Seriously.” New York Times (Smarter Living) 2 Dec. 2018.

Plagiarism and Cheating:
Plagiarism includes copying or paraphrasing another’s words, ideas, or facts without crediting the source; submitting a paper written by someone else, either in whole or in part, as one’s own work; or submitting work previously submitted for another course or instructor. Plagiarism, cheating, or other forms of academic dishonesty on any assignment will result in failure (a grade of zero) for that assignment and may result in further disciplinary action, including but not limited to failure for the course and expulsion from the college. See the Nassau Community College policy on “Academic Dishonesty & Plagiarism.”

Homework/Essay Submission:
For each of the assigned essays and projects, a topic or list of topic choices will be provided. Your work must be on one of the assigned topics for that assignment or developed in consultation with the instructor* or it will receive a grade of “F”.

*Note: You must obtain prior approval to write on topics other than those listed below; speak to me before or after class to set up an appointment during my office hours. Approval must be obtained at least one full week in advance of the due date. See details below.

All writing assignments must be received by the instructor on or before the due date, by the beginning of the class period, as indicated on the schedule, below. Students may also be required to submit an electronic copy of their work via TurnItIn.com; details to be announced. Essays submitted by email will not be accepted, and late work if accepted will be penalized 10% for each day it is late; see below. All at-home work must be typed (in 12-point Times New Roman), double-spaced, with one-inch margins, and stapled when submitted. In-class work must be neatly printed in blue or black ink on loose-leaf composition paper or in bluebooks provided by the instructor and double-spaced§. All essays must also include a proper heading (see Purdue Online Writing Lab’s Formatting and Style Guide), including Word Count; have an appropriate, original title; contain a clear, explicit, assertive, objectively worded thesis statement (thesis statements must be underlined); and (unless otherwise indicated) avoid use of I or you throughout. Finally, all work should be grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, spelling, and documentation, and will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing. Please refer to the Paragraph Outline or Essay Outline and Revising and Editing Checklist for additional assistance.

Also, one would think that this would not even need to be stated, but read the work or works about which you are writing, and read them carefully! Do not rely upon your general impressions based on what you think was said in class, or on what you read online. There is no reason for your essays to contain factual errors.

Please feel free to communicate any concerns or questions to me before the essays are due; I will be available to meet with any student who needs assistance or additional instruction. Please speak to me before or after class or email me to set up an appointment during my office hours.

§ On format, handwriting, and neatness, see Chase, Clinton I. “Essay Test Scoring: Interaction of Relevant Variables.” Journal of Educational Measurement 23.1 (1986): 33-41 and
   Marshall, Jon C. and Jerry M. Powers. “Writing Neatness, Composition Errors, and Essay Grades.” Journal of Educational Measurement 6.2 (1988): 306-324.

Make-up Exams/Late Work:
All assignment deadlines and scheduled exam dates are provided at the beginning of the semester; therefore, no make-up opportunities will be offered or late work accepted, except under extraordinary circumstances with appropriate documentation, and late work will be penalized 10% for each day or portion thereof it is submitted after the due date. Note: As all work is due at the beginning of the class period, this includes work submitted on the due date after class has begun.

Excuses such as “crashed computers,” “lost flash drives,” or “empty printer ink cartridges” will not be accepted. All essays or work should be saved both on your computer’s hard drive and again on removable storage device as well as uploaded to cloud storage (OneDrive, et cetera). Students should also keep backup copies of all work submitted.

*See also,  Mike Adams, “The Dead Grandmother/Exam Syndrome.”

Writing Center:
Students should avail themselves of the Writing Center, located in Bradley Hall (Bldg. Y), 572-7195, and on the second floor of the Library, room L 233, 572-3595. The Writing Center offers one-on-one tutoring as well as workshops. email: wcenter@ncc.edu.

Disabilities and Accommodations:
If you have a physical, psychological, medical, or learning disability that may adversely impact your ability to carry out the assigned coursework, contact the staff at the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD) in Building U: 572-7241, TTY 572-7617. CSD will review your concerns and determine with you what accommodations are necessary and appropriate. All information and documentation are confidential.

 

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ASSIGNMENTS:

Attendance and Participation (7.5%):
As this class will combine both lecture and discussion, students are expected both to attend every session and to take an active part in class—joining in discussions and raising questions. Discussion is one of the best ways to clarify your understandings and to test your conclusions; therefore, it is imperative that all students participate regularly in order that we may together discover what each selection “means” to us. Open discussion always involves personal exposure, and thus the taking of risks: your ideas may not be the same as your fellow students’ or even the instructor’s. Yet as long as your points are honest and supportable, they will be respected by all of us in the classroom. Questions, discussion, disagreement, and laughter are all encouraged in this class (However, ridicule or scoffing is never tolerated).

Quizzes (7.5%):
With the exception of the first day, class may begin with a short (five- to ten-minute) quiz or writing assignment on the reading(s) for the day, at the instructor’s discretion. Quizzes missed due to tardiness may not be made up. At the end of the semester, the lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Total number of quizzes during the semester will determine the point value of each; that is, if sixteen quizzes are given (lowest quiz grade will be dropped), each quiz is worth roughly one-half point.

Response Papers (10 @ 5%):
Students will complete at least ten of the weekly response papers during the semester, on topics to be assigned. (See Response Paper Topics, below). Respond to each question or topic in a brief, well-developed, coherent, and thoughtful short essay of two to three pages (500-750 words). Your essay should include independent analysis and demonstrate careful thought, but no research is necessary, nor should any secondary sources be used. This is not a research essay; the only sources utilized or quoted should be the texts themselves. Use of secondary sources, whether credited or not, will be considered grounds for failure. Although these are personal responses, and therefore there is no “correct” answer, remember that they are still formal essays: in your analyses, formulate a clear, explicit, assertive (persuasive), objectively worded thesis statement, and avoid use of “I” or “you” throughout. At least one response paper will be shared with the class as a short (five-minute) presentation, ideally one that is open-ended, leading into class discussions with questions, major themes, or topics for further thought. Handouts, visual aids, or multi-media presentations are not required, but certainly allowed.

Students may complete more than ten response papers for extra credit: only the best ten scores will be utilized in determining final grades.

Research Paper/Final Project (35% total)
Students will also complete a major semester project or argumentative (persuasive)
Research Essay of at least seven to twelve pages (a minimum of 1500-2500 words), using a minimum of five to seven primary or secondary sources (secondary sources must be reliable: scholarly criticism or analysis, not summaries, reviews, or “analysis” from sites such as e-Notes, SparkNotes, Wikipedia*, 123HelpMe, or Gradesaver.com), correctly documented utilizing MLA format, with a cover page and Works Cited page (cover page and Works Cited do not count toward the seven-page requirement). Topics should be selected from a list of suggestions provided (see Research Paper Topics, below), or developed in consultation with the instructor. The project will be completed in stages during the semester; points will accrue as follows:

Proposal/Topic Selection (2.5%): Before beginning the assignment, students will develop and submit a clear, well-written, one-page explanation of the topic chosen from the list provided and the reason for selection. This proposal should include a preliminary idea of the plan of the paper, its intention or research question, and a preliminary thesis.

Annotated Bibliography (5%): Students will develop and submit an annotated bibliography for the research essay assignment, with a minimum of five to seven sources, correctly documented according to MLA format.

Preliminary Draft (2.5%): Students will submit a finished, typed draft of the completed research essay for review, evaluation, and comments.

Presentation (5%): Students will present to the class a summary and explanation of their final project or research essay.

Final Draft (20%): The final draft of the research paper or project must be submitted in a folder, including copies of all sources used and all of the above assignments associated with the research paper.

Extra Credit (various opportunities, at 1–2 points each):
Students may be notified of opportunities for extra credit during the semester, including attendance at various workshops or cultural events related to the class (Recommended Field Trips”). If students attend one or more of these events, and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), they can receive additional points: a single event and written response is usually worth 2 points extra credit; attendance at additional events will earn one additional point each.

Note: As a general rule, extra credit only helps if you have already completed all of the assigned work, and will not make up for missing an essay (or two, or three). Extra credit opportunities will be announced in class, and they will also be posted here as well as on the class Announcements page, so do not ask at the end of the semester for “extra creditto bring your average up. Students asking for extra points or changes to their grade may have their grade reduced, instead.

Extra credit opportunities to date:

 

College Night at the Morgan Library and Museum

Students are invited to an after-hours event featuring exhibition tours, games, behind-the-scenes experiences, sketching with Drawing New York, live music, and more!

Our fall season exhibitions include, John Singer Sargent: Portraits in CharcoalIllusions of the Photographer: Duane Michals at the MorganVerdi: Creating Otello and Falstaff—Highlights from the Ricordi Archive, and Guercino: Virtuoso Draftsman.

Thursday, November 14, 2019, 6–8 p.m.

Tickets: Free for college students with a valid school ID.

RSVP here.

https://www.themorgan.org/programs/free-college-night

 

The Lightning Thief
Longacre Theater,
220 W 48th St,
New York, NY 10036

20 September 2019―5 January 2020
(Opens 16 Oct. 2019)

Ticket prices and schedule not yet available.

 

Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops (1 point each)
Topics include:
Sentence Building and Avoiding Run-ons, Comma Splices, and Fragments
Using Correct Punctuation: Commas, Semicolons, and Colons
Subject-Verb Agreement, Verb Formation, Tense Usage

Dates, Times, and Locations TBA

The Writing Centers are located in Bradley Hall (Bldg. Y) and on the second floor of the Library, room L233
572-7195 or 572-3595
wcenter@ncc.edu      www.ncc.edu/writingcenter

 

Writing Center MLA Research and Documentation Workshops (1 point)
Topics include:
Locating and Evaluating Sources
Integrating Sources into an Essay
Creating and Formatting a Works Cited List

Dates, Times, and Locations TBA

 

Academic Success Workshops and Learning Skills Workshops (1 point each)
NCC Center for Educational and Retention Counseling

IT'S "ABOUT TIME"
MANAGING, TIME. SELF & COLLEGE
October 15
11:30
AM―12:45 PM
G 109

Learning Skills Workshops
It is RECOMMENDED that students attend all five of the following

Listening/Note-Taking
October 22
11:30
AM―12:45 PM
G 109

Studying and Organizing for Classes
October 29
11:30
AM―12:45 PM
G 109

Reading College Textbooks
November 5
11:30
AM―12:45 PM
G 121

Test-Taking
November 12
11:30
AM―12:45 PM
G 109

Managing Test Anxiety
November 19
11:30
AM―12:45 PM
G 109

For questions, call 516-572-7141
CERC Office, Nassau Hall, M19

 

 

 

 

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GRADING:

Final grades will be determined as follows:

Attendance and Class Participation

7.5%

Quizzes

7.5%

Response Papers: 10 @ 10%

50%

Research Paper/Project:

35%

Proposal/Topic Selection (2.5%)

Annotated Bibliography (5%)

 

Preliminary Draft (2.5%)

 

Presentation (5%)

 

Final Draft (20 %)

 

Extra Credit (if any) will be added to the final total.

Total Points earned (Final Average) will determine the grade received for the course, as follows:

Final Percentage

Final Grade

90–100+

A

8589

  B+

8084

B

7579

  C+

7074

C

6569

D+

6064

D

059

F

Note: Percentages ending in .5 or greater are rounded up.
Therefore, 79.5 rounds to 80, a B, but 79.4 rounds to 79, a C+.

 

 

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SCHEDULE AND PROJECTED OUTLINE

 

IMPORTANT DATES: FALL SEMESTER 2019

Mon., 2 Sept.

Labor Day: Classes do NOT meet

Tues., 3 Sept.

DAY, EVENING, and ONLINE EDUCATION classes begin

Fri., 6 Sept.

WEEKEND classes begin and

Mon., 9 Sept.

Last day to Drop/Add

Mon., 23 Sept.

Last day to drop full semester classes without a W grade

Mon., 30 Sept.

Rosh Hashanah: Classes do NOT meet

Tues., 8 Oct.

DAY classes meet on a Monday schedule;
EVENING classes do not meet

Wed., 9 Oct.

Yom Kippur: Classes do NOT meet

Mon., 11 Nov.

Veterans’ Day: Classes do NOT meet

Wed., 27 Nov.

EVENING classes do not meet

Thurs., 28 Nov.

Thanksgiving Day: Classes do NOT meet

Fri., 29 Nov.―Sun., 1 Dec.

Classes do NOT meet

Fri., 8 Nov.

Last day automatic W

Thurs., 12 Dec.

EVENING classes extended by 5 minutes for final exams

Sun., 15 Dec.

WEEKEND classes end

Tues., 17 Dec.

EVENING classes extended by 5 minutes for final exams

Wed., 18 Dec.

EVENING classes extended by 5 minutes for final exams

Thurs., 19 Dec.

EVENING classes do not meet
Makeup Evening – If necessary, EVENING classes meet.

Fri., 20 Dec.

EVENING classes do not meet (Friday night Weekend College).

Sat., 21 Dec.

Makeup Weekend – If necessary, WEEKEND classes meet.

Sun., 22 Dec.

Classes do NOT meet

Mon., 23 Dec.

EVENING classes extended by 5 minutes for final exams;
DAY, EVENING, and ONLINE EDUCATION classes end

Tues., 24 Dec.

Makeup Day – If necessary, DAY classes meet

NOTE: ALL DATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE;
SEE
ACADEMIC CALENDAR: FALL 2019

 

 

Readings and Assignments:
Readings
from The World of Myth: An Anthology and required additional readings are identified below by title and page numbers, e.g., Leeming  “The Pantheons” (89-115), Gaiman, “Before the Beginning, and After” in Norse Mythology (27-35, Handout). All readings below are required and must be completed by the class indicated; the only exceptions are those indicated with an asterisk (*), which are recommended additional readings or resources. Additional readings may also be assigned. Viewings include select online resources and may be shown in class or can be viewed at home. To access streaming videos from home, click on the individual link. Then, when prompted, enter your username (N #) and password (PIN).

Red text indicates important dates or links to assignment descriptions; Blue text indicates links to assignments, resources, or online versions of texts. (Note: While every effort is made to verify the accuracy and usefulness of these links and their contents, no guarantees are made. Please notify me of any broken or outdated links).

Note: This schedule is subject to revision according to the instructor’s discretion, the Academic Calendar for the semester, school closings due to inclement weather or other reasons, and the progress of the class. Additions or changes will be announced in class, and they will also be posted here as well as on the class Announcements page.

Date:

 Readings and Assignments:

 

 Labor Day: College Closed

Tue., 3 Sep.

 Day, Evening & Distance Education (online) Classes Begin

 Course Introduction: Syllabus, texts, policies, assignments

Thu., 5 Sep.

 What Is Myth?

 Readings:

 Leeming, “Introduction: The Dimensions of Myth” (1-8); Biallas, “Myth and Religion” (15-38, Handout)

 *Recommended additional readings:

  Harari, Yuval Noah. “The Law of Religion.” Sapiens: A Brief History of Mankind. HarperCollins, 2015: 209-236.

Viewings: TBA

 Response Paper 1 due

Tue., 10 Sep.

Cosmogony and Creation Myths: Beginnings

 Readings:

 Leeming, “The Creation” (15-42)

 Gaiman, “Before the Beginning, and After” in Norse Mythology (27-35, Handout)

 Tolkien, “Ainulindalë: The Music of the Ainur“ in The Silmarillion (13-22, Handout)

 *Recommended additional readings:

  Foster and Cummings, “The Story of the Beginning“ in Asgard Stories: Tales from Norse Mythology

  Helms, Randel. “The Major Themes: Mythology in The Silmarillion.” Tolkien and the Silmarils. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1981: 21-40.

  Lewis, Mesopotamian Cosmology and Mythology

  Milton, John. Paradise Lost Book 7

  Spence, “The Making of the World and of Man (Cosmogony)“ in An Introduction to Mythology

 *Complete versions of select texts excerpted in Leeming:

  Genesis 1, 2

  Enuma Elish, the Babylonian creation myth

  Creation Legend of Sun Worshippers, an Egyptian creation myth
 
Gylfaginning: The Beguiling of Gylfi” from The Prose Edda of Snorri Sturlson

 

 Viewings:

 Stephen Greenblatt, “The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve”

 “The Babylonian Creation Story” (30:41) Episode 14 of Great Mythologies of the World, The Great Courses

 “African Creation Stories” (28:53) Episode 26 of Great Mythologies of the World, The Great Courses

 Tolkien's Creation Myth (03:01)

Thu., 12 Sep.

 Cosmogony and Creation Myths: Beginnings, cont.

 Response Paper 2 due

Tue., 17 Sep.

 Cosmogony and Creation Myths: Creation and Fall of Man

Readings:

 Leeming, “Prometheus” and “Pandora” (171-174)

 Genesis 3, 5

 Hesiod, Works and Days ll. 1-201, esp. 106-201

 Ovid, Metamorphoses I (through “The Iron Age”)

 The Epic of Atraḥasis, ll. 1-247

*Recommended additional readings:

  Mark, Joshua J “The Atrahasis Epic: The Great Flood and the Meaning of Suffering.”

Thu., 19 Sep.

 Cosmogony and Creation Myths: Creation and Fall of Man, cont.

 Response Paper 3 due

Mon., 23 Sep.

 Last day to drop without W grade

Tue., 24 Sep.

Pantheons

 Readings:

 Leeming, “The Pantheons” (89-115)

 Tolkien, “Valaquenta“ in The Silmarillion (23-32, Handout)

 *Recommended additional readings:

  The Descent of the Gods“ and “Stories of Gods and Heroes: Introduction“ in Bulfinch's Mythology

 Viewings: TBA

*See also: Stephen Colbert and James Franco: Tolkien Showdown.

Thu., 26 Sep.

 Pantheons, cont.

 Response Paper 4 due

Proposal/Research Topic Due

Tue., 1 Oct.

  Pantheons, cont.

Thu., 3 Oct.

 Flood Narratives

 Readings:

 Leeming, “The Flood” (43-70)

 The Epic of Atraḥasis, ll. i.b135-iii.d7

 Tolkien, “Akallabêth: The Downfall of Númenorin The Silmarillion (257-282, Handout)

 *Recommended additional readings:

  The Great Flood.” Livius.org

  Helms, Randel. “Reading Akallabêth.Tolkien and the Silmarils. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1981: 64-72.

  Mark, Joshua J “The Atrahasis Epic: The Great Flood and the Meaning of Suffering.”

  Morrow, James. “Bible Stories for Adults, No. 17: The Deluge.” Bible Stories for Adults. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1996. 1-14.

 Viewings:

 Flood Stories and Myths (02:56)

 Mesopotamian Flood Myths (05:41)

 Tales of Flood and Fire” (31:25): Episode 24 of Great Mythologies of the World, The Great Courses

 *See also:

  Donovan, “Atlantis

Thu., 10 Oct.

 Flood Narratives, cont.

 Response Paper 5 due

Tue., 8 Oct.

 DAY classes meet on a Monday schedule;
 EVENING classes do not meet

Tue., 15 Oct.

 Flood Narratives, cont.

Thu., 17 Oct.

 Trickster Tales

 Readings:

 Leeming, “The Trickster” (156-168); Biallas, “Tricksters” (88-109, Handout)

 Viewings:

 Tricksters of Africa” (30:34): Episode 28 of Great Mythologies of the World, The Great Courses

 Native American Tricksters” (31:24): Episode 57 of Great Mythologies of the World, The Great Courses

 Response Paper 6 due

Tue., 22 Oct.

 Trickster Tales, cont.

Thu., 24 Oct.

 Trickster Tales: Brer Rabbit and Bugs Bunny

 Readings:

 Uncle Remus and Brer Rabbit

 *“Background Reading (Uncle Remus and Br'er Rabbit)

 *“Bugs Bunny: The Trickster, American Style.” Weekend Edition Sunday. NPR. (6 Jan. 2008): Read transcript/Listen.

Viewings:

 Fresh Hare” (1942)

 The Wabbit Who Came to Supper” (1942)

 Case of the Missing Hare” (1942)

 The Wacky Wabbit” (1942)

 What’s Opera, Doc? (1957)

 Rabbit Fire (1951)

 Response Paper 7 due

Tue., 29 Oct.

 Hero Tales and the Heroic Quest

 Readings:

 Leeming, “Hero Myths” (203-269);  Biallas, “The Heroic Task“ (159-182, Handout)

 *Recommended additional readings:

  Flieger, Verlyn. “Frodo and Aragorn: The Concept of the Hero.” Understanding The Lord of the Rings: The Best of Tolkien Criticism. Eds. Rose A. Zimbardo and Neil D. Isaacs. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2004. 122-145.

 Viewings:

 “The World’s Oldest Myth: Gilgamesh” (32:08): Episode 13 of Great Mythologies of the World, The Great Courses

  Response Paper 8 due

Thu., 31 Oct.

 Hero Tales and the Heroic Quest, cont.

Annotated Bibliography Due

Tue., 5 Nov.

 Hero Tales and the Heroic Quest, cont.

 Readings:

 The Quest of the Holy Grail (excerpts), trans. W.W. Comfort (Handout); full version here.

*See also, Echard, Siân. “The Quest for the Holy Grail“ (pictorial)

*Recommended additional readings:

Foulon, Charles. “Wace.” Loomis, ed. 94-103.

Jackson, Kenneth H. “The Arthur of History.” Loomis, ed. 1-11.

Loomis, Laura Hibbard. “Gawain and the Green Knight.” Loomis, ed. 528-540.

Loomis, Roger Sherman, ed. Arthurian Literature in the Middle Ages: A Collaborative History. Oxford: Clarendon, 1959, 2001.

---. “Layamon’s Brut.” Loomis, ed. 104-111.

---. “The Oral Diffusion of the Arthurian Legend.” Loomis, ed. 52-63.

Parry, John Jay and Robert A. Caldwell. “Geoffrey of Monmouth.” Loomis, ed. 72-93.

Tolkien, J. R. R., trans. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, and Sir Orfeo. New York: Ballantine, 1975.

 Response Paper 9 due

Thu., 7 Nov.

 Hero Tales and the Heroic Quest, cont.

 Viewings:

 John Boorman’s Excalibur

 *Excalibur (1981) - An Esoteric Analysis

 *Excalibur: Behind the Movie | PBS America

 Response Paper 10 due

Fri., 8 Nov.

 Last Day Automatic W

Tue., 12 Nov.

 Hero Tales and the Heroic Quest, cont.

John Boorman’s Excalibur, cont.

Thu., 14 Nov.

 Ragnarök and Apocalypse

 Readings:

 Leeming, “The Apocalypse” (71-85)

 Gaiman, “Ragnarök: The Final Destiny of the Gods” in Norse Mythology (267-281, Handout)

 *Recommended additional readings:

   Foster and Cummings, “The Twilight of the Gods“ in  Asgard Stories: Tales from Norse Mythology

   Keary and Keary, “Ragnarök, or, The Twilight of the Gods“ in The Heroes of Asgard: Tales from Scandinavian Mythology

 Viewings: TBA

Tue., 19 Nov.

 Ragnarök and Apocalypse, cont.

 Response Paper 11 due

Thu., 21 Nov.

 Ragnarök and Apocalypse, cont.

Tue., 26 Nov.

 Ragnarök and Apocalypse, cont.

 Response Paper 12 due

Thu., 28 Nov.

 Thanksgiving Day: Classes do NOT meet

Tue., 3 Dec.

 Folklore, Kinder- and Hausmärchen, and Fairy Tales

 Readings:

 Tolkien, “On Fairy Stories(Handout)

 Shultz, David. “Some Fairy Tales May Be 6000 Years Old.” ScienceMag.org. AAAS. 22 Apr. 2016.

 Viewings: TBA

  *Recommended additional readings:

  Bettleheim, Bruno. “Fairy Tale versus Myth: Optimism versus Pessimism” and “Fear of Fantasy: Why Were Fairy Tales Outlawed?The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales. Knopf, 1976. 35-41, 116-123.

  Pagel, Mark. “Anthropology: The Long Lives of Fairy Tales.” Current Biology 26.7 (4 Apr. 2016): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2016.02.042.

 

 Response Paper 13 due

 Research Paper Due: Typed, finished draft for comments and suggestions

Thu., 5 Dec.

 Folklore, Kinder- and Hausmärchen, and Fairy Tales, cont.

 Cinderella: A Case Study (Handout)

 Readings (six different versions of the story):

 Charles Perrault, “Cinderella 

 Catherine-Maire d'Aulnoy, “Finette Cendron

 Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm, “Ashputtle” (a slightly edited version) 

 Tuan Ch'êng-shih, “Yeh-Hsien (A Chinese 'Cinderella')

 The Maiden, the Frog, and the Chief's Son (An African 'Cinderella')

 Oochigeaskw—The Rough-Faced Girl (A Native American 'Cinderella')

 Grant, Campbell, adapter. “Walt Disney's 'Cinderella'

 Sexton, Anne. “Cinderella

 *Bonnie Cullen, “The Rise of Perrault's 'Cinderella'”

 Bruno Bettleheim, “'Cinderella': A Story of Sibling Rivalry and Oedipal Conflicts.” The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales. Knopf, 1976. 236-277.

 *Elisabeth Panttaja, “Cinderella: Not So Morally Superior”

 Jane Yolen, “America's 'Cinderella.'“ (Children's Literature in Education 8.1 (1970): 21-29.) (in .pdf)

 Rafferty, Terrence. “The Better to Entertain You With, My Dear.” New York Times 25 March 2012

 

 *See also, The Cinderella Bibliography (U of Rochester)

 

  *Recommended additional readings:

   Bettleheim, Bruno. “Fairy Tales and Modern Stories.”

   Orenstein, Peggy. Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture. New York: Harper, 2012.

   ---.  Fairy Tales and a Dose of Reality.”

   ---.  “Cinderella and the Princess Culture.”

  Poniewozik, James. “The Princess Paradox.”

  Schectman, Jacqueline M. “‘Cinderella’ and the Loss of Father-Love.”

  Tatar, Maria. “An Introduction to Fairy Tales.”

  Thompson, Stith. “Universality of the Folktale.”

  Wilson, Margot. The Truth About Cinderella: A Darwinian View of Parental Love. Yale UP, 1999.

Tue., 10 Dec.

 Folklore, Kinder- and Hausmärchen, and Fairy Tales, cont.

  Response Paper 14 due

Thu., 12 Dec.

 Folklore, Kinder- and Hausmärchen, and Fairy Tales, cont.

Tue., 17 Dec.

 Presentations: Final Projects

 Research Paper Revisions Due (Final research project, in folder with all ancillary materials)

Thu., 19 Dec.

 Presentations: Final Projects, cont.
 Final Conferences

Mon., 23 Dec.

 Day, Evening, & Distance Education Classes End

 

 

 

 

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WRITING TOPICS AND GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS:

For each of the writing assignments, a topic or list of topic choices is provided. Your essay must be on one of the assigned topics for that assignment or developed in consultation with the instructor. All essays must be submitted on or before the due date, by the beginning of the class period; late work will not be accepted.

Be sure to focus carefully on the topic: formulate a strong, objectively worded thesis, and avoid plot summary. Remember that these are formal essays: they must have an appropriate, original title; contain an introduction, body, and conclusion; have a clear, explicit, assertive, objectively worded thesis statement; and avoid use of “I” or “you” throughout. See Jack Lynch’s “Getting an A on an English Paper“ at http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/EngPaper/, especially “The Thesis“ and “Close Reading.”

Also, one would think that this would not even need to be stated, but read the work or works about which you are writing, and read carefully! Do not rely upon your general impressions based on what you think was said in class, or on what you read online. There is no reason for your essays to contain factual errors.

Please feel free to communicate any concerns or questions to me before assignments are due; I will be available to meet with any student who needs assistance or additional instruction. Please speak to me before or after class or email me to set up an appointment during my office hours.

 

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RESPONSE PAPER TOPICS:
For each week, a question or topic will be provided. You may complete any ten response papers, but  your response must be on the assigned topic for the week it is submitted, and must be submitted on or before the due date, by the beginning of the class period, or it will receive a zero (0). Late work will not be accepted. Students may complete more than ten response papers for extra credit: only the best ten scores will be utilized in determining final grades.

Instructions: Respond to each question or topic in a brief, well-developed, coherent, and thoughtful essay of at least two to three pages (500-750 words). Your essay should include independent analysis and demonstrate careful thought, but no research is necessary, nor should any secondary sources be used. This is not a research essay; the only sources utilized or quoted should be the texts themselves. Use of secondary sources, whether credited or not, will be considered grounds for failure. Although these are personal responses, and therefore there is no “correct” answer, remember that they are still formal essays: in your analyses, formulate a clear, explicit, assertive (persuasive), objectively-worded thesis statement, and avoid use of “I” or “you” throughout. Do not attempt to address all aspects of the text, but carefully focus your topic, and avoid merely paraphrasing or summarizing the work. Be sure to support your answers with specific references to the work. Essays must be typed, double-spaced, and grammatically correct; essays will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing.

1)  Choose from one of the following:

A. In “Why Mythology Is Still Important Today,” Bryan N. Griffin, Jr., states, “For one thing, it makes up a major part of anybody’s heritage.  It is a constant reminder of who we are and where we come from....But the reason why mythology is still important is that it is pure storytelling. Everybody either likes to tell a good story or listen to someone tell a good story.” Heritage and story-telling: are these adequate reasons to study mythology? Why read and study mythology? What is its value, be it in our current socio-cultural milieu, or ever?

B. Joseph Campbell, in The Power of Myth, makes the following recommendation: “Read other people's myths, not those of your own religion, because you tend to interpret your own religion in terms of facts―but if you read the other ones, you begin to get the message” Other than the obvious, what might Campbell mean when he refers to “your own religion,” and what myths do we accept as truths?

2)  According to Leeming (16), Charles Long’s Alpha: The Myth of Creation identifies five archetypes of creation: ex nihilo, chaos, world parent, emergence, and earth diver creation myths. As we look at the creation myths from numerous cultures and different eras, we do see that certain themes or elements repeat, and that these categories, while overlapping, do apply, at least to those discussed by Leeming. Why do so many different cultures share these common motifs or ideas? That is, what does this indicate about the nature of myths or about humans and human culture?

3)  Many cultures present humanity as somehow “fallen”; that is, inferior to Primordial Man or the original created beings from whom we are literally and figuratively “descended.” Consider the story of Adam and Eve’s fall and expulsion from Eden, the sequence of ages in the Works and Days of Hesiod or the Metamorphoses of Ovid, and others. Why is the focus on entropy or devolution so common, and how does it reflect the purpose(s) of mythology as discussed by Leeming, Biallas, and others?

4)  Choose from one of the following:

A. David Leeming suggests that the pantheon of a culture “reflect[s] that culture’s value system and view of itself” (89); furthermore, it could also be argued that these pantheons also shape cultural norms and beliefs. Consider at least two or three of the different pantheons presented in the text, and contrast the cultural mores or values suggested by them.

B. Apply what you have learned concerning the role of mythological pantheons in both shaping and reflecting culture to a non-traditional “pantheon”; for example, consider the original Avengers or Justice League, or the main crew of Star Trek: The Next Generation, the Castaways on Gilligan’s Island

5)  Flood Narratives

6)  Trickster Tales

7)  Trickster Tales: Brer Rabbit and Bugs Bunny

8)  Hero Tales and the Heroic Quest: The Hero

9)  Hero Tales and the Heroic Quest: The Quest

10)  Hero Tales and the Heroic Quest: The Holy Grail

11)  Ragnarök and Apocalypse:

12)  Ragnarök and Apocalypse:

13)  According to Bruno Bettleheim, in The Uses of Enchantment, “Each fairy tale is a magic mirror which reflects some aspects of our inner worlds, and of the steps required by our evolution from immaturity to maturity” (309). Other than “Cinderella,” is this true of fairy tales in general? If so, is it somehow more true of fairy tales than of other forms of literature?

 

14) Consider the way in which the various versions of the Cinderella story present a society and its cultural values and beliefs.  What purpose and/or effect do these values and beliefs have? Focus especially on how men and women are depicted in each version: what norms or standards are presented for each gender, and how do these represent or reflect the texts’ socio-cultural milieu?

 

 

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FINAL PROJECT/RESEARCH PAPER: Due in stages (see below)
Students will complete either an independent creative or scholarly project (see topics
4 and 5, below) or  a traditional research essay of at least seven to twelve pages (1500-2500 words minimum), with a cover page and Works Cited page (cover page and Works Cited do not count toward the seven-page requirement). The paper must be argumentative (persuasive), with a clear, explicit, and assertive thesis statement, and must use a minimum of five to seven sources, up to three primary sources and a minimum of three to five secondary sources. Secondary sources must be scholarly criticism or analysis, not summaries, reviews, or “analysis” from sites such as e-Notes, SparkNotes, Wikipedia*, 123HelpMe, or Gradesaver.com; instead, use the library resources, including the available electronic databases such as Academic Search Complete, Literary Sources through Artemis, Literature Resource Center, Bloom’s Literary Reference, Literature Criticism Online, Humanities Source, Project MUSE - Standard Collection, MagillOnLiterature Plus, and JSTOR Arts & Sciences I Current Collection  to locate appropriate sources. To access the databases from home, click on the individual database link. Then, when prompted, enter your username (N #) and password (PIN). Essays must contain quotations from or other references to your sources, and these references should be used to support your assertions about the text; you must include at least one short quotation, one long—block—quotation, and one paraphrase, and these sources must be properly documented (utilizing MLA format), and integrated into your writing smoothly and correctly. See also Research Paper checklist.

* On use of Wikipedia in college-level research, see Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales on PBS NewsHour, here: “I don't think at a university level it makes sense to cite any encyclopedia in an academic paper. That's just not what an encyclopedia's role is in the research process. Maybe if you're in junior high, you know? If some kid out there is twelve years old and they wrote something and they put in a footnote, we should be thrilled, right? That's his first start on the idea of crediting other people with ideas and things like that, but at the university level? No, it's a bit junior high to cite an encyclopedia.”

Please refer to the following as well:

   Formatting and Style Guide (Purdue Online Writing Lab)

   Incorporating Sources (class handout)

   Class Plagiarism Policy (on syllabus), as well as the Nassau Community College Policy on Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism (page 63 in the college catalog).

You might also find the following additional resources useful:

   Works Cited page (Instructions & Sample) (Microsoft Word document)

   Avoiding Plagiarism (Houghton-Mifflin web site)

   Practice Incorporating Sources into Your Work (Houghton-Mifflin web site)

   MLA format (Purdue university's Online Writing Lab)

 

Proposal/Topic Selection and Preliminary Thesis: Due Thursday, 26 September
Whether you are writing a traditional research paper or an alternative final project, you must establish a plan and a clear thesis before you can begin to put together a focused, well-organized, and purposeful product. Therefore, as your first step in the assignment, you must develop and submit a clear, well-written, one-page explanation of the topic you have chosen, your reason for the selection, your focus and opinion, and a clear, well-written, explicit, and assertive preliminary thesis. This proposal may also include a preliminary idea of the plan of the paper, its intention or research question. Note: Choose your topic carefully. You will not be allowed to change your topic once you have made your selection, although you may change your position on the particular issue and will, presumably, modify your thesis during the process of research and writing. *Note: Students must obtain prior approval for independent topics; speak to me before or after class or
email me to set up an appointment during my office hours.

Your proposal must take the following form:

Topic: the specific topic selected from the list provided or one you have developed in consultation with the instructor.
Rationale: why you have chosen to research and write about this particular topic.
Focus: a narrowed form of the subject, and the issue or debate involved.
Opinion: your subjective opinion on the debate or issue.
Thesis: your opinion, worded objectively.

For example:

Topic: W. B. Yeats’ The Death of Cuchulain
Rationale: We read about
Cuchulain in Prof. Anderson’s History of Ireland class last year, and she mentioned Yeats’ use of mythology, too, so I’m curious about it.
Focus: How does Yeats use Irish legends in
Cuchulain, and why? What is his intent?
Opinion: I think that Yeats wants to rekindle an interest in Irish tradition and mythology, which were being ignored in favor of English versions.
Preliminary Thesis: In The Death of
Cuchulain, Yeats rewrites Irish legend in order to emphasize the richness of his native tradition, as a reaction against English dominance in art, politics, and religion.

Topic Choices:

1)  Analysis of Another Culture’s Myths/Legends:
Research a body of cultural myths or folklore that we have not extensively covered, perhaps related to aspects of your personal heritage (for example, African myths, Celtic myths, Italian folklore, Caribbean legends, Latin American myths, Native American mythology, et cetera).  Then narrow and focus your topic more closely on an aspect of cultural myth that interests you.  You may consider focusing on how one culture treats one or more of the following, or on how two cultures contrast in their versions of them:

Cosmogony and Creation Myths

Flood Narratives

Trickster Tales

Hero Tales and the Heroic Quest

Ragnarök and Apocalypse

For example, you might research how the West African Anansi (trickster spider) stories were brought to the Caribbean.  Or you might want to compare African or Afro-Caribbean Anansi Spider stories with Native American Spider Woman stories or Native American Coyote stories.

2)  Case Study of Folklore, Kindermärchen, or Fairy Tales:
Based on the example of Cinderella: A Case Study, develop an analysis of a folktale, fairy tale, or motif that exists in multiple versions; for example,  Little Red Riding Hood, Beauty and the Beast (including Cupid and Psyche), The Mermaid Wife, Changelings and Fairy Abductions, and others. Consider the way in which the various versions of the story present a society and its cultural values and beliefs.  What purpose and/or effect do these values and beliefs have, and how do these represent or reflect the texts’ socio-cultural milieu?

3) Analysis of Adaptation(s):
Many myths, legends, or fairy tales, in addition to those discussed in class, have been adapted into modern short stories, novels, plays, even films or graphic novels. Others have been adapted in a manner more free than that employed for those listed above. These adaptations are generally less “faithful” to the text, essentially involving a radical transformation or expansion or a complete revision of the original, often including a shift in setting, both time and place. (Consider Amy Heckerling’s
Clueless and its radical, Suzanne Ferriss might say reactionary  revision of Jane Austen’s Emma as an example of this kind of treatment.)  Choose one such text and analyze at least two different modern revisions or adaptations. How does the modern revision alter or adapt the ancient text, and to what end? That is, not only how are the texts different, but why? How does each version adapt, revise, or alter the story? What is changed or left out, and why? How do all of these individual changes contribute to a different interpretation of the text; that is, what is the significant difference between the versions? And, finally, how does the socio-cultural milieu of each film inform these differences? Some suggested works (see me if you have others in mind):

 [Anonymous.] Ballads, such as the 13th-century Swedish “Töres döttrar i Wänge,:
Adapted by screenwriter Ulla Isaksson
as Ingmar Bergman’s Jungfrukällan, a.k.a. The Virgin Spring, 1960
Adapted by Wes Craven as
Last House on the Left, 1972 (Seriously! See here, for example. See also, Dennis Iliadis’s remake of The Last House on the Left, 2009).

 Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, or, The Voyage of the Argo :
Graves, Robert. The Golden Fleece (1944 UK version; aka Hercules, My Shipmate, 1945 US version)
Riordan, Rick. The Sea of Monsters. (2006)
Treece, Henry. Jason (1961)
Several film versions, including the classic
Jason and the Argonauts, aka Jason and the Golden Fleece with effects by Ray Harryhausen, the not-so-classic made-for-television 2000 remake., and (I kid you not) a 1968 Soviet musical version.

 Beowulf :
Crichton, Michael.
Eaters of the Dead,  filmed as The 13th Warrior
Gardner, John.
Grendel, filmed as the animated Australian Grendel, Grendel, Grendel
Headley, Maria Dahvana.
The Mere Wife.
Hinds, Gareth, adapt. and illus. Beowulf [graphic novel]. Cambridge, MA: Candelwick P, 2007.
Several other film versions, including the 2007 version and the vaguely futuristic science fiction version

*   Homer, The Iliad and related tales:
Shanower, Eric. Age of Bronze, Vol. 1: A Thousand Ships. Orange, CA: Image Comics, 2001. (originally published as Age of Bronze issues 1-9).
---.
Age of Bronze, Vol. 2: Sacrifice. Orange, CA: Image Comics, 2005. (originally published as Age of Bronze issues 10-19).
---.
Age of Bronze, Vol. 3: Betrayal. Orange, CA: Image Comics, 2007. (originally published as Age of Bronze issues 20-24).
Morrow, James. “Arms and the Woman.” Bible Stories for Adults. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1996. 215-243.
Twenty-eight movies about the Trojan War

*   Homer, The Odyssey and related tales:
Atwood, Margaret. The Penelopiad: The Myth of Penelope and Odysseus
Joyce, James. Ulysses.
Georges Méliès 1905
L'île de Calypso: Ulysse et le géant Polyphème
O Brother, Where Art Thou?

*   Ovid, Metamorphoses and Classical Mythology
Philips, Marie. Gods Behaving Badly. Boston: Little Brown, 2007.
Terry, Philip, ed. Ovid Metamorphosed. London: Vintage, 2001.
Numerous film adaptations of individual myths and legends, ranging from Walt Disney’s The Goddess of Spring and the classic  Black Orpheus to Clash of the Titans

*   Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur and Arthurian Legends
Too many literary and cinematic adaptions to mention, including
about 100 film versions, including George Romero’s classic (camp) 1981 Knightriders.

*   Folklore, Kinder- and Huasmärchen, and Fairy Tales:
Adaptations to numerus to mention, including “Little Red Riding Hood” adapted as
Red Riding Hood (2011) or Angela Carter’s “The Company of Wolves“ in The Bloody Chamber, adapted as a radio play and then filmed as The Company of Wolves.

4)  Mythopoeia and Explication (Create your own mythology):
Jut as
The Silmarillion provides an entire mythological/historical background for J.R.R. Tolkien’s tales of Middle Earth, develop a myth or series of myths that could be appropriate to a specific culture of your imagining, and analyze/explain its importance and significance in terms of cultural identity, transmission of norms and standards, and so on. That is, contrast your mythology and its use with that of an extant body of myth or legends, such as those of the Norse, Egyptian, or Blackfoot.) Your created mythology could include any or all of the following:

Cosmogony and Creation Myths

Flood Narratives

Trickster Tales

Hero Tales and the Heroic Quest

Ragnarök and Apocalypse

5)  A topic of your own.
If you wish to write on a topic other than those listed above, or to develop an alternative project (An illustrated book of Sumerian myths for children? An animated version, with commentary, of creation as depicted in the
Rig Veda?), you must obtain approval at least one full week in advance of the Proposal/Topic Selection due date. You must discuss with me your proposed project, its scope, and your plans; please speak to me before or after class or email me to set up an appointment during my office hours. 

Please feel free to communicate any concerns or questions to me; I will be available to meet with any student who needs assistance or additional instruction.

 

Annotated Preliminary Bibliography: Due Thursday, 31 October
You must submit an  annotated preliminary bibliography with a minimum of five to seven sources, correctly cited according to
MLA style. This may include up to three primary sources and a minimum of three to five secondary sources; secondary sources must be scholarly criticism or analysis, not summaries, reviews, or “analysis” from sites such as e-Notes, SparkNotes, Wikipedia*, 123HelpMe, or Gradesaver.com; instead, use the library resources, including the available electronic databases such as Academic Search Complete, InfoTrac General OneFile, Lexis-Nexis Academic, Opposing Viewpoints in Context, Points of View Reference Center, and CQ Researcher, to locate appropriate sources. To access the databases from home, click on the individual database link. Then, when prompted, enter your username (N #) and password (PIN). You may also utilize MRQE.com, The Movie Review Query Engine, but be sure to select only professional, reliable reviews: New York Times? Probably okay. JoBlo's Movie Emporium? Not so much.

In addition to a correct citation for each source, you must include a description or summary of the source, at least one paragraph long, and an explanation of how you foresee incorporating it into your essay. For additional information on Annotated Bibliographies, see the Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL)’s Annotated Bibliographies, as well as “Sample Annotated Bibliography“ and Ebel, Kimberly, “Class and Gender in Cinderella: Annotated Bibliography.”

You might also find the following additional resources useful:

   MLA Documentation of Films: Works Cited and In-Text Citations

   Works Cited page (Instructions & Sample) (Microsoft Word document)

   MLA format (Purdue university's Online Writing Lab)

 

Preliminary Draft: Due Tuesday, 3 December
A finished, typed draft of the completed research essay must be submitted for review, evaluation, and comments. This should be a complete draft of your research essay, using a minimum of three to five secondary sources, five to seven pages, and including both a
cover page and Works Cited page. This draft is worth 5% of your final grade; failure to bring the required essay will result in a zero for the assignment.

Note: You do not need to submit the folder containing copies of your sources at this time.

 

Presentations: Tuesday and Thursday, 17 & 19 December
Students will present to the class a summary and explanation of their final project or research essay. Each presentation must be five to ten minutes long, and, ideally, open-ended, leading into class discussions with questions, major themes, or topics for further thought. Handouts, visual aids, or multi-media presentations are not required, but certainly allowed. You must be present on the day you have signed up for to give your presentation.

 

Research Paper: Due Tuesday, 17 December

The final research essay must be submitted, in its folder with all supporting materials: photocopies or printouts of all sources, Topic Selection and Preliminary Thesis, Annotated Preliminary Bibliography, Preliminary Draft, outline–if you have completed one–and any other related materials. Be sure to print out or photocopy all secondary sources, and highlight all relevant passages, whether quoted, paraphrased, or summarized. Failure to submit a complete folder according to these instructions will be grounds for failure on the assignment. In addition, plagiarism, either in whole or in part, will result in automatic failure (a grade of zero) for the assignment. You must also submit a copy via TurnItIn.com.

Failure to submit the complete folder on the due date will result in a zero for the assignment.

 

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Links

Grammar, Writing, and Research Papers:

Prentice Hall’s iPractice

Study Guides and Strategies

Hodges’ Harbrace Handbook

College Writing Skills with Readings

Patterns for a Purpose

How to Write a Research Paper

Online English Grammar

More on Writing a Research Paper

A Guide to Grammar & Writing

MLA format

Another Guide to Grammar and Style

Getting an A on an English Paper

Plagiarism.org

TurnItIn.com

The Grammar Curmudgeon

Society for the Preservation of English Language and Literature

re: Writing for Literature

Additional Textbook Options:

Used Textbooks:

Bigwords.com
Bookbyte.com
Buyusedtextbooks.com
Campusbooks.com
CollegeSwapShop.com
Ebay.com
Half.com
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E-Books:

Bkstore.com (B&N)
CampusBooks.com
Coursesmart.com
eCampus.com
efollett.com
Cengagebrain.com
Pearsonhighered.com/student
Wiley.com

Textbook Rental:

Bookrenter.com
Campusbookrentals.com
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Collegebookrenter.com
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Textbookrentals.com

Comparison Shopping:

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Bookscouter.com NEW CampusBooks4Less.com
Collegebooksnow.com
DirectTextBook.com
Half.com
textbook.pricecomparison.com
The Cheap Textbook.com

Links to sites for textbook purchase or rental are provided for students seeking textbook options; no guarantees or recommendations concerning these services are intended, either express or implied.

Research Essay Links

Research should begin with the available electronic databases such as Academic Search Complete, InfoTrac General OneFile, Lexis-Nexis Academic, Opposing Viewpoints in Context, Points of View Reference Center, and CQ Researcher.

Especially useful should be Literary Sources through Artemis, Literature Resource Center, Bloom’s Literary Reference, Literature Criticism Online, Humanities Source, Project MUSE - Standard Collection, MagillOnLiterature Plus, and JSTOR Arts & Sciences I Current Collection.

To access the databases from home, click on the individual database link. Then, when prompted, enter your username (N #) and password (PIN).

Notify me of any broken or outdated links at bmurphy@Brian-T-Murphy.com.

Additional links may be provided.

 

 

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Last Revised: Wednesday, 18 September 2019
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