ENG 209: Modern Irish Literature, Spring 2018
Section GA:  Monday G Building, Room 359; Wednesday South Hall 101
                   11:00 am–12:15 pm

James Joyce, Dubliners
Brian Friel, Dancing at LughnasaJ.M. Synge, The Playboy of the Western World...WIlliam Trevor, The Oxford Book of Irish Short Stoires

Brian T. Murphy

Bradley Hall, Y-16
516-572-7718

e-mail: brian.murphy@ncc.edu

Schedule and Office Hours
 

 

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

 

Description

Objectives

Texts

Policies 

Assignments

 Grading 

Schedule

Links

Important Announcements and Updates: Click HERE
 

Print-friendly syllabus (Microsoft Word) here.

Other printable documents:
Model for Evaluation of Student Writing
 
Works Cited page (Instructions & Sample)
Cover Page for Research Essays (Sample)
Standard MLA Format for Essays
Revision and Editing Checklist
Incorporating Sources
Paragraph Outline
Essay Outline

 

For the Great Gaels of Ireland
Are the men that God made mad,
For all their wars are merry
And all their songs are sad.

  —from G. K. Chesterton,
The Ballad of the White Horse

 

DESCRIPTION:
According to the official catalog description for ENG 209, “This course examines outstanding works by major writers such as Yeats, Joyce, Shaw, O’Casey, O’Connor, Behan, and Beckett and their cultural background in relation to the Irish literary tradition. Writing is an integral component of the course.” This class will emphasize critical reading and analysis of selected fiction, poetry, drama, and/or essays. Irish authors and stylistic developments in Irish literature from the Modern period to the present day will be considered.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or ENG 109.
It is assumed that students have successfully completed the prerequisite for this course, ENG 102
or ENG 109 (or the equivalent).  Therefore, students are expected to have the necessary background and experience in analyzing, discussing, and responding to written works, as well as the ability to conduct independent research and to write correctly documented research essays using MLA format.

Students are cautioned that this course requires extensive reading, writing, and discussions; students not prepared to read  and to write on a regular basis and to take an active part in class discussions should not consider taking this course.

 

OBJECTIVES:

 

Course Goals

Learning Outcomes

Writing Literacy: to produce precise, clear,   grammatically-correct, well-developed, and well-organized writing appropriate   to academic, social, and occupational fields

Produce coherent texts within common college level forms

Revise and improve such texts

Critical Thinking: to develop critical thinking skills

Identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments
  as they occur in their own and others’ work

Develop well-reasoned arguments

Informational Literacy: to develop skills to locate, evaluate,   and incorporate relevant source materials into the construction and   expression of an informed point of view

Access and utilize basic computer and   internet functions, demonstrating appropriate and effective utilization of   programs and functions

Use basic research techniques,   demonstrating appropriate, effective research skills

Locate, evaluate, organize, and   synthesize information from a variety of sources, demonstrating the ability   to implement an effective search strategy to obtain reliable information

Apply ethical and legal standards for use   of source information, demonstrating the application of accepted ethical and   legal restrictions on the use of published works

Cultural Literacy: to develop exposure to literary texts   that reflect the diversity of the human experience in a variety of historical   and cultural frameworks

Demonstrate understanding of the various   influences that shape perspectives, values, and identities

Demonstrate understanding of social   divisions such as gender, ability, ethnicity, and racial formations in a   pluralistic nation and world

Recognize the roles and responsibilities   of citizens in a diverse world

Aesthetic Literacy: to understand the role of literary art   as a craft that allows for the expression, enhancement, and questioning of the human experience

Identify creative techniques/craft   elements that shape aesthetic responses/meanings and be able to communicate   that information by using appropriate vocabulary

Interpret creative work through a variety of lenses such as knowledge of the creator’s work, the tradition the creator   is working within, the culture and history the work is embedded in, and the creator’s aims and intentions

 

Students will:

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Discuss the works of major modern Irish writers in the contexts of literary, social, and intellectual movements;

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Trace the development of themes and genres within their historical contexts;

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Analyze literary works for their aesthetic features and thematic patterns;

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Identify styles, themes, and works of major writers;

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Examine a variety of critical approaches to literature.

 

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TEXTS:
Required: All required texts are available at the college bookstore. Anticipated bookstore prices are listed for each.

Friel, Brian. Dancing at Lughnasa: A Play. London and Boston: Faber and Faber, 1998. ISBN 9780571144792.
Print, new: $12.35
Print, used: $9.75
Print, new rental: $10.20
Print, used rental: $2.45
eBook, buy: $14.55

(Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com***).

Joyce, James. Dubliners. New York: Signet, 2007. ISBN 9780451530417.
Print, new: $5.95
Print, used: $4.70
Print, new rental: $4.05
Print, used rental: $2.80
(Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com***).

Synge, J. M. The Playboy of the Western World and Riders to the Sea. New York: Dover, 1993. ISBN 9780486275628.
Print, new: $2.85
Print, used: $2.25
Print, new rental: $1.95
Print, used rental: $1.35
eBook, buy: $2.50
(Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com***).

Trevor, William, ed. The Oxford Book of Irish Short Stories. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010. ISBN 9780199583140.
Print, new: $18.95
Print, used: $14.95
Print, new rental: $16.75
Print, used rental: $7.95
(Available used starting at $1.11 at Amazon.com***).

 

Supplemental handouts, to be distributed in class.

A good college-level (paperback) dictionary (Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com***).

Recommended:

Hacker, Diana. Rules for Writers, 7 ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2012. ISBN 9780312647360.
(Available used starting at $35.00 at Amazon.com***), or another current college-level handbook.

(See also Additional Textbook Options, below)

Recommended additional texts:**

Irish literature, history, culture, religion, selected texts, and so on:

Bartlett, Thomas. The Fall and Rise of the Irish Nation: The Catholic Question, 1690-1830. Savage, MD: Barnes and Noble, 1992.

---. Ireland: A History. Cambridge: Camridge UP, 2011.

Birmingham, Kevin. The Most Dangerous Book: The Battle for James Joyce’s Ulysses. New York: Penguin, 2014.

Bonaccorso, Richard. Sean O’Faolain’s Irish Vision. Albany, NY: SUNY P, 1987.

Brown, Terence. Ireland: A Social and Cultural History, 1922-2001. Ithaca, NY: Cornell U.P., 1985.

Cahill, Thomas. How the Irish Saved Civilization: The Untold Story of Ireland’s Heroic Role from the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe. New York: Nan Talese/Doubleday, 1995.

The Context and Development of Irish Literature: History, Poetry, Landscape. Irish Literary Studies, Washington and Lee University. Lexington, VA

Edwards, Ruth Dudley. An Atlas of Irish History, 2 ed. New York: Methuen, 1937.

Encyclopaedia of Ireland. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1968.

Eyler, Audrey S. and Robert F. Garatt, ed. The Uses of the Past: Essays on Irish Culture. Newark: U. Delaware P.1988.

Doyle, Roddy. The Commitments. New York: Vintage, 1989.

---.  Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha. New York: Penguin, 1995.

Fanning, Charles. The Irish Voice In America 250 Years of Irish-American Fiction, 2nd ed. Lexington, KY: U P of Kentucky, 2000.

Foster, R. F. Modern Ireland: 1600-1972. New York: Penguin, 1990.

Garrett, Peter K., ed. Twentieth Century Interpretations of Dubliners : A Collection of Critical Essays. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1968.

Gorman, Herbert. James Joyce. New York: [?], 1940.

Harmon, Maurice. Fenians and Fenianism; Centenary Essays. Seattle: U. Washington P.,1970.

Holdeman, David. The Cambridge Introduction to W.B. Yeats (Cambridge Introductions to Literature). Cambridge, England: Cambridge U.P., 2006.

Inglis, Tom. Moral Monopoly: The Catholic Church in Modern Irish Society. New York: St. Martin’s, 1984.

Irish Authors in the Irish Landscape. Irish Literary Studies, Washington and Lee University. Lexington, VA

Jackson, Alvin. Ireland 1798-1998: War, Peace and Beyond, 2 ed.. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.

Kinsella, Thomas, ed. The New Oxford Book of Irish Verse. Oxford, England: Oxford UP, 2001.

Lyons, F. S. L. Culture and Anarchy in Ireland, 1890-1939. New York: Oxford UP, 1982.

McCourt, Frank.Angela’s Ashes: A Memoir. New York: Scribner, 1996.

---. ’Tis: A Memoir. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Moody, T. W. A New History of Ireland. Oxford, England: Clarendon, 1976.

Murphy, Maureen O’Rourke and James MacKillop. An Irish Literature Reader: Poetry, Prose, Drama. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse U.P., 2006.

Nolan, Elmer. James Joyce and Nationalism. London: Routledge, 2014.

O’Casey, Sean. Three Dublin Plays: The Shadow of a Gunman, Juno and the Paycock, & The Plough and the Stars. London: Faber & Faber, 1998.

Stevens, Patricia Bunning. God Save Ireland! the Irish Conflict in the Twentieth Century.. New York: Macmillan, 1974.

Tóibín, Colm. Brooklyn: A Novel. New York: Scribner, 2009.

Unterecker, John. A Reader’s Guide to William Butler Yeats. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse U. P., 1959.

Uris, Leon and Jill Uris. Ireland: A Terrible Beauty; The Story of Ireland Today. New York: Doubleday, 1975.

Yeats, William Butler. The Autobiography of William Butler Yeats; Consisting of Reveries over Childhood and Youth, The Trembling of the Veil, and Dramatis Personae. New York: MacMillan, 1965.

General literature, writing, and related topics:

Bloom, Harold. How to Read and Why. New York: Scribner, 2000. (Available starting at $1.00 at Amazon.com***)

Casagrande, June. Grammar Snobs are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite. New York: Penguin, 2006. (Available starting at $3.94 at Amazon.com***)

---. Mortal Syntax: 101 Language Choices That Will Get You Clobbered by the Grammar SnobsEven If You’re Right. New York: Penguin, 2008 (Available used starting at $6.61 at Amazon.com***).

Crystal, David. Words, Words, Words. New York: Oxford U P, 2006 (Available used starting at $9.28 at Amazon.com***).

Denby, David. Great Books: My Adventures with Homer, Rousseau, Woolf, and Other Indestructible Writers of the Western World. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996. (Available starting at $0.29 at Amazon.com***).

Dirda, Michael. Classics for Pleasure. Orlando, FL: Harcourt, 2007. (Available starting at $1.49 at Amazon.com***)

Foster, Thomas C. How to Read Literature Like a Professor. [New York: Harper, 2008 ?].†

---. How to Read Novels Like a Professor. New York: Harper, 2008.

Kozol, Jonathan. Letters to a Young Teacher. New York: Crown, 2007 (Available starting at $12.15 at Amazon.com***).

--- The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America. New York: Crown, 2005 (Available starting at $10.17 at Amazon.com***).

Lederer, Richard. Anguished English: An Anthology of Accidental Assaults Upon Our Language. Charleston, SC: Wyrick & Company, 1987 (Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com***).

---. More Anguished English: An Expose of Embarrassing Excruciating, and Egregious Errors in English. New York: Dell, 1994 (Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com***).

Truss, Lynne. Eats, Shoots & Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation. New York: Gotham Books, 2004 (Available used starting at $2.70 at Amazon.com***).

 

*Note: Many of the individual stories, poems and plays to be read and discussed are available online; these are indicated on the schedule (below) as hyperlinks. However, students are still strongly cautioned that they must purchase the textbook for class use, as well as for the supplemental materials included. Additional poems and/or short stories to be assigned  are not included in the books ordered for the class, but may be accessed through the links provided or will be distributed as handouts in class.

** Recommended additional texts are not required purchases, and have not been ordered for the course; however, they provide—depending on the course— alternative readings, historical and cultural backgrounds, criticism, personal literary responses, or entertaining (irreverent, possibly sacrilegious) revisions. Students who find themselves becoming deeply interested in one or more of the required readings may find these interesting and/or useful. When indicated with a dagger (†), texts are only provisionally recommended, as I have not read these works yet, although they have received excellent reviews or recommendations.

*** Prices listed at Amazon.com do not include shipping, and are accurate as of original posting date only; no guarantees of prices or availability are express or implied§.

 

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CLASS POLICIES:

Attendance:
As per the Nassau Community College attendance policy“Students are expected to attend all classes. Absences due to illness or for other serious reasons may be excused at the discretion of the instructor. Students are advised that absences in excess of 10% of the total class meetings may result being dropped from the course.”  Students must not only attend every class and lab meeting, but also arrive on time, be prepared, and take an active part in class (see Participation, below); students may be required to sign in each class session to verify their attendance. Excessive absences or latenesses will adversely affect your grade: Students may miss no more than three classes or lab meetings; further absences will result in a reduction of the final grade by one full letter grade for each additional absence. Students unable to attend class should contact the instructor regarding their absence; in addition, students are responsible for submitting all work on time regardless of absences. In addition, once students get to class, they are expected to stay in the classroom until the class is over. Leaving class early or getting up in the middle of class is considered disruptive behavior and should happen only in extreme emergencies.

Classroom Behavior:
Students are expected to be present, prepared, attentive, and active participants in the learning process. As such, any distracting or inappropriate behavior or unauthorized use of electronic devices* is strictly prohibited. Students who wish to use a laptop for note-taking may be allowed to do so at the instructors discretion, but will be required to sit in the front row and to submit a copy of their notes to the professor at the end of each class; failure to do so will result in being recorded as absent. Eating, sleeping, texting, or other inappropriate behavior may result in your being asked to leave the class and will adversely affect your final grade. According to the “Student Code of Conduct,” “The College is committed to providing an atmosphere in which students have freedom to learn and engage in the search for truth, knowledge, and reason in accordance with the standards set forth by the academic community. Conduct that adversely affects a student’s responsible membership in the academic community shall result in appropriate disciplinary action.” Appropriate disciplinary action may include but is not limited to probation, suspension, and expulsion from the college. See the Nassau Community College Classroom Management Policy and Student Code of Conduct in the college catalog.

*On cell phone use in class, see Andrew Lepp, Jacob E. Barkley, and Aryn C. Karpinski. The Relationship between Cell Phone Use and Academic Performance in a Sample of U.S. College Students.” SAGE Open 19 Feb. 2015.

Plagiarism and Cheating:
Plagiarism includes copying or paraphrasing another’s words, ideas, or facts without crediting the source; submitting a paper written by someone else, either in whole or in part, as one’s own work; or submitting work previously submitted for another course or instructor. Plagiarism, cheating, or other forms of academic dishonesty on any assignment will result in failure (a grade of zero) for that assignment and may result in further disciplinary action, including but not limited to failure for the course and expulsion from the college. See the Nassau Community College policy on Academic Dishonesty & Plagiarism.

Homework/Essay Submission:
 

For each of the assigned essays and projects, a topic or list of topic choices will be provided. Your work must be on one of the assigned topics for that assignment or developed in consultation with the instructor* or it will receive a grade of “F”.

*Note: You must obtain prior approval to write on topics other than those listed below; speak to me before or after class to set up an appointment during my office hours. Approval must be obtained at least one full week in advance of the due date. See details below.

All writing assignments must be received by the instructor on or before the due date, by the beginning of the class period, as indicated on the schedule, below. Students may also be required to submit an electronic copy of their work via TurnItIn.com; details to be announced. Essays submitted by email will not be accepted, and late work if accepted will be penalized 10% for each day it is late; see below. All at-home work must be typed (in 12-point Times New Roman), double-spaced, with one-inch margins, and stapled when submitted. In-class work must be neatly printed in blue or black ink on loose-leaf composition paper or in bluebooks provided by the instructor and double-spaced§. All essays must also include a proper heading (see Purdue Online Writing Lab’s Formatting and Style Guide), including Word Count; have an appropriate, original title; contain a clear, explicit, assertive, objectively worded thesis statement (thesis statements must be underlined); and (unless otherwise indicated) avoid use of I or you throughout. Finally, all work should be grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, spelling, and documentation, and will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing. Please refer to the Paragraph Outline or Essay Outline and Revising and Editing Checklist for additional assistance.

Also, one would think that this would not even need to be stated, but read the work or works about which you are writing, and read them carefully! Do not rely upon your general impressions based on what you think was said in class, or on what you read online. There is no reason for your essays to contain factual errors.

Please feel free to communicate any concerns or questions to me before the essays are due; I will be available to meet with any student who needs assistance or additional instruction. Please speak to me before or after class or email me to set up an appointment during my office hours.

§ On format, handwriting, and neatness, see Chase, Clinton I. “Essay Test Scoring: Interaction of Relevant Variables.” Journal of Educational Measurement 23.1 (1986): 33-41 and
   Marshall, Jon C. and Jerry M. Powers. “Writing Neatness, Composition Errors, and Essay Grades.” Journal of Educational Measurement 6.2 (1988): 306-324.

Revisions:
All failing essays may be revised and resubmitted by the due dates announced when the graded essays are returned. Essays receiving a passing grade may also be revised and resubmitted, but only after the student has met with the instructor during office hours (by appointment only) to discuss revisions. Revisions must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay (revisions should be based upon the Revising and Editing Checklist and relevant information from class and the textbooks), and must be submitted with the original graded essay and/or draft(s) attached as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, in the following  pattern:

  • Paragraph 1: Changes in content. What was added, deleted, or modified.

  • Paragraph 2: Changes in organization. What sentences, ideas, or paragraphs were moved, how things were rearranged, and why.

  • Paragraph 3: Cosmetic level changes. What specific editing for grammar was performed, or what corrections made in punctuation, mechanics, and diction.

Evidence of substantial revision may result in a better grade for the assignment. If you did not submit a completed essay on time, or if you submit a plagiarized essay, you will receive a grade of zero and may not submit a “revision.”

Make-up Exams/Late Work:
All assignment deadlines and scheduled exam dates are provided at the beginning of the semester; therefore, no make-up opportunities will be offered or late work accepted, except under extraordinary circumstances with appropriate documentation, and late work will be penalized 10% for each day or portion thereof it is submitted after the due date. Note: As all work is due at the beginning of the class period, this includes work submitted on the due date after class has begun.

Excuses such as “crashed computers,” “lost flash drives,” or “empty printer ink cartridges” will not be accepted. All essays or work should be saved both on your computer’s hard drive and again on removable storage device as well as uploaded to cloud storage (OneDrive, et cetera). Students should also keep backup copies of all work submitted.

*See also,  Mike Adams, “The Dead Grandmother/Exam Syndrome.”

Disabilities and Accommodations:
If you have a physical, psychological, medical, or learning disability that may adversely impact your ability to carry out the assigned coursework, contact the staff at the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD) in Building U: 572-7241, TTY 572-7617. CSD will review your concerns and determine with you what accommodations are necessary and appropriate. All information and documentation are confidential.

 

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ASSIGNMENTS:
Attendance and Participation (10%):
As this class will combine both lecture and discussion, students are expected both to attend every session and to take an active part in class—joining in discussions and raising questions. Discussion is one of the best ways to clarify your understandings and to test your conclusions; therefore, it is imperative that all students participate regularly in order that we may together discover what each selection “means” to us. Open discussion always involves personal exposure, and thus the taking of risks: your ideas may not be the same as your fellow students’ or even the instructor’s. Yet as long as your points are honest and supportable, they will be respected by all of us in the classroom. Questions, discussion, disagreement, and laughter are all encouraged in this class (However, ridicule or scoffing is never tolerated).

Quizzes (10%):
With the exception of the first day, class may begin with a short (five- to ten-minute) quiz or writing assignment on the reading(s) for the day, at the instructor’s discretion. Quizzes missed due to tardiness may not be made up. At the end of the semester, the lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Total number of quizzes during the semester will determine the point value of each; that is, if 11 quizzes are given (lowest quiz grade will be dropped), each quiz is worth up to one full point.

Essays (2 @ 20%):
Students will complete two essays during the semester; topics should be selected from the list of suggestions provided (see Essay Topics, below) or developed in consultation with the instructor. Each should be at least five to seven pages (1250 words minimum), with a cover page and Works Cited page (cover page and Works Cited do not count toward the five- to seven-page requirement), and stapled when submitted.  The paper must be argumentative (persuasive), with a clear, explicit, and assertive thesis statement (underlined), and must use a minimum of five to seven sources, including at least one to three primary sources (the text or texts discussed) and three to five secondary sources. Essays should be grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, spelling, and documentation, and will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing. Please refer to the Essay Outline and Revising and Editing Checklist for additional assistance, as well as Writing About Literature, Writing a Literature Paper, and Getting an A on an English Paper.

Exams (2 @ 20%):
Students will complete two exams: an in-class midterm and a final during the designated final exam period. These exams will each evaluate students’ recognition and comprehension of material studied during the previous weeks, covering specific texts, literary themes, and cultural and historical backgrounds. The exams may combine objective questions and short essay answers, and students may be entitled to use notes or textbooks for the essay portion of the exams.

Poetic Recitation (2-4 points Extra Credit):
Memorization serves the student’s skills of reading lines carefully and making judgments about how particular passages can be interpreted. Therefore, there will be opportunities for recitation twice during the semester, at midterm and during finals week. Students may select and memorize one of the selections listed below to recite in front of the class for extra credit on each occasion; each recitation is worth up to 2 points. Students must sign up for these dates at least one week in advance, as sufficient time must be allocated for completion of the exam; in addition, no more than two students may elect to recite each poem.

Selections for Recitation 1 (Midterm):
ball.gif (137 bytes) Macneice, Louis. “House On A Cliff (12 lines)
 
---. “Soap Suds” (16 lines)
ball.gif (137 bytes) Murphy, Richard. “Green Martyrs” (18 lines)
 
 ---.Orange March” (16 lines)
 
 ---.Rapparees”(21 lines)
ball.gif (137 bytes) Yeats, William Butler. “The Lake Isle of Innisfree (12 lines)
 
 ---.The Second Coming” (22 lines)
 
 ---.  When You Are Old (12 lines)
 
 ---.The Wild Swans at Coole” (18 lines)

Selections for Recitation 2 (Final Exam week):
Students may select from any of the above, or one of the following poems.
(
Note: Specific poems/selections from poems to be determined)

ball.gif (137 bytes) Kinsella, Thomas.
 ---. “At the Ocean’s Edge
ll. 1-12
 ---. “The Force of Eloquence” (14 lines)
 ---. “Mirror in February ll. 1-14
 ---. “Night Songs 1: ll. 1-12
 ---. “Night Songs 2: ll. 1-14

ball.gif (137 bytes) Heaney, Seamus.
 ---. “Anything Can Happen
(16 lines)
 ---. “Blackberry-Picking” ll. 11-24
 ---. Digging” ll. 15-31
 ---. Mid-Term Break” (22 lines)
 ---.
Strange Fruit” (14 lines)
 

 

Extra Credit (various opportunities, at 1–2 points each):
In addition to Poetic Recitation, above, students may be notified of opportunities for extra credit during the semester, including attendance at various workshops or cultural events related to the class (Recommended Field Trips). If students attend one or more of these events, and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), they can receive additional points: a single event and written response is usually worth 2 points extra credit; attendance at additional events will earn one additional point each.

Note: As a general rule, extra credit only helps if you have already completed all of the assigned work, and will not make up for missing an essay (or two, or three). Extra credit opportunities will be announced in class, and they will also be posted here as well as on the class Announcements page, so do not ask at the end of the semester for extra credit to bring your average up. Students asking for extra points or changes to their grade may have their grade reduced, instead.

Extra credit opportunities to date:

Origin’s First Irish Theater Festival
January 9–29 | Tickets $25 – $130 | 15 Venues

Since its founding in 2007, Origin’s 1st Irish is the world’s only theatre festival dedicated to showcasing the work of contemporary Irish playwrights with a mix of new and acclaimed productions from both sides of the Atlantic.

The Festival takes place in a number of distinguished venues throughout the city, including Irish Rep, New York City Center, Irish Arts Center, American Irish Historical Society, and Symphony Space. This year the Festival welcomes and organizes productions and special projects from Belfast, Dublin, Boston, The Bronx, and Manhattan.

Join us in celebrating 10 years and experience one or all of our seven productions and nine special events over this three-week run.

Multiple events, including:

The Irish Repertory Theatre presents
The Tara Finney Productions 20th Anniversary Production
Disco Pigs by Enda Walsh
directed by John Haidar
starring Evanna Lynch & Colin Campbell

Born at the same time on the same day in the same hospital, Pig and Runt have been inseparable ever since. They speak in their own language, play by their own rules, and create a world for themselves in which boundaries blur between truth and illusion. Until, on their seventeenth birthday, they discover something more. As night falls, and the disco and drink take hold, they spiral violently out of control.

Enda Walsh’s breathtaking breakthrough play, Disco Pigs, “didn’t so much debut at the 1997 Edinburgh Fringe, as erupt there.” (The Guardian).

Marking the 20th anniversary of its explosive British debut, Disco Pigs comes to the Irish Repertory Theatre starring Evanna Lynch (Harry Potter, My Name is Emily) and Colin Campbell (Dublin by Lamplight, Through A Glass Darkly).

January 5–February 18, 2018
Wednesday: 3 & 8 pm; Thursday: 7 pm; Friday: 8 pm
Saturday: 3 & 8 pm; Sunday: 3 pm

Tickets: $24-70

The Irish Repertory Theatre
132 West 22nd Street
New York, NY 10011

Dyin’ for It
Presented by Maria Deasy and Derek Murphy
Directed by John Keating

Devilishly funny Dublin playwright Derek Murphy takes us inside the home of the Kelly women as they prepare to grieve the imminent death of their patriarch, and they would grieve if only he’d get on with it. A murdered cabbage, a missing eye, and a haunted toilet, the Kelly’s are falling apart while trying hard not to come together.

Wednesday, January 17–Sunday, January 28th, 2018

The Cell
338 West 23rd Street (btw 8th & 9th Aves)
New York, NY 10011

Vital Voices
Origin’s First Irish Theater Festival is partnering with The Lyric Theatre in creating a cultural bridge between New York and Belfast.
Come celebrate an evening dedicated to two vital voices from the world of theater. Plays include Away With The Fairies by Seamus Collins and All Mod Cons by Erica Murray
Directed by Kim Kerfoot

Wednesday, January 17th, 2018
7:00 pm
FREE EVENT
Limited seating RSVP advised
Reservations: 866 811 4111

The American Irish Historical Society
991 5th Avenue (between 80/81 Streets)
New York, NY 10028

The Film Forum  Presents: Peter Lennon’s
The Rocky Road to Dublin (1968)

Irish-born Lennon returns home from Paris, with New Wave icon Raoul Coutard in tow, to capture the plight of a nation that “survived 700 years of English occupation, and then nearly sank under the weight of its own heroes and clergy.” Trinity students debate censorship, schoolboys recite their catechism, Father Cleary, Ireland’s “singing priest” (later discovered to have had a lifelong affair with his housekeeper) cracks jokes with gravediggers, while a housewife questions her confessor’s prohibition on coitus interruptus. A mix of verité, Lennon’s commentary, and interviews with poets, priests, journalists, and John Huston, all to the music of The Dubliners. While not banned (no sex), it was effectively buried in its home country– its single lunchtime screening at the Cork festival scheduled at the same time as a free Guinness and oyster lunch 20 miles away–but found more success among French critics and the students of the May youth revolt (it was the final film screened at the ’68 Cannes festival before Godard and co. stormed the stage to shut it down). 

“An energetic, punchy, daring film, not least in its challenge to the cronyist political establishment which infuriated the younger generation in Ireland – then as now.”– Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian. Digital. Approx. 69 min.

Sunday, January 21 at 7:30 pm
Monday, January 22 at 3:50
pm

The Film Forum
209 West Houston St. west of 6th Ave.
New York, NY 10014

Glucksman Ireland House
 New York University
1 Washington Mews,
New York, NY 10003

Multiple events, including:

13th Annual Barra Ó Donnabhain Lecture: Ambassador Daniel Mulhal
“Douglas Hyde’s Revival”
Douglas Hyde’s ‘The necessity for de-anglicising the Irish nation’ is one of the key documents of the Irish revival that helped pave the way for Irish independence. Hyde was instrumental in establishing the Gaelic League in 1893. The League became a magnet for a younger generation of Irish nationalists, many of whom took part in the events of 1916–22. Ambassador Mulhall’s lecture will explore Douglas Hyde’s ideas and will look at how they contributed to the broader cultural and political revival that helped transform Ireland a century ago.

 The lecture will be delivered bi-lingually. Presented in association with the Irish History Roundtable of New York. 

Thursday, Feb. 8
7:00–9:00 pm

Mick Moloney: “If It Wasn’t for the Irish and the Jews: Exploring Irish and Jewish Historical Musical Links and Influences on Musical Theatre, Vaudeville, Tin Pan Alley America”
Taking its title and inspiration from a catchy song composed in 1912 by William Jerome (real name: William Flannery) and Jean Schwartz, “If It Wasn’t for the Irish and the Jews” is an engrossing, entertaining, and insightful examination of this cross-pollination in a bygone era of U.S. cultural history. Former Broadway luminaries such as George M. Cohan (Irish ancestral surname: Keohane), Eddie Foy (real name: Edwin Fitzgerald), Norah Bayes (born Norah Goldberg), Tony Hart, Ed Harrigan, and Ada Jones populate Dr. Moloney’s richly illustrated talk on the nimble wit, socioeconomic observation, exuberant rhythms, melodic charm, and sentimental appeal pulsing through this under-appreciated chapter of American musical history. With a rich trove of visual illustrations and archival film footage, Moloney extends the musical discussion to the social backdrop of Irish-Jewish relationships in American film, theater, Tammany politics and organized crime in the prohibition era.

Thursday, March 1
7:00–9:00 pm
Free, but advance registration required.

Peter Behrens: “Families, Histories, Novels”

Peter Behrens’ first novel The Law of Dreams won the Governor-General’s Literary Award, Canada’s oldest and most prestigious book prize and is published in nine languages. The New York Times Book Review called his second novel, The O’Briens, "a major achievement" and Megan O’Grady, writing in Vogue, calls Carry Me, his latest novel, “another meditation on history and destiny . . . that make[s] the past feel stunningly close at hand.” Carry Me recently won The Vine Award for Canadian Jewish Literature.

"Behrens is a master, at home in the broad sweep of history and the intimate detail of a character’s experience. This is a novel that could be, should be, read in a hundred years." —The Jury 

A native of Montreal, Peter Behrens held a Wallace Stegner Fellowship at Stanford University and was a Fellow of Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Thursday, Mar. 8
7:00–9:00 pm

 

Storytelling: Celtic Mythology

18 Bleecker Street
New York, NY 10012

In ancient Ireland, tales of gods, warriors and magical spells were shared throughout the land. But a tale is only as good as its teller.

Spend an evening in the realm of epic transformations with world renowned storyteller, Laura Simms and two-time Gold Medal winner, Marianne McShane as they embody the characters and walk the landscapes of mythic tales, “Children of Lir” and “Diarmud and the Woman Beneath the Waves.” Post-performance, our storytellers are joined by Irish literature specialist, Jeff Cassvan of Queens College to discuss the meaning of ancient myths and the oral storytelling tradition, moderated by producer, Maura Kelly.

The storytelling series will continue in Fall 2018 with performance and customized workshops.

$20

Thursday, April 5, 2018

7:00 pm

 

Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops (1 point each)

Topics include:
Sentence Building and Avoiding Run-ons, Comma Splices, and Fragments
Using Correct Punctuation: Commas, Semicolons, and Colons
Subject-Verb Agreement, Verb Formation, Tense Usage

Club Hour Series:

Tuesday,  February 27

11:30 am to 12:45 pm Library L233A

Building Compound Sentences

Thursday, March 1

11:30 am to 12:45 pm
Bradley Ballroom

Building Compound Sentences

Tuesday,  March 6

11:30 am to 12:45 pm
Bradley Ballroom

Building Complex Sentences

Thursday, March 8

11:30 am to 12:45 pm Library L233A

Building Complex Sentences

Tuesday,  March 13

11:30 am to 12:45 pm
Bradley Ballroom

Subject-Verb Agreement

Tuesday,  March 20

11:30 am to 12:45 pm
Bradley Ballroom

The Verb Phrase

Tuesday,  April 3

11:30 am to 12:45 pm
Library L233A

Adjectives and Adjective Clauses

Wednesday Afternoon Series:

February 28

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Bradley Ballroom

Building Compound Sentences

March 7

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Bradley Ballroom

Building Complex Sentences

March 14

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Bradley Ballroom

Subject-Verb Agreement

March 21

2:00 pm to 3:15 pm
Bradley Ballroom

The Verb Phrase

Tuesday Evening Series:

February 13

5:30 pm to 6:50 pm
Room G223*

Verb Tenses

February 27

5:30 pm to 6:50 pm
Library L233A

Building Compound Sentences

March 6

5:30 pm to 6:50 pm
Library L233A

Building Complex Sentences

March 20

7:00 pm to 8:20 pm
Room TBA*

Nouns and Pronouns

April 3

7:00 pm to 8:20 pm
Library L233A

Punctuation

*Evening Activity Hour. Classes are cancelled but check with your instructor.

The Writing Centers are located in Bradley Hall (Bldg. Y) and on the second floor of the Library, room L233
572-7195 or 572-3595
wcenter@ncc.edu      www.ncc.edu/writingcenter

 

Writing Center MLA Research and Documentation Workshops (1 point)

Topics include:
Locating and Evaluating Sources
Integrating Sources into an Essay
Creating and Formatting a Works Cited List

MLA Sessions

Tuesday, April 10
w/Prof. D’Angelo
11:30 am–12:45 pm Bradley Hall Ballroom
Tuesday, April 17
w/Prof. Posillico
8:30–9:50 pm*

 *Evening Activity Hour

G Building, Room TBA*
Wednesday, April 18
w/Prof. D’Angelo
9:30–10:45 am Bradley Hall Ballroom
Tuesday, April 24
w/Prof. D’Angelo
11:30 am–12:45pm Bradley Hall Ballroom
Tuesday, April  24
w/Prof. Posillico
7:00–8:20 pm Library L233A
Tuesday, May 1
w/Prof. D’Angelo
11:30 am–12:45 pm Bradley Hall, Y216
Thursday, May 3
w/Prof. Posillico
11:30 am–12:45 pm Library L233A

 

*Evening Activity Hour. Classes are cancelled but check with your instructor.

 

Academic Success Workshops and Learning Skills Workshops (1 point each)
NCC Center for Educational and Retention Counseling

Includes:

Listening/Note-Taking
Studying for Classes
Reading College Textbooks
Test-Taking

Dates, Times, and Locations TBA

For questions, call 516-572-7141
CERC Office, Nassau Hall, M19

 

The Student Government Association (SGA) and the Honors Program present
Joshua Lafazan: Nassau Community College to Harvard Graduate School
Josh Lafazan, at 23 years of age, became Nassau County’s youngest-ever legislator in November 2017. He is currently serving his first term, representing Nassau County’s 18th District.

February 13
CCB Multi-Purpose Room
11:30

am

 

Three Small Masterpieces at the Irish Repertory Theatre:
The Pot of Broth by William Butler Yeats, in collaboration with Lady Gregory
The Rising of the Moon by Lady Gregory
Riders to the Sea by John Millington Synge

March 2–April 22


W. Scott McLucas Studio Theatre
132 West 22nd Street
New York, NY 10011

Tickets:
General Admission $50
Member price $40
212-727-2737

 

 

 

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GRADING:
Final grades will be determined as follows:

Attendance and Class Participation

10 points

Quizzes

10 points

Essays (2 @ 20 points each)

40 points

Midterm Exam

20 points

Final Exam

20 points

Extra Credit (if any) will be added to the final total.

Total Points earned (Final Average) will determine the grade received for the course, as follows:

Final Percentage

Final Grade

90–100+

A

8589

  B+

8084 B

7579

  C+

7074

C

6569

D+
6064 D

059

F

Note: Percentages ending in .5 or greater are rounded up. Therefore, 79.5 rounds to 80, a B, but 79.4 rounds to 79, a C+.

 

 

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SCHEDULE AND PROJECTED OUTLINE

 

IMPORTANT DATES: SPRING SEMESTER 2018
Monday, Jan. 19 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day – COLLEGE HOLIDAY – offices closed
Tuesday, Jan. 16 Day, Evening & Distance Education Classes Begin
Friday, Jan. 19 Weekend Classes Begin
Monday, Jan. 22 Last day Drop/Add
Monday, Feb. 5 Last day to drop full semester classes without a W grade
Friday, Feb. 16 Evening Classes Do Not Meet
Feb. 17-22 Presidents’ Day Recess - Classes Do Not Meet
Friday, Feb. 23 Day Classes Do Not Meet
Tuesday, Mar. 20 Evening Activity Hour: 7:00 pm class will not meet; all other classes follow a regular schedule
Mar. 26-31 Spring Recess - Classes Do Not Meet
Sunday, Apr. 1 Spring Recess - Classes Do Not Meet
Tuesday, Apr. 3 Last day automatic W full semester classes
Tuesday, Apr. 17 Evening Activity Hour: 8:30 pm class will not meet; all other classes follow a regular schedule
Wednesday, May 2 Evening Classes Extended By Five Minutes For Final Exams
Thursday, May 4 Evening Classes Extended By Five Minutes For Final Exams
Sunday, May 6 Weekend College ends
Monday, May 7 Evening Classes Extended By Five Minutes For Final Exams
Tuesday, May 8 Evening Classes Extended By Five Minutes For Final Exams

Evening classes end

Wednesday, May 9 ME – if necessary EVENING classes will meet
Thursday, May 10 ME – if necessary, EVENING classes will meet
Saturday, May 12 MW – if necessary, Saturday Weekend classes will meet
Sunday, May 13 MW – if necessary, Sunday Weekend classes will meet
Monday, May 14 Day, 2nd half semester & Distance Education classes end

ME – if necessary, EVENING classes will meet

Tuesday, May 15 MD – if necessary, DAY classes will meet
Wednesday, May 16 MD – if necessary, DAY classes will meet
Thursday, May 17 MD – if necessary, DAY classes will meet
Monday, May 21 Full, 2nd half semester & Distance Education classes transcripts available

Note: All dates subject to change;
See
Academic Student Calendar Spring 2018

 

 

Readings and Assignments:
Readings from The Oxford Book of Irish Short Stories are identified below by author and title as well as page numbers, e.g., Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973), “Her Table Spread” (Trevor 311-318). Selections from Dubliners are identified by title and page numbers, e.g., “The Sisters” (1-11). No page numbers are provided for The Playboy of the Western World and Dancing at Lughnasa; required readings are identified by act instead.

All readings below are required, and must be completed by the class indicated; the only exceptions are those indicated with an asterisk (*), which are recommended additional readings or resources. Poetry selections are not included in the books ordered for the class, but may be accessed through the links provided or will be distributed as handouts in class. Additional readings may also be assigned.

Red text indicates important dates or links to assignment descriptions; Blue text indicates links to assignments, resources, or online versions of texts. (Note: While every effort is made to verify the accuracy and usefulness of these links and their contents, no guarantees are made. Please notify me of any broken or outdated links at bmurphy@Brian-T-Murphy.com).

Note: This schedule is subject to revision according to the instructor’s discretion, the Academic Calendar for the semester, school closings due to inclement weather or other reasons, and the progress of the class. Additions or changes will be announced in class, and they will also be posted here as well as on the class Announcements page.

Date:  Readings and Assignments:

Mon., 15 Jan.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day: College Closed

Tue., 16 Jan.

Day, Evening & Distance Education (online) Classes Begin

Wed., 17 Jan.

 Course Introduction: Syllabus, texts, policies, assignments

Mon., 22 Jan.

 Easter 1916 Proclamation of Irish Republic
 James Joyce (1882-1941), Dubliners: The Sisters” (1-11)

*See also,
 “The Twentieth Century and After: Period Introduction Overview,
  “The Proclamation of the Irish Republic, 1916,” and
  Image of the original Proclamation
 and 
SparkNotes quiz: “The Sisters”

 *Recommended viewing:
 
Reading Ireland: Contemporary Irish Writers in the Context of Place
  The 1916 Easter Rising (The Great Courses)
  The Irish Civil War (The Great Courses)

Wed., 24 Jan.

 Dubliners continued:
 
An Encounter” (12-22), Araby” (23-30), Eveline (31-36)

 *See also,
  Barry, Dan. Singular Collection, Multiple Mysteries.” New York Times 27 June 2014: C20, 28.
 
Coleman, Patrick. “Printers, Bookleggers, and ’Spicy’ Books: James Joyce in the Book Industry.” The Writers Chronicle 46.4 (Feb. 2014): 34-42.
  Galchen, Rivka and Panka Mishrav. “Who Are James Joyce’s Modern Heirs? New York Times 28 Jan. 2014.
 
 Norton Online Quiz: "Araby"
  LitIQ Quiz A: "Araby"; LitIQ Quiz B: "Araby"
  LitIQ Quiz A: "Eveline"; LitIQ Quiz B: "Eveline"
  SparkNotes quiz: “An Encounter”
 
SparkNotes quiz: “Araby”
 
SparkNotes quiz: “Eveline”  

 *Recommended viewing: James Joyce: A Concise Biography; James Joyce’s Dublin: The Ulysses Tour ; The World of James Joyce ; Joyce, Yeats, and Wilde: A Conversation between Seamus Heaney and Richard Ellman

Mon., 29 Jan.

 Dubliners continued:

 Two Gallants” (45-57), The Boarding House” (58-66), A Little Cloud” (67-83), Counterparts” (84-97), Clay” (98-106)

 *See also,
 
SparkNotes quiz: “Two Gallants”
 
SparkNotes quiz: “The Boarding House”
 
SparkNotes quiz: “A Little Cloud”  
 
SparkNotes quiz: “Counterparts”
 
SparkNotes quiz: “Clay”

Wed., 31 Jan.

 Dubliners continued:

 “A Painful Case” (107-118), Ivy Day in the Committee Room” (119-138), The Dead” (183-236)

 *See also,
  
 Let Me Like a Soldier Fall.” Composer William Vincent Wallace, Librettist Edward Fitzball, Tenor vocal Evan Williams (1908)
  McCann, Colum.
What Time Is It Now, Where You Are? Washington Post 14 Nov. 2013.
 
O’Brien, Edna. Irish Revel” (Trevor 495-514)
  Norton Online Quiz: "The Dead"
  SparkNotes quiz: “A Painful Case”
  SparkNotes quiz: “Ivy Day in the Committee Room”
  SparkNotes quiz: “The Dead”
 

Mon., 5 Feb.  Possible viewing: The Dead (1987)

 Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973), Her Table Spread” (Trevor 311-318) ( Here in .pdf; portions also available here);
 Seán Ó Faoláin (1900–1991), “The Faithless Wife” and “The Sugawn Chair” (Trevor 318-337, 338-341)

 *See also,
  A sugawn chair (on the right)

Wed., 7 Feb.

 Essay 1 Due

  W. B. Yeats (1865-1939): selected poems (handout):
 “The Stolen Child,” “
When You Are Old,” “The Lake Isle of Innisfree,” and others...

 *See also,  Changeling.” (Wikipedia.org); J. Sheridan Le Fanu, The Child that Went with the Fairies.”
  “William Butler Yeats.” (Sacred-Texts.com)
   Walden by Henry David Thoreau  (here, or available used starting at $2.31 at Amazon.com); The Walden Woods Project: The Thoreau Institute at Walden Woods;
 
Joni Mitchell, “Big Yellow Taxi (live version); studio version here.

 *Recommended viewing:
  
W.B.Yeats: Poetry, 1910-1939;
  
W.B. Yeats: A Concise Biography;
  
A Fantastic Heart: Bob Geldof and Yeats;
  W.B.Yeats and the Irish Renaissance (The Great Courses);
  William Butler Yeats’ Love Poems Recited and Discussed I ((includes "The Rose of the World," "The Sorrow of Love," "When You Are Old,"
  "The Folly of Being Comforted," "The Arrow," "Reconciliation," "No Second Troy," "Peace," "Broken Dreams," "A Deep Sworn Vow," and "A Bronze Head")

Mon., 12 Feb.

 Yeats, selected poems continued
 
(Selections to be determined)

Wed., 14 Feb.

  Yeats, selected poems continued
 
Essay 1 returned

17–23 Feb.

 Classes do not meet

Mon., 26 Feb.

 Louis MacNeice  (1907-1963): selected poems (handout);

 *See also,  Cahill, Thomas. “What Was Found: How the Irish Saved Civilization.” How the Irish Saved Civilization: The Untold Story of Ireland’s Heroic Role from the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe. New York: Nan Talese/Doubleday, 1995. 147-196.

 *Recommended viewing:
  
"Prayer Before Birth" by Louis MacNeice
   (in MacNeice, Frost, Lear, and Williams

Wed., 28 Feb.

 Essay 1 Revisions Due

 Richard Murphy  (1927-2018): selected poems (handout)

 *See also,  Richard Murphy, Poet (obituary).” Telegraph (UK) 26 Feb. 2018
   “Poet Rchard Murphy Dies, Age 90.”  Irish Times 31 Jan. 2018.

Mon., 5 Mar.

 Richard Murphy: selected poems continued
Wed., 7 Mar.   No classes due to inclement weather
 
J. M. Synge (1871-1909), The Playboy of the Western World  (1907): read at least through Act I

Mon., 12 Mar.

 J. M. Synge (1871-1909), The Playboy of the Western World  (1907): read at least through Act I

 *See also, 
  Kiberd, Declan.
The Riotous History of The Playboy of the Western World.” The Guardian
  The Playboy of the Western World: Practice Quiz 1, Quiz 2, Quiz 3, Quiz 4

 *Recommended viewing:
  
The Playboy of the Western World (Druid Theatre Company of Galway)
;
   The Playboy of the Western World (The Great Courses)

Wed., 14 Mar.

 The Playboy of the Western World continued: read through Act II

Mon., 19 Mar.

  The Playboy of the Western World continued: read through Act III

Wed., 21 Mar.

 Midterm Exam, Poetry recitations (Extra credit)

 No classes due to inclement weather
 Midterm Exam: Short essays due (via email)

26 Mar.1 Apr.  SPRING BREAK – Classes do not meet

Mon., 2 Apr.

 Poetry recitations (Extra credit), Midterm Exam: Objective
Tue., 3 Apr.

 Last Day Automatic W

Wed., 4 Apr.

 Frank O’Connor (1903–1966), The Majesty of the Law” (also here), “Guests of the Nation” (.pdf, also here), (Trevor 342-353, 354-362);
 
Mary Lavin (1912-1996), Sarah” (Note: online text is incomplete) (Trevor 392-400);
 William Trevor (1928- ), “Death in Jerusalem” (Trevor 455-470)

Mon., 9 Apr.

 No class

Wed., 11 Apr.

 Essay 2 Topic Proposals due;
 
Midterm Revisions Due

 William Trevor (1928- ), “Death in Jerusalem” (Trevor 455-470);
 Brian Friel (1929-2015), “The Diviner” (Trevor 471-481);
 Edna O’Brien (1932-), Irish Revel” (Trevor 495-514);
 
John McGahern (1934-2006), “The Beginning of an Idea” (Trevor 526-540)

 *See also, 
   Anton Chekhov, “Oysters
    *Also, see also,  Pavel Chekov

 *Recommended viewing:
   “The Diviner” as read by Donal Donnelly, here

 
Irish Writers in America: Edna O’Brien;
  John McGahernRoscommon Landscape, Knockivar, and John McGahern: A Rural Writer?
   (from Reading Ireland: Contemporary Irish Writers in the Context of Place)

Mon., 16 Apr.

 Brian Friel (1929-2015), “The Diviner” (Trevor 471-481);
 Edna O’Brien (1932-), Irish Revel” (Trevor 495-514);
 
John McGahern (1934-2006), “The Beginning of an Idea” (Note: in online text, the story begins halfway down page 30) (Trevor 526-540)

 *See also, 
   Anton Chekhov, “Oysters
    *Also, see also,  Pavel Chekov

 *Recommended viewing:
   “The Diviner” as read by Donal Donnelly, here

 
Irish Writers in America: Edna O’Brien;
  John McGahernRoscommon Landscape, Knockivar, and John McGahern: A Rural Writer?
   (from Reading Ireland: Contemporary Irish Writers in the Context of Place)

Wed., 18 Apr.

 Essay 2 Due

 Thomas Kinsella (1928- ): selected poems (handout)

 *See also, 
  “Aogán Ó Rathaille.”  Wikipedia.org.
  Kurt Vile,
Pretty Pimpin.”
  Yeats, W. B.  “The Curse of Cromwell.” PoemHunter.com

Mon., 23 Apr.

  Essay 2 Due

  Kinsella, selected poems continued 

Wed., 25 Apr.

  Seamus Heaney  (1939-2013): selected poems (handout)

 *See also, 
  Quintus Horatius Flaccus, Odes I. 34 (from
The Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace. John Conington. trans. London. George Bell and Sons. 1882)
  Fawbert, David. Connecting with Seamus Heaney.
 
Information about
The Tollund Man and, more generally, “Bodies of the Bogs.Archaeology. Archaeology.org May 2010. Web.
  Lange, Karen E.
Tales from the Bog. National Geographic. Sep. 2007. Web.
  Murphy, Richard.
Poetry and Terror.” (rev. of North by Seamus Heaney) New York Review of Books. 30 Sep. 1976. Web.
  T.P. Tolland’s
Lagan Towpath (in Memory of Tom Carr),” showing his use of light and color, and the much darker (in both senses) “Boglands (for Seamus Heaney).
  as well as his obituary:
T.P. Flanagan: Artist and Teacher Whose Work Inspired Seamus Heaney.” The Independent (U.K.) 19 April 2011. Web.

 *Recommended viewing:
 
Seamus Heaney: Looking Back
;
  Seamus Heaney’s Poetry of Remembrance (The Great Courses)

Mon., 30 Apr.

  Heaney, selected poems continued

Wed., 2 May

  Heaney, selected poems continued

Mon., 7 May

  Class meets in the Haskell Room (Bradley Hall, upstairs)
 
Brian Friel (1929-2015),  Dancing at Lughnasa: read at least through Act 2;
 
Viewing: Dancing at Lughnasa.

*See also, 
 
Meredith, Fionola.
The Dark Heart of Dancing at Lughnasa.  Irish Times 25 Sep. 2015.

Wed., 9 May

  Class meets in the Haskell Room (Bradley Hall, upstairs)
  Dancing at Lughnasa continued: read through the end;
 
Colum McCann (1965- ), “Everything in This Country Must” (Handout; also here);
  Viewing: Dancing at Lughnasa, Everything in This Country Must.

*See also, 
 
Taylor, Charles.  
Cheerless in Ireland.” (Review).
 New York Times   19 March 200.5.

Mon., 14 May

 Poetry recitations (Extra credit)
 
Final Exam
Wed., May 16  Final Conferences
 Day & Distance Education Classes End

 

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TOPICS AND GENERAL ESSAY INSTRUCTIONS:

For each of the assigned essays, a topic or list of topic choices is provided. Your essay must be on one of the assigned topics for that assignment or developed in consultation with the instructor. All essays must be submitted on or before the due date, by the beginning of the class period; late work will not be accepted.

For each of the essays, select one of the topics to discuss in  a clear,  well-developed, coherent, thoughtful, and properly documented (MLA format) argumentative essay of at least five to seven pages (1250 words minimum), with a cover page and Works Cited page (cover page and Works Cited do not count toward the five- to seven-page requirement). The paper must be argumentative (persuasive), with a clear, explicit, and assertive thesis statement (underlined), must use a minimum of five to seven sources: up to three primary sources and a minimum of three to five secondary sources. Secondary sources must be scholarly criticism or analysis, not summaries, reviews, or “analysis” from sites such as e-Notes, SparkNotes, Wikipedia*, 123HelpMe, or Gradesaver.com; instead, use the library resources, including the available electronic databases such as Academic Search Complete, Literary Sources through Artemis, Literature Resource Center, Bloom’s Literary Reference, Literature Criticism Online, Humanities Source, Project MUSE - Standard Collection, MagillOnLiterature Plus, and JSTOR Arts & Sciences I Current Collection  to locate appropriate sources. To access the databases from home, click on the individual database link. Then, when prompted, enter your username (N #) and password (PIN). You must include at least one short quotation, one long—block—quotation, and one paraphrase, and these sources must be properly documented (utilizing MLA format), and integrated into your writing smoothly and correctly. See also Research Paper checklist.

* On use of Wikipedia in college-level research, see Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales on PBS NewsHour, here: “I don’t think at a university level it makes sense to cite any encyclopedia in an academic paper. That’s just not what an encyclopedia’s role is in the research process. Maybe if you’re in junior high, you know? If some kid out there is twelve years old and they wrote something and they put in a footnote, we should be thrilled, right? That’s his first start on the idea of crediting other people with ideas and things like that, but at the university level? No, it’s a bit junior high to cite an encyclopedia.”

Essays must contain quotations from or other references to your sources, and these references should be used to support your assertions about the text; you must include at least one short quotation, one long—block—quotation, and one paraphrase, and these sources must be properly documented (utilizing MLA format), and integrated into your writing smoothly and correctly. Essays must be submitted in a folder, including copies of all secondary sources used. Be sure to print out or photocopy all secondary sources, and highlight all relevant passages, whether quoted, paraphrased, or summarized. Failure to submit a complete folder according to these instructions will be grounds for failure on the assignment. In addition, plagiarism, either in whole or in part, will result in automatic failure (a grade of zero) for the assignment.

Please refer to the following as well:

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Formatting and Style Guide (Purdue Online Writing Lab)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Incorporating Sources (class handout)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Class Plagiarism Policy (on syllabus), as well as the Nassau Community College Policy on Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism (page 63 in the college catalog).

You might also find the following additional resources useful:

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Works Cited page (Instructions & Sample) (Microsoft Word document)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Avoiding Plagiarism (Houghton-Mifflin web site)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Practice Incorporating Sources into Your Work (Houghton-Mifflin web site)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   MLA format (Purdue university’s Online Writing Lab)

Be sure to focus carefully on the topic: formulate a strong, objectively worded thesis, and avoid plot summary. Remember that these are formal essays: they must have an appropriate, original title; contain an introduction, body, and conclusion; have a clear, explicit, assertive, objectively worded thesis statement; and avoid use of “I” or “you” throughout.

Also, one would think that this would not even need to be stated, but read the work or works about which you are writing, and read carefully! Do not rely upon your general impressions based on what you think was said in class, or on what you read online. There is no reason for your essays to contain factual errors.

Please feel free to communicate any concerns or questions to me before the essays are due; I will be available to meet with any student who needs assistance or additional instruction. Please speak to me before or after class or email me to set up an appointment during my office hours.

 

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Essay One: Due Wednesday, 7 February

In James Joyce’s Dubliners, several images, tropes, or themes recur. Select one of the following and discuss how Joyce develops the idea throughout several stories, how it changes or evolves, how and why it is important, and what it suggests both within the context of the story itself and in society as depicted by Joyce. You should also include examples of how the same idea is utilized in one or more additional short stories, including Elizabeth Bowen’s “Her Table Spread” and Seán Ó Faoláin’s “The Faithless Wife” and “The Sugawn Chair.”

  • Religion and the Priesthood

  • Family and Family Obligations

  • Coming of Age/Loss of Innocence

  • Ireland and “Irishness”

  • Another topic of your own choice. (See below.)

Please feel free to communicate any concerns or questions to me before the essays are due; I will be available to meet with any student who needs assistance or additional instruction. Please speak to me before or after class or email me to set up an appointment during my office hours. If you wish to write on a topic other than those listed here, approval must be obtained at least one full week in advance of the due date; topic proposals should be submitted by Wednesday, January 24.

 

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Midterm Exam: Wednesday, March 21
The final exam will consist of two parts, as follows, and may have built-in extra credit:

Part I: Objective (matching, multiple choice, True-False, and/or short answers), 55%
To be completed in class during regular class time, Monday, March 19 Wednesday, March 21 Monday, April 2

Part II: Short essays, 45% (three at 15 points each)
To be completed at home and submitted, typed, on Monday, March 19 Wednesday, March 21 via email or Thursday, March 22 in hardcopy
Instead of a traditional midterm essay, you should write three short essays of at least 250-300 words apiece. Essays must be typed, in 12-point Times New Roman, double-spaced, and stapled when submitted. Before you begin to write, take time to focus on your subject and to plan your essays carefully. Essays must have an appropriate, original title; contain an introduction (with an explicit, assertive thesis, underlined), body, and conclusion; and avoid use of I or you throughout. Your essay will, as always, be evaluated in terms of Main Idea, Organization, Support, and Diction and Mechanics. Therefore, make certain your essays are not only well organized and developed, but also free of errors in grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling.

Remember that you are not summarizing the works, but responding to them in a critical manner. Include evidence or examples from the specific texts that you are writing about, but do not retell the story, and do not copy directly except when quoting. Remember to incorporate sources correctly: use signal phrases and document with parenthetical citations and a Works Cited reference at the end of the essay.

You may use the texts themselves (textbook, printout, or online versions) and a dictionary and/or thesaurus (print, electronic, or online) for this essay, but no other materials or sources. Use of secondary sources, whether credited or not, will be considered grounds for failure.

 

 

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Essay Two: Due Wednesday, 18 April Monday, April 23
Select one of the following topics.

  1. Many of the same images, tropes, or themes seen in James Joyce’s Dubliners recur throughout later Irish literature, not only  in short fiction but also in poems and plays. Select one of the following and discuss how the idea is presented in the works of at least two or three authors other than Joyce; you must reference at least three or four different works. Do not merely indicate that the topic is present in the works, however. You must provide a clear, analytical statement about the use of the topic in the works, how the authors differ in their approach or intent, and so on. For example, poems from Richard Murphy could provide a counter-example in a discussion of nationalism and rebellion in Yeats’ poetry, or something from Bowen or Ó Faoláin could contrast with a reading of Synge.

(See for example Jack Lynch’s “Getting an A on an English Paper” at http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/EngPaper/, especially “The Thesis” and “Close Reading.”)

  • Religion and the Priesthood

  • Family and Family Obligations

  • Coming of Age/Loss of Innocence

  • Ireland and “Irishness”

  • Another topic of your own choice. (See below.)

  1. Select any one of the authors from the syllabus, and find one long work (a novel or play) or at least two to three short works (poems or short stories) by that author but which are not listed on the syllabus. For example, if you enjoyed reading Yeats’ poetry, you may elect to read and analyze his play The Death of Cuchulain or, if you enjoyed Friel’s Dancing at Lughnasa, consider reading Translations, The Home Place, or a selection of his short stories. Your essay should be a close, critical analysis of the work or works, showing familiarity with the selection, its context, and its significance, and demonstrate independent thought and research, including an argumentative thesis. Do not provide a biography of the author or a summary of the texts; instead, your thesis must be a claim about the work or works that represents your interpretation and that is supported with textual evidence. Your project  must address specific appropriate elements including (but not limited to)—depending on genre—plot or dramatic structure, setting, characterization, point of view, speaker or narrator, language (including figurative language or imagery, diction, and allusions) and for poetry, structure (including meter and rhyme scheme, or the lack of them), intended audience, and theme, as appropriate.
     

  2. If you wish to write on a topic other than those listed here, approval must be obtained at least one full week in advance of the due date; topic proposals should be submitted by Monday, April 9 Wednesday, April 11. You must develop and submit a clear, well-written, one-page explanation of the topic you have chosen, your reason for the selection, your focus and opinion, and an explicit, assertive preliminary thesis. This proposal may also include a preliminary idea of the plan of the paper, its intention or research question.

Your work should take the following form:
Topic: the specific topic you have selected
Rationale: why you have chosen to research and write about this particular topic.
Focus: a narrowed form of the subject, and the issue or debate involved.
Opinion: your subjective opinion on the debate or issue.
Preliminary Thesis: your opinion, worded objectively.

For example:
Topic: W. B. Yeats The Death of Cuchulain
Rationale: We read about Cuchulain in Prof. Anderson’s History of Ireland class last year, and she mentioned Yeats
’ use of mythology, too, so I’m curious about it.
Focus: How does Yeats use Irish legends in Cuchulain, and why? What is his intent?.
Opinion: I think that Yeats wants to rekindle an interest in Irish tradition and mythology, which were being ignored in favor of English versions.
Preliminary Thesis: In The Death of Cuchulain, Yeats rewrites Irish legend in order to emphasize the richness of his native tradition
, as a reaction against English dominance in art, politics, and religion.

Please feel free to communicate any concerns or questions to me before the essays are due; I will be available to meet with any student who needs assistance or additional instruction. Please speak to me before or after class or email me to set up an appointment during my office hours.

 

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Final Exam: In class, Monday, May 7 Monday, May 14
The final exam consists of multiple parts, with built-in extra credit, as follows:

Part I: Identification. (80%) Choose one of the following two options:

A: Matching, 4% each. Match each of the 22 passages with the appropriate author and title, using the key provided. Place the appropriate letter on the blank beside the number below.
(Built-in Extra Credit)

B: Short Answer, 16% each. Select any five (5) of the 22 passages. In a well-developed paragraph for each, identify the passage and discuss its significance. Include as much of the following as possible: author, title, speaker, or character described, situation, and how the passage is significant in the context of the work itself and/or its connection to other works, ideas, or themes. Be sure to focus carefully and avoid plot summary: do not merely retell the story. Paragraphs will be evaluated for the quality of writing, ideas, and expression, not for the ability to regurgitate the instructor’s comments. (You may identify a sixth passage for up to 10 points extra credit.)

Part II: Short responses. You must answer both. (10% each):

A. In a short essay (two or more paragraphs), explain what you have gained from this class and what text has been your favorite or the most personally significant to you this semester, and why. Be as specific and exact as possible in your selection and your explanation.

B. In a short paragraph or two, explain what you what you liked or disliked about the class; what you would like to see changed, expanded, deleted, et cetera. Note that this is a writing-intensive literature course, so this is not a question about the number of readings and written assignments, but rather about the content and organization of the course. There is no correct answer; this is for my information and course revisions only. All thoughtful, honest answers will receive credit.

 

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Links

Grammar, Writing, and Research Papers:

Prentice Hall’s iPractice

Study Guides and Strategies

Hodges’ Harbrace Handbook

College Writing Skills with Readings

Patterns for a Purpose

How to Write a Research Paper

Online English Grammar

More on Writing a Research Paper

A Guide to Grammar & Writing

MLA format

Another Guide to Grammar and Style

Getting an A on an English Paper

Plagiarism.org

TurnItIn.com

The Grammar Curmudgeon

Society for the Preservation of English Language and Literature

re: Writing for Literature

Additional Textbook Options:

Used Textbooks:

Bigwords.com 
Bookbyte.com 
Buyusedtextbooks.com 
Campusbooks.com 
CollegeSwapShop.com 
Ebay.com 
Half.com 
Halfvalue.com 
Textbooks.com 
TextbookX.com 
ValoreBooks.com

E-Books:

Bkstore.com (B&N) 
CampusBooks.com 
Coursesmart.com 
eCampus.com 
efollett.com 
Cengagebrain.com 
Pearsonhighered.com/student 
Wiley.com

Textbook Rental:

Bookrenter.com
Campusbookrentals.com
Chegg.com
Collegebookrenter.com
Rent-a-Textbook.com
Skoobit.com
Textbookrentals.com

Comparison Shopping:

Abebooks.com 
Addall.com 
Affordabook.com 
Alibris.com 
Allbookstores.com 
Amazon.com

Bestbookbuys.com 
Bigwords.com 
Bookfinder.com 
CampusBooks4Less.com 
Collegebooksnow.com 
DirectTextBook.com 
Half.com 
textbook.pricecomparison.com

The Cheap Textbook.com

Links to sites for textbook purchase or rental are provided for students seeking textbook options; no guarantees or recommendations concerning these services are intended, either express or implied.

Research Essay Links

Research should begin with the available electronic databases such as Academic Search Complete, InfoTrac General OneFile, Lexis-Nexis Academic, Opposing Viewpoints in Context, Points of View Reference Center, and CQ Researcher.

Especially useful should be Literary Sources through Artemis, Literature Resource Center, Bloom’s Literary Reference, Literature Criticism Online, Humanities Source, Project MUSE - Standard Collection, MagillOnLiterature Plus, and JSTOR Arts & Sciences I Current Collection.

To access the databases from home, click on the individual database link. Then, when prompted, enter your username (N #) and password (PIN).

Notify me of any broken or outdated links at bmurphy@Brian-T-Murphy.com.

Additional links may be provided.

 

 

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Last Revised Friday, 11 May 2018
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Main page:
www.Brian-T-Murphy.com

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