ENG 206: Modern British Literature, Spring 2018
Section MA: Monday and Wednesday
                   2:00-3:15 pm, South Hall 216

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 9th ed. Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Brian T. Murphy

Bradley Hall, Y-16
516-572-7718

e-mail: brian.murphy@ncc.edu

Schedule and Office Hours
 


 

 

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

 

Description

Objectives

Texts

Policies 

Assignments

 Grading 

Schedule

Links

Important Announcements and Updates: Click HERE
 

Print-friendly syllabus (Microsoft Word) here.

Other printable documents:
Model for Evaluation of Student Writing
 Works Cited page (Instructions & Sample)
Cover Page for Research Essays (Sample)
Standard MLA Format for Essays
Revision and Editing Checklist
Incorporating Sources
Paragraph Outline
Essay Outline

 

DESCRIPTION:
Students are introduced to major British writers from the late 18th through the early 21st centuries. Works of writers such as Wordsworth, Arnold, Dickens, Wilde, Woolf, Eliot, Yeats, Osborn, Lessing and Amis are studied in the context of their times and their literary and cultural values. Writing is an integral component of the course.

Prerequisites: ENG 102 or ENG 109.

This is an introductory course in British literature from the Romantic and Victorian periods to contemporary time. Students do not need to have taken ENG 205 (Early British Literature)  before taking this course; however, it is assumed that students have successfully completed the prerequisites for this course, ENG 100/101 and  ENG 102, or their equivalent.  Therefore, students are expected to have the necessary background and experience in analyzing, discussing, and responding to literature, as well as the ability to conduct independent research and to write correctly documented research essays  using MLA format.

Students are cautioned that this course requires extensive reading, writing, and discussions; students not prepared to read (up to 150 pages/week), to write on a regular basis, and to take an active part in class discussions should not consider taking this course.

 

OBJECTIVES:
 

Course Goals

Learning Outcomes

Writing Literacy: to produce precise, clear,   grammatically-correct, well-developed, and well-organized writing appropriate   to academic, social, and occupational fields

Produce coherent texts within common college level forms

Revise and improve such texts

Critical Thinking: to develop critical thinking skills

Identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments
  as they occur in their own and others’ work

Develop well-reasoned arguments

Informational Literacy: to develop skills to locate, evaluate,   and incorporate relevant source materials into the construction and   expression of an informed point of view

Access and utilize basic computer and   internet functions, demonstrating appropriate and effective utilization of   programs and functions

Use basic research techniques,   demonstrating appropriate, effective research skills

Locate, evaluate, organize, and   synthesize information from a variety of sources, demonstrating the ability   to implement an effective search strategy to obtain reliable information

Apply ethical and legal standards for use   of source information, demonstrating the application of accepted ethical and   legal restrictions on the use of published works

Cultural Literacy: to develop exposure to literary texts   that reflect the diversity of the human experience in a variety of historical   and cultural frameworks

Demonstrate understanding of the various   influences that shape perspectives, values, and identities

Demonstrate understanding of social   divisions such as gender, ability, ethnicity, and racial formations in a   pluralistic nation and world

Recognize the roles and responsibilities   of citizens in a diverse world

Aesthetic Literacy: to understand the role of literary art   as a craft that allows for the expression, enhancement, and questioning of the human experience

Identify creative techniques/craft   elements that shape aesthetic responses/meanings and be able to communicate   that information by using appropriate vocabulary

Interpret creative work through a variety of lenses such as knowledge of the creator’s work, the tradition the creator   is working within, the culture and history the work is embedded in, and the creator’s aims and intentions

 

Students will:

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Discuss the works of major British writers in the following contexts:
     ~  Literary periods (Romantic, Victorian, and Modern)
     ~  Social movements
     ~  Intellectual movements
ball.gif (137 bytes)  Trace the development of themes and genres within their historical contexts;
ball.gif (137 bytes)  Analyze literary works for their aesthetic features and thematic patterns;
ball.gif (137 bytes)  Identify styles, themes, and works of major writers;
ball.gif (137 bytes)  Examine a variety of critical approaches to literature.

TEXTS:*
Required: All required texts are available at the college bookstore. Anticipated bookstore prices are listed for each.

 

Greenblatt, Stephen, et. al., eds.  The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 9th ed.  Package 2.  New York: W. W. Norton, 2012, ISBN 978-0-393-91301-9.
Print, new: $79.80
Print, used: $63.05
Print, new rental: $65.85
Print, used rental: $37.90
(Available used starting at $48.50 at Amazon.com***)

Dickens, Charles.  Hard Times, Dover Thrift Edition. 978-0486419206.
Print, new: $5.70
Print, used: $4.50
Print, new rental: $3.90
Print, used rental: $2.70
eBook, buy: $1.00
(Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com***)

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Ed. Maurice Hindle. New York: Penguin, 2003. ISBN 978-0-141-43947-1.
Print, new: $9.50
Print, used: $7.50
Print, new rental: $6.45
Print, used rental: $4.45
(Available used starting at $2.42 at Amazon.com***)

Note: Any editions of Hard Times and Frankenstein are acceptable. However, those editions of Frankenstein based on the 1818 text, not the 1831, are preferred by most contemporary scholars. In addition, English majors—or anyone considering pursuing further literary studies—should consider purchasing the Norton Critical Editions version of Hard Times and Frankenstein, which contain authoritative texts, historical backgrounds and contexts, and a selection of useful criticism.

Supplemental readings and materials may be assigned at the instructor’s discretion.

Recommended Texts:

Hacker, Diana and Nancy Sommers. Rules for Writers, 7 ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2012. (Available used starting at $21.35 at Amazon.comhttps://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=briantmurph-20&l=ur2&o=1***)
or any other current college-level handbook including 2009 MLA updates.

A good college-level dictionary

Recommended additional texts:**
Ackroyd, Peter. Albion: The Origins of the English Imagination. New York: Nan A. Talese, 2002. (***)†

---. The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein. New York: Nan A. Talese, 2010. (Available starting at $14.85 at Amazon.com***)†

Baugh, Albert C. and Thomas Cable. A History of the English Language, 3 ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1978.

Bloom, Harold. How to Read and Why. New York: Scribner, 2000. (Available starting at $1.00 at Amazon.com***)

---., ed. Romanticism and Consciousness: Essays in Criticism. New York: W. W. Norton, 1970.

Casagrande, June. Grammar Snobs are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite. New York: Penguin, 2006. (Available starting at $4.27 at Amazon.com***)

Chandler, Alice K. A Dream of Order: The Medieval Ideal in Nineteenth-Century Literature. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1971. (Available starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com***)

Chevalier, Tracy. Burning Bright. New York: Dutton, 2007.

Crystal, David. The Stories of English. New York: Overlook Press, 2004.

---. Words, Words, Words. New York: Oxford U P, 2006. (Available used starting at $9.28 at Amazon.comhttp://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=briantmurph-20&l=ur2&o=1***)

Denby, David. Great Books: My Adventures with Homer, Rousseau, Woolf, and Other Indestructible Writers of the Western World. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996. (Available used, starting at $1.37, at Amazon.com***).

Dirda, Michael. Classics for Pleasure. Orlando, FL: Harcourt, 2007.

Fraser, Rebecca. The Story of Britain: From the Romans to the Present: A Narrative History. New York: W. W. Norton, 2005.

Fulghum, W. B. A Dictionary of Biblical Allusions in English Literature. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1965. (Available used, starting at $3.99, at Amazon.com ***).

Gaul, Marilyn. English Romanticism: The Human Context. New York: W. W. Norton, 1988.

Glut, Donald. F. The Frankenstein Archive: Essays on the Monster, the Myth, the Movies, and More. Jefferson, NC and London: McFarland, 2002. (Available used starting at $24.95 at Amazon.com).

Gould, Stephen Jay. “The Monster’s Human Nature.” Dinosaur in a Haystack: Reflections in Natural History. New York: Harmony, 1995. 53-62. (Available starting at $1.70 at Amazon.com***)

Haining, Peter, ed. The Frankenstein Omnibus. Edison, NJ: Chartwell, 1994. (Available used starting at $2.94 at Amazon.com).

Hoobler, Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler. The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein. New York: Little, Brown, 2006. (Available starting at $0.99 at Amazon.com)

Houghton, Walter E. The Victorian Frame of Mind, 1837-1870. New Haven and London: Yale U. P., 1985.

Judge, Lita. Mary's Monster: Love, Madness, and How Mary Shelley Created Frankenstein.  New York: Roaring Brook P, 2018. (Available used starting at $10.99 at Amazon.com).

LaValley, Albert J. “The Stage and Film Children of Frankenstein: A Survey.” The Endurance of Frankenstein: Essays on Mary Shelley’s Novel. Eds. George Levine and U. C. Knoepflmacher. Berkeley: U of California P, 1979. 243-248. (Available starting at $39.95 at Amazon.com***)

Levine, George and U. C. Knoepflmacher, eds. The Endurance of Frankenstein. Berkeley: U of California P, 1979. 243-248. (Available starting at $39.95 at Amazon.com***)

Marcus, Stephen. The Other Victorians: A Study of Sexuality and Pornography in Mid-Nineteenth-Century England. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1966. ( Available used starting at $18.53 at Amazon.com  ***)

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein: Classics Illustrated Deluxe Graphic Novels. Adapted by Marion Mousse. New York: Papercutz, 2009. (Available used starting at $3.19 at Amazon.com***).

Sisman, Adam. The Friendship: Wordsworth and Coleridge. New York: Viking, 2007.†

Sweet, Matthew. Inventing the Victorians: What We Think We Know About Them and Why We're Wrong. New York: St. Martin’s, 2001.(Available used starting at $4.47 at Amazon.com***)

Tropp, Martin. Mary Shelley’s Monster: The Story of Frankenstein. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1976. ( Available used starting at $2.97 at Amazon.com)

Utley, Stephen and Howard Waldrop. “Black as the Pit, from Pole to Pole.” New Dimensions 7, ed. Robert Silverberg. 1977. Republished in Eternal Lovecraft: The Persistence of HPL in Popular Culture. Ed. Jim Turner. Collinsville, IL: Golden Gryphon P, 1998. 243-278. (Available used starting at $10.14 at Amazon.com***).

*Note that all major reading selections for the semester are available online, as indicated by links (see Schedule, below). However, students must have a copy of the appropriate text(s) with them for each class session, whether they have purchased the textbook or printed out hardcopy from the Internet;  no excuses about computer or printer problems will be accepted. In addition,  although the three longer works (Frankenstein- the 1818 ed., Hard Times, and The Importance of Being Earnest) are also available online, students who do not purchase The Norton Anthology of English Literature should  obtain paperback versions or library copies.

** Recommended additional texts are not required purchases, and have not been ordered for the course; however, they provide—depending on the course— alternative readings, historical and cultural backgrounds, criticism, personal literary responses, or entertaining revisions. Students who find themselves becoming deeply interested in one or more of the required readings may find these interesting and/or useful. Texts indicated with a dagger (†) are only provisionally recommended, as I have not read these works yet, although they have received excellent reviews or recommendations.

*** Prices listed at Amazon.com do not include shipping, and are accurate as of posting date only; no guarantees of prices or availability are express or implied§.

 

 

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CLASS POLICIES:

Attendance:
As per the Nassau Community College attendance  policy,  “Students are expected to attend all classes. Absences due to illness or for other serious reasons may be excused at the discretion of the instructor. Students are advised that absences in excess of 10% of the total class meetings may result being dropped from the course” (page 67 in the 2014-2015 college catalog). Students must not only attend every class and lab meeting, but also arrive on time, be prepared, and take an active part in class (see Participation, below); students may be required to sign in each class session to verify their attendance. Excessive absences or latenesses will adversely affect your grade. Students unable to attend class should contact the instructor regarding their absence; in addition, students are responsible for submitting all work on time regardless of absences. In addition, once students get to class, they are expected to stay in the classroom until the class is over. Leaving class early or getting up in the middle of class is considered disruptive behavior and should happen only in extreme emergencies.

Classroom Behavior:
Students are expected to be present, prepared, attentive, and active participants in the learning process. As such, any distracting or inappropriate behavior or unauthorized use of electronic devices is strictly prohibited. Eating, sleeping, texting, or other inappropriate behavior will result in your being asked to leave the class. According to the “Student Code of Conduct,” “The College is committed to providing an atmosphere in which students have freedom to learn and engage in the search for truth, knowledge, and reason in accordance with the standards set forth by the academic community. Conduct that adversely affects a student’s responsible membership in the academic community shall result in appropriate disciplinary action.” Appropriate disciplinary action may include but is not limited to probation, suspension, and expulsion from the college. See the Nassau Community College “Classroom Management Policy” (page 24-5 in the college catalog) and “Student Code of Conduct” (pages 34-9 in the college catalog).

Plagiarism and Cheating:
Plagiarism includes copying or paraphrasing another’s words, ideas, or facts without crediting the source; submitting a paper written by someone else, either in whole or in part, as one’s own work; or submitting work previously submitted for another course or instructor. Plagiarism, cheating, or other forms of academic dishonesty on any assignment will result in failure (a grade of zero) for that assignment and may result in further disciplinary action, including but not limited to failure for the course and expulsion from the college. See the Nassau Community College policy on “Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism” (page 20 in the college catalog).

Essay Submission (General Essay Instructions):
For each of the assigned essays and projects, a topic or list of topic choices will be provided. Your work must be on one of the assigned topics for that assignment or developed in consultation with the instructor* or it will receive a grade of “F”.

*Note: You must obtain prior approval to write on topics other than those listed below; speak to me before or after class to set up an appointment during my office hours. Approval must be obtained at least one full week in advance of the due date. See details below.

All writing assignments must be received by the instructor on or before the due date, by the beginning of the class period, as indicated on the schedule, below. Essays submitted by email or otherwise submitted late will not be accepted; see below. All at-home work must be typed (in 12-point Times New Roman), double-spaced, with one-inch margins, and stapled when submitted. In-class work must be neatly printed in blue or black ink on loose-leaf composition paper or in bluebooks provided by the instructor and double-spaced§. All essays must also include a proper heading (see Purdue Online Writing Lab's Formatting and Style Guide), including Word Count; have an appropriate, original title; contain a clear, explicit, assertive, objectively worded thesis statement (thesis statements must be underlined); and (unless otherwise indicated) avoid use of I or you throughout. Finally, all work should be grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, spelling, and documentation, and will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing. Please refer to the Paragraph Outline or Essay Outline and Revising and Editing Checklist for additional assistance.

Also, one would think that this would not even need to be stated, but read the work or works about which you are writing, and read them carefully! Do not rely upon your general impressions based on what you think was said in class, or on what you read online. There is no reason for your essays to contain factual errors.

Please feel free to communicate any concerns or questions to me before the essays are due; I will be available to meet with any student who needs assistance or additional instruction. Please speak to me before or after class or email me to set up an appointment during my office hours.

§ On format, handwriting, and neatness, see Chase, Clinton I. “Essay Test Scoring: Interaction of Relevant Variables.” Journal of Educational Measurement 23.1 (1986): 33-41 and
   Marshall, Jon C. and Jerry M. Powers. “Writing Neatness, Composition Errors, and Essay Grades.” Journal of Educational Measurement 6.2 (1988): 306-324.

Revisions:
All failing essays may be revised and resubmitted by the due dates announced when the graded essays are returned. Essays receiving a passing grade may also be revised and resubmitted, but only after the student has met with the instructor during office hours (by appointment only) to discuss revisions. Revisions must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay (revisions should be based upon the Revising and Editing Checklist and relevant information from class and the textbooks), and must be submitted with the original graded essay and/or draft(s) attached as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, in the following  pattern:

·         Paragraph 1: Changes in content. What was added, deleted, or modified.

·         Paragraph 2: Changes in organization. What sentences, ideas, or paragraphs were moved, how things were rearranged, and why.

Evidence of substantial revision may result in a better grade for the assignment. If you did not submit a completed essay on time, or if you submit a plagiarized essay, you will receive a grade of zero and may not submit a “revision.”

Make-up Exams/Late Work:
All assignment deadlines and scheduled exam dates are provided at the beginning of the semester; therefore, no make-up opportunities will be offered or late work accepted, except under extraordinary circumstances with appropriate documentation, and late work will be penalized 10% for each day or portion thereof it is submitted after the due date. Note: As all work is due at the beginning of the class period, this includes work submitted on the due date after class has begun.

Excuses such as “crashed computers,” “lost flash drives,” or “empty printer ink cartridges” will not be accepted. All essays or work should be saved both on your computer’s hard drive and again on removable storage device as well as uploaded to cloud storage (OneDrive, et cetera). Students should also keep backup copies of all work submitted.

Disabilities and Accommodations:
If you have a physical, psychological, medical, or learning disability that may impact  your ability to carry  out assigned course work, I urge that you contact the Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD), Building U. (516 572-7241).  The counselors at CSD will review your concerns and determine reasonable accommodations you are entitled to by the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. All information and documentation of disability remain confidential.

 

 

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ASSIGNMENTS:
Attendance and Participation (10%):
As this class will combine both lecture and discussion, students are expected both to attend every session and to take an active part in class—joining in discussions and raising questions. Discussion is one of the best ways to clarify your understandings and to test your conclusions; therefore, it is imperative that all students participate regularly in order that we may together discover what each selection “means” to us. Open discussion always involves personal exposure, and thus the taking of risks: your ideas may not be the same as your fellow students’ or even the instructor’s. Yet as long as your points are honest and supportable, they will be respected by all of us in the classroom. Questions, discussion, disagreement, and laughter are all encouraged in this class (However, ridicule or scoffing is never tolerated).

Quizzes (10%):
With the exception of the first day, class may begin with a short (five- to ten-minute) quiz or writing assignment on the reading(s) for the day, at the instructor’s discretion. Quizzes missed due to tardiness may not be made up. At the end of the semester, the lowest quiz grade will be dropped. Total number of quizzes during the semester will determine the point value of each; that is, if 11 quizzes are given (lowest quiz grade will be dropped), each quiz is worth up to one full point.

Essays (2 @ 20%):
Students will complete two essays during the semester; topics should be selected from the list of suggestions provided (see Essay Topics, below) or developed in consultation with the instructor. Each should be at least five to seven pages (1250 words minimum), with a cover page and Works Cited page (cover page and Works Cited do not count toward the five- to seven-page requirement), and stapled when submitted.  The paper must be argumentative (persuasive), with a clear, explicit, and assertive thesis statement (underlined), and must use a minimum of five to seven sources, including at least one to three primary sources (the text or texts discussed) and three to five secondary sources. Essays should be grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, spelling, and documentation, and will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing. Please refer to the Essay Outline and Revising and Editing Checklist for additional assistance, as well as Writing About Literature, Writing a Literature Paper, and Getting an A on an English Paper.

Exams (2 @ 20%):
Students will complete two exams: an in-class midterm and a final during the designated final exam period. These exams will each evaluate students’ recognition and comprehension of material studied during the previous weeks, covering specific texts, literary themes, and cultural and historical backgrounds. The exams may combine objective questions and short essay answers, and students may be entitled to use notes or textbooks for the essay portion of the exams.

Poetic Recitation (2-4 points Extra Credit): Students may select and memorize one of the selections below to be recited in front of the class for extra credit. Memorization serves the student’s skills of reading lines carefully and making judgments about how particular passages can be interpreted. A single recitation is worth 2 points extra credit; a second recitation will earn an additional 2 points. There will be opportunities for recitation twice during the semester, on the day of the midterm and final exams; students must sign up for these dates at least one week in advance, as sufficient time must be allocated for completion of the exam.

Possible selections for Recitation 1 (Dates TBA):
ball.gif (137 bytes) Blake, London (132-3): 16 lines
ball.gif (137 bytes) Wordsworth, Expostulation and Reply(280-1): 32 lines
ball.gif (137 bytes) Wordsworth,  The Tables Turned(281-2): 32 lines
ball.gif (137 bytes) Byron, She Walks in Beauty (617-18): 18 lines
ball.gif (137 bytes) Shelley, Ozymandias (776): 14 lines
ball.gif (137 bytes) Keats,  Ode on a Grecian Urnll. 1-10, 41-50 (930-31): 20 lines
ball.gif (137 bytes) Tennyson, “Ulysses” ll. 44-70 (1170-72): 26 lines
ball.gif (137 bytes) Hopkins, God’s Grandeur” (1548): 14 lines

Possible selections for Recitation 2 (Dates TBA):
ball.gif (137 bytes) Owen, “Dulce et Decorum Est” (2037): 28 lines
ball.gif (137 bytes) Yeats, “The Second Coming” (2099): 22 lines
ball.gif (137 bytes) Eliot,  “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” ll. 1-22 (2524-27): 22 lines
ball.gif (137 bytes) Eliot, “The Hollow Men” I: ll. 1-18 (2543-46): 18 lines
ball.gif (137 bytes) Auden, “Musée des Beaux Arts” (2685): 21 lines
ball.gif (137 bytes) Others to be announced

Extra Credit (possibly various opportunities, at 1–2 points each):
In addition to Poetic Recitation, above, students may be notified of opportunities for extra credit during the semester, including attendance at various workshops or cultural events related to the class (Recommended Field Trips”). If students attend one or more of these events, and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), they can receive additional points: a single event and written response is usually worth 2 points extra credit; attendance at additional events will earn one additional point each.

Note: As a general rule, extra credit only helps if you have already completed all of the assigned work, and will not make up for missing an essay (or two, or three). Extra credit opportunities will be announced in class, and they will also be posted here as well as on the class Announcements page, so do not ask at the end of the semester for extra credit to bring your average up. Students asking for extra points or changes to their grade may have their grade reduced, instead.

Extra credit opportunities to date:

 

Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops (1 point each)
Sentence Building and Avoiding Run-ons, Comma Splices, and Fragments
Using Correct Punctuation: Commas, Semicolons, and Colons
Subject-Verb Agreement, Verb Formation, Tense Usage

Dates, Times, and Locations TBA

The Writing Centers are located in Bradley Hall (Bldg. Y) and on the second floor of the Library, room L233
572-7195 or 572-3595
wcenter@ncc.edu      www.ncc.edu/writingcenter

 

Writing Center MLA Research and Documentation Workshops (1 point)
Topics include: Locating and Evaluating Sources
Integrating Sources into an Essay
Creating and Formatting a Works Cited List

Dates, Times, and Locations TBA

Academic Success Workshops and Learning Skills Workshops (1 point each)
NCC Center for Educational and Retention Counseling

Includes:

Listening/Note-Taking
Studying for Classes
Reading College Textbooks
Test-Taking

Dates, Times, and Locations TBA

For questions, call 516-572-7141
CERC Office, Nassau Hall, M19

18 Bleecker Street
New York, NY 10012

Bedlam will present Shaw's Pygmalion, directed by Eric Tucker, beginning March 12. The six-week run will open March 27, with a closing date set for April 22.

George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion tells the story of Professor Henry Higgins and Cockney flower seller Eliza Doolittle. Higgins makes a bet that he can take Eliza from the gutters of London and pass her off as a society lady, and soon soon discovers that the task involves more than simply teaching her the right dialect in which to speak.

Monday, March 12, 2018–Sunday, April 22, 2018

 

 

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GRADING:
 

Final average will be calculated as follows:

Attendance and Class Participation

10 points

Quizzes

10 points

Essays (2 @ 20 points each)

40 points

Midterm Exam

20 points

Final Exam

20 points

Extra Credit (if any) will be added to the final total.

Final average will determine the grade received for the course, as follows:

Final Percentage

Final Grade

90–100+

A

8589

  B+

8084

B

7579

  C+

7074

C

6569

D+

6064

D

059

F

Note: Percentages ending in .5 or greater are rounded up. Therefore, 79.5 rounds to 80, a B, but 79.4 rounds to 79, a C+.

 

 

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SCHEDULE AND PROJECTED OUTLINE:

 

IMPORTANT DATES: SPRING SEMESTER 2018

Monday, Jan. 15

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day – COLLEGE HOLIDAY – offices closed

Tuesday, Jan. 16

Day, Evening & Distance Education Classes Begin

Friday, Jan. 19

Weekend Classes Begin

Monday, Jan. 22

Last day Drop/Add

Monday, Feb. 5

Last day to drop full semester classes without a W grade

Friday, Feb. 16

Evening Classes Do Not Meet

Feb. 17-22

Presidents’ Day Recess - Classes Do Not Meet

Friday, Feb. 23

Day Classes Do Not Meet

Tuesday, Mar. 20

Evening Activity Hour: 7:00 pm class will not meet; all other classes follow a regular schedule

Mar. 26-31

Spring Recess - Classes Do Not Meet

Sunday, Apr. 1

Spring Recess - Classes Do Not Meet

Tuesday, Apr. 3

Last day automatic W full semester classes

Tuesday, Apr. 17

Evening Activity Hour: 8:30 pm class will not meet; all other classes follow a regular schedule

Wednesday, May 2

Evening Classes Extended By Five Minutes For Final Exams

Thursday, May 4

Evening Classes Extended By Five Minutes For Final Exams

Sunday , May 6

Weekend College ends

Monday , May 7

Evening Classes Extended By Five Minutes For Final Exams

Tuesday , May 8

Evening Classes Extended By Five Minutes For Final Exams

Evening classes end

Wednesday , May 9

ME – if necessary EVENING classes will meet

Thursday , May 10

ME – if necessary, EVENING classes will meet

Saturday , May 12

MW – if necessary, Saturday Weekend classes will meet

Sunday , May 13

MW – if necessary, Sunday Weekend classes will meet

Monday , May 14

Day, 2nd half semester & Distance Education classes end

ME – if necessary, EVENING classes will meet

Tuesday , May 15

MD – if necessary, DAY classes will meet

Wednesday , May 16

MD – if necessary, DAY classes will meet

Thursday , May 17

MD – if necessary, DAY classes will meet

Monday , May 21

Full, 2nd half semester & Distance Education classes transcripts available

Note: All dates subject to change;
See
Academic Student Calendar Spring 2018

 

 


Projected Schedule of Readings and Assignments

Note: All readings below are required, and must be completed by the day indicated; the only exceptions are those indicated with an asterisk (*), which are recommended additional readings or resources.

Red text indicates due dates or links to assignments; Blue text indicates links to assignments, resources, or online versions of texts (Note: While every effort is made to verify the accuracy and usefulness of these links and their contents, no guarantees are made. Please notify me of any broken or outdated links at brian.murphy@ncc.edu).

Note: This schedule is subject to revision according to the instructor’s discretion, the Academic Calendar for the semester, school closings due to inclement weather or other reasons, and the progress of the class. Additions or changes will be announced in class, and they will also be posted here as well as on the class Announcements page.

 

Date:

 Readings and Assignments:

Mon., 15 Jan.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day: College Closed

Tue., 16 Jan.

Day, Evening & Distance Education (online) Classes Begin

Wed., 17 Jan.

 Introduction: Syllabus, texts, policies, assignments

Mon., 22 Jan.

 Last Day Drop/Add

 The Romantic Period and Timeline (2-30):

 The Revolution Controversy and the “Spirit of the Age” (183-4)

Edmund Burke: from Reflections on the Revolution in France (187-94)
Mary Wollstonecraft: from A Vindication of the Rights of Men (also here)
(194-99)
Thomas Paine: from Rights of Man
(199-203)
Mary Wollstonecraft: from A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (208-239)

Wed., 24 Jan.

 

 William Blake (112-116)

 From Songs of Innocence  (118-125) (see image of Blake’s engraving here):

 “Introduction” (see image here ), “The Lamb” (image), “The Little Black Boy” (image, also here),
 “The Chimney  Sweeper” (image), “Holy Thursday” (image )

 

*See also, Chevalier, Tracy. Burning Bright. New York: Dutton, 2007.

Mon., 29 Jan.

 

 Blake continued

 From Songs of Experience  (125-135) (see image here):

 “Introduction” (image), “Holy Thursday” (image), “The Chimney Sweeper” (image),
 “The Sick Rose” (image), “The Tyger” (image), “London” (image)

 

Wed., 31 Jan.

 William Wordsworth (270-72), from Lyrical Ballads: Preface - 1802 ed. (292-304); “We Are Seven” (278-9);
 “Expostulation and Reply” and “The Tables Turned” (280-282); “My Heart Leaps Up When I Behold” (335)

Mon., 5 Feb.

 Samuel Taylor Coleridge (437-9): The Lime-Tree Bower My Prison,” “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” 
 “Kubla Khan” (441-462); “Frost at Midnight” (477-79)

*See also, Goss, Theodora. “Singing of Mount Abora.” Lightspeed Science Fiction and Fantasy July 2012.
   Sisman, Adam. The Friendship: Wordsworth and Coleridge. New York: Viking, 2007.†
   Review of The Friendship: Eder, Richard. "Coleridge was Wordsworth’s Albatross." New York Times 15 March 2007: E9.

Wed., 7 Feb.

 George Gordon, Lord Byron (612-18): “She Walks in Beauty;
 Percy Shelley
(748-52): “Mutability,” “To Wordsworth,” “Ozymandias” (776); “To a Skylark” (834-6)

 *See also:
 
Horace Smith, “Ozymandias
  Theodora Goss, “Singing of Mount Abora.” Lightspeed Science Fiction and Fantasy July 2012.
  “Ancient Grammar Police

Mon., 12 Feb.

 John Keats (901-3): “On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer” (904); “ La Belle Dame Sans Merci ” (923-4);
 “Ode to a Nightingale,” “Ode on a Grecian Urn” (927-931)

Wed., 14 Feb.

 Mary Shelley (981-3): Frankenstein. Read at least Preface - 1818 ed; Introduction - 1831 ed; Vol. I.

 *See also:

 Edison Studios' Frankenstein (1910); also here

 Online quiz on Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

 Dirda, Michael. Mary Shelley. Classics for Pleasure. Orlando, FL: Harcourt, 2007. 185-88.

 LaValley, Albert J. “The Stage and Film Children of Frankenstein: A Survey.” The Endurance of Frankenstein. Eds. George Levine and U. C. Knoepflmacher. Berkeley: U of California P, 1979. 243-248.

 Gould, Stephen Jay. “The Monster’s Human Nature.” Dinosaur in a Haystack: Reflections in Natural History. New York: Harmony, 1995. 53-62.

 Hoobler, Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler. The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein. New York: Little, Brown, 2006.

 Utley, Stephen and Howard Waldrop. “Black as the Pit, from Pole to Pole.” New Dimensions 7, ed. Robert Silverberg. 1977. Republished in Eternal Lovecraft: The Persistence of HPL in Popular Culture. Ed. Jim Turner. Collinsville, IL: Golden Gryphon P, 1998. 243-278.

 Zakharieva, Bouriana. “Frankenstein of the Nineties: The Composite Body.” Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein, 2 ed. Ed. Johanna M. Smith. Boston: Bedford, 2000. 416-431.

17–23 Feb.

Classes do not meet

Mon., 26 Feb.

 Frankenstein continued: read at least through Vol. I

Wed., 28 Feb.

 Essay 1 Due

 Frankenstein continued: read at least through Vol. II

Mon., 5 Mar.

 Frankenstein continued: finish Vol. III

Wed., 7 Mar.

 The Victorian Age and Timeline (1016-1043)

Thomas Carlyle (1044-48): from Past and Present (1067-76)

John Stuart Mill (1086-88): from On Liberty (1095-1104)

Mon., 12 Mar.

 Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1156-59): “Ulysses,” “Break, Break, Break” (1170-74)

 Robert Browning (1275-8): “Rabbi Ben Ezra” (1322-8); “Fra Lippo Lippi” (1300-09); “My Last Duchess” (1282-3);
 Matthew Arnold
(1369-73): “Dover Beach” (1387)

 

* See also,  Gould, Stephen Jay. “Red in Tooth and Claw.” Natural History 101.11 (Nov. 1992): 14+. Reprinted as “The Tooth and Claw Centennial.” Dinosaur in a Haystack: Reflections in Natural History. New York: Harmony, 1995. 63-75.

Wed., 14 Mar.

 Gerard Manley Hopkins (1546-48): “God’s Grandeur” (1548); “Pied Beauty” (1551); “Spring and Fall” (1553-54);
 William Morris (1512-22): “The Defence of Guenevere

Mon., 19 Mar.

 Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Epic” ll. 1-51, 324-354 (1175-6); from The Idylls Of The King (1236-59):
 “The Coming of Arthur,” “The Passing of Arthur

 * See also,  Chandler, Alice K. A Dream of Order: The Medieval Ideal in Nineteenth-Century Literature. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1971.

Wed., 21 Mar.

Midterm Exam, Poetry recitations (Extra credit)

26 Mar.1 Apr.

 SPRING BREAK – Classes do not meet

Mon., 2 Apr.

 Industrialism: Progress or Decline? (1580-81)

Friedrich Engels: from The Great Towns (1589-97)
Henry Mayhew: from London Labour and the London Poor
(1601-3)
Annie Besant: The “White Slavery” of London Match Workers
(1603-5) (also here and here)

 The “Woman Question": The Victorian Debate about Gender (1607-10)

Sarah Stickney Ellis: from The Women of England: Their Social Duties and Domestic Habits (1610-12)
Harriet Martineau: from Autobiography
(1616-19) (also here)
Anonymous: “The Great Social Evil”
(1620-24) (see also cartoon from Punch, )
Dinah Maria Mulock: from A Woman’s Thoughts about Women
(1624-26)
John Stuart Mill: from The Subjection of Women [Chapter 1]
(1105-15) (also here)

* See also,  Rudder, Christian. Dataclysm: Who We Are (When We Think No One's Looking). [New York]: Crown, 2014.

Tue., 3 Apr.

 Last Day Automatic W

Wed., 4 Apr.

Charles Dickens: Hard Times

Mon., 9 Apr.

 Hard Times, continued

Wed., 11 Apr.

 Hard Times, continued

Mon., 16 Apr.

Essay 2 Topic Proposals due

 Late Victorians (1668-1671)
 Oscar Wilde (1720-1721): The Importance of Being Earnest (1733-1777)

Wed., 18 Apr.

 The Twentieth Century and After  and Timeline  (1886-1913)
 Empire and National Identity (1636-40)

Anonymous:  Proclamation of an Irish Republic (1646-47)
James Anthony Froud:
from  The English in the West Indies (1649-52)
John Jacob Thomas: from Froudacity (1652-54)
Joseph Chamberlain: from The True Conception of Empire
(1662-64)
John Hobson:
The Political Significance of Imperialism (1665-57)

 *Anonymous: Easter 1916 Proclamation of Irish Republic

Mon., 23 Apr.

 Voices from World War I (2016-18):

Siegfried Sassoon (2023-24): “They
Isaac Rosenberg (2029-31): “Break of Day in the Trenches,”  “Louse Hunting
Wilfred Owen (2034-37): “Anthem for Doomed Youth,” “Dulce et Decorum Est
*Rupert Brook (2018-2019): “The Soldier
*Jessie Pope, “Who's for the Game?” and “The Call

 

*See also:
  Boyd, William. “Why World War I Resonates.” New York Times 22 Jan. 2012.
  MacDonald, Lyn, ed. Anthem For Doomed Youth: Poets Of The Great War. London: Folio Society, 2000. Print.
  Pope, Jessi. Jessie Pope's War Poems (1915)

Wed., 25 Apr.

 Essay 2 Due
 W. B. Yeats (2082-2099): The Stolen Child,” The Lake Isle of Innisfree,”  “When You are Old," “Easter 1916,”
  “The Second Coming”;

 James Joyce (2276-2311): “Araby,” “The Dead

Mon., 30 Apr.

 T.S. Eliot (2521-2547): The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” “The Hollow Men,”  “Journey Of The Magi;
 W.H. Auden
(2677-2687): “Musée des Beaux Arts,” “In Memory of W. B. Yeats,” The Unknown Citizen,”
 “September 1, 1939

 *See also:
   Brueghel, Peter, Landscape with the Fall of Icarus, The Numbering at Bethlehem, Winter Landscape with a Bird Trap, and
   The Massacre of the Innocents

Wed., 2 May

 Voices from World War II (2704-2706)

 Virginia Woolf (2706-2710): from Three Guineas, “[As a Woman I Have No Country]”
 Pablo Picasso, “Guernica” (2711-2712)
 Henry Reed (2714-2715): from Lessons of the War, Naming of Parts
 Randall Jarrell  “Death of the Ball Turret Gunner” (handout)

 Nation, Race, and Language (2718-21)

 Claude McKay (2721-23): “Old England,” “If We Must Die”; “America” (handout)
 Grace Nichols (2751-54): “Epilog,” “ The Fat Black Woman Goes Shopping,” “Wherever I Hang Me Knickers

 *See also:
  
Treasures of the World: Guernica: Testimony of War. PBS.org
   Information about the Sperry Ball Turret
   Cheese Nips office commercial

Mon., 7 May

 Margaret Atwood (2967-82): “Death by Landscape [.pdf],” “Miss July Grows Older

 Seamus Heaney (2951-2967): “Digging,” “The Grauballe Man,” “Casualty,” “Clearances,” “Anything Can Happen

 *See also:

 Quintus Horatius Flaccus, Odes I. 34 (from The Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace. John Conington. trans. London. George Bell and Sons. 1882)

 Fawbert, David. Connecting with Seamus Heaney.

 Information about The Tollund Man and, more generally, “Bodies of the Bogs.” Archaeology. Archaeology.org May 2010. Web.

 T.P. Tolland’s “Lagan Towpath (in Memory of Tom Carr),” showing his use of light and color, and the much darker (in both senses) “Boglands (for Seamus Heaney).”

 as well as his obituary: “T.P. Flanagan: Artist and Teacher Whose Work Inspired Seamus Heaney.” The Independent (U.K.) 19 April 2011. Web.

Wed., 9 May

 Final Exam

Mon., 14 May

Day & Distance Education Classes End

 

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TOPICS AND GENERAL ESSAY INSTRUCTIONS:

For each of the assigned essays, a topic or list of topic choices is provided. Your essay must be on one of the assigned topics for that assignment or developed in consultation with the instructor. All essays must be submitted on or before the due date, by the beginning of the class period; late work will not be accepted.

For each of the essays, select one of the topics to discuss in  a clear,  well-developed, coherent, thoughtful, and properly documented (MLA format) argumentative essay of at least five to seven pages (1250 words minimum), with a cover page and Works Cited page (cover page and Works Cited do not count toward the five- to seven-page requirement). The paper must be argumentative (persuasive), with a clear, explicit, and assertive thesis statement (underlined), must use a minimum of five to seven sources: up to three primary sources and a minimum of three to five secondary sources. Secondary sources must be scholarly criticism or analysis, not summaries, reviews, or “analysis” from sites such as e-Notes, SparkNotes, Wikipedia*, 123HelpMe, or Gradesaver.com; instead, use the library resources, including the available electronic databases such as Academic Search Complete, Literary Sources through Artemis, Literature Resource Center, Bloom’s Literary Reference, Literature Criticism Online, Humanities Source, Project MUSE - Standard Collection, MagillOnLiterature Plus, and JSTOR Arts & Sciences I Current Collection  to locate appropriate sources. To access the databases from home, click on the individual database link. Then, when prompted, enter your username (N #) and password (PIN). You must include at least one short quotation, one long—block—quotation, and one paraphrase, and these sources must be properly documented (utilizing MLA format), and integrated into your writing smoothly and correctly. See also Research Paper checklist.

* On use of Wikipedia in college-level research, see Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales on PBS NewsHour, here: “I don’t think at a university level it makes sense to cite any encyclopedia in an academic paper. That’s just not what an encyclopedia’s role is in the research process. Maybe if you’re in junior high, you know? If some kid out there is twelve years old and they wrote something and they put in a footnote, we should be thrilled, right? That’s his first start on the idea of crediting other people with ideas and things like that, but at the university level? No, it’s a bit junior high to cite an encyclopedia.”

Essays must contain quotations from or other references to your sources, and these references should be used to support your assertions about the text; you must include at least one short quotation, one long—block—quotation, and one paraphrase, and these sources must be properly documented (utilizing MLA format), and integrated into your writing smoothly and correctly. Essays must be submitted in a folder, including copies of all secondary sources used. Be sure to print out or photocopy all secondary sources, and highlight all relevant passages, whether quoted, paraphrased, or summarized. Failure to submit a complete folder according to these instructions will be grounds for failure on the assignment. In addition, plagiarism, either in whole or in part, will result in automatic failure (a grade of zero) for the assignment.

Please refer to the following as well:

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Formatting and Style Guide (Purdue Online Writing Lab)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Incorporating Sources (class handout)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Class Plagiarism Policy (on syllabus), as well as the Nassau Community College Policy on Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism (page 63 in the college catalog).

You might also find the following additional resources useful:

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Works Cited page (Instructions & Sample) (Microsoft Word document)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Avoiding Plagiarism (Houghton-Mifflin web site)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   Practice Incorporating Sources into Your Work (Houghton-Mifflin web site)

ball2.gif (137 bytes)   MLA format (Purdue university's Online Writing Lab)

Be sure to focus carefully on the topic: formulate a strong, objectively worded thesis, and avoid plot summary. Remember that these are formal essays: they must have an appropriate, original title; contain an introduction, body, and conclusion; have a clear, explicit, assertive, objectively worded thesis statement; and avoid use of “I” or “you” throughout.

Also, one would think that this would not even need to be stated, but read the work or works about which you are writing, and read carefully! Do not rely upon your general impressions based on what you think was said in class, or on what you read online. There is no reason for your essays to contain factual errors.

Please feel free to communicate any concerns or questions to me before the essays are due; I will be available to meet with any student who needs assistance or additional instruction. Please speak to me before or after class or e-mail me to set up an appointment during my office hours.

Essay 1: Due Wednesday, 28 February

1.      Blake’s Songs of Innocence  and Songs of Experience present several complementary pairs of poems (for example, “The Lamb” and “The Tyger,” “The Chimney Sweeper” and “The Chimney Sweeper,”  “Holy Thursday” and “Holy Thursday”). How do these and other such paired poems, not only those discussed in class, illustrate Blake’s thesis that they show “Two Contrary States of the Human Soul"? You may include in your discussion Blake’s engravings in relation to this thesis.

2.      There is often a sudden change of mood or emotion in Wordsworth’s poetry. Explain why Wordsworth uses this technique, citing specific examples from several different works.

3.      Compare ideas of nature and natural processes in several of the Romantic poets; for example, does Keats use nature as a teacher the same way Coleridge and Wordsworth do in their poems? Or, compare Shelley’s “Ode to the West Wind” and Keats’s “To Autumn.” Explain your answer by using specific references to poems by each author.

4.      Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is subtitled “The Modern Prometheus"; in addition, she includes below the title an epigraph from Paradise Lost:
      Did I request thee, Maker, from my clay
      To mould me man? Did I solicit thee
      From Darkness to promote me?
In what way does Shelley draw upon the Prometheus myth and/or Paradise Lost in her novel? Why?

5.      An analytical essay of your own choosing, developed in consultation with the instructor, involving one or more works from the Romantic period. You must discuss the topic with me and you must develop and submit a clear, well-written, one- to two-page topic proposal for approval by Wednesday, 11 February. No essays on alternative topics will graded without the approved topic porposal attached. Proposals should include an explanation of the topic you have chosen, your reason for the selection, your focus and opinion, and a clear, well-written, explicit, and assertive preliminary thesis; you may also include a preliminary idea of the plan of the paper, its intention, or research question. Your work should take the following form:

Topic: the general topic selected.
Rationale: why you have chosen to research and write about this particular topic.
Focus: a narrowed form of the subject, and the issue, question, or debate involved.
Opinion: your subjective opinion on the debate or issue.
Thesis: your opinion, worded objectively.

Note: No essays on alternative topics will be graded without the approved topic proposal attached.

 

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Midterm Exam: Wednesday, 21 March
Details TBA.

 

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Essay 2: Due Wednesday, 25 April

1.      How does historical context shape the Victorian poets? That is, how are their themes, their understanding of poetry, their attitude towards life shaped and reflected by their era, and how does this distinguish them from the Romantic poets?

2.      In the nineteenth century, a number of poets adapted (or attempted) the Arthurian legends: not only Tennyson (The Idylls Of The King) and  Morris (“The Defence of Guenevere”), but also Matthew Arnold, A. C. Swinburne, et cetera. Compare the treatment of one or more specific Arthurian legends in several of the Victorian poets; for example, how is the story of Tristan and Iseult rewritten by various poets? Or, how does Morris’s treatment of Guenevere differ from Tennyson’s?

3.      Two concerns of the Victorian period were industrialism and its effects and “The Woman Question,” the debate about gender and the role of women. Compare the treatment of one of these themes in at least two different works not discussed in class.

4.      In The Metaphysical Poets (1921), T. S. Eliot states that the modern poet “must become more and more comprehensive, more allusive, more indirect, in order to force, to dislocate if necessary, language into his meaning.” Explain how Eliot and/or other modernist poets either adhere to or violate this principle, citing specific examples from several different works.

5.      The modernist period is, chronologically, closer to the Victorian age than to the early twenty-first century. Select a pair of nineteenth-century (Romantic or Victorian) and twentieth-century works and discuss their continuities and differences. In what respects, if any, is the twentieth-century work closer to our own era than the corresponding nineteenth-century work? Some possible pairings include Keats’s “Ode on Melancholy” and Hardy’s “The Darkling Thrush,” Arnold’s “Thyrsis: A Monody” and Auden’s “In Memory of W. B. Yeats,” Wordsworth’s “Ode: Intimations of Immortality” and Yeats’s “Among School Children,” and Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Woman  and Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own.

6.      An analytical essay of your own choosing, developed in consultation with the instructor, involving one or more works from the Victorian period, the twentieth century, or the twenty-first. As above, you must discuss the topic with me and you must develop and submit a clear, well-written, one- to two-page topic proposal for approval. The deadline for submission of proposals is Wednesday, 8 April. As above, no essays on alternative topics will be graded without the approved topic proposal attached.

 

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Final Exam: In class, Monday, May 7
The final exam will consist of three parts, with built-in extra credit, as follows:

Part I: Identification and short answers. Select any eight (8) of the passages provided. (10% each)
In a well-developed paragraph, identify each passage and discuss its significance. Include as much of the following as possible: author, title, speaker, or character described, situation, and how the passage is significant in the context of the work itself and/or its connection to other works, ideas, or themes. Be sure to focus carefully and avoid plot summary: do not merely retell the story. Paragraphs will be evaluated for the quality of writing, ideas, and expression, not for the ability to regurgitate the instructor’s comments. Extra Credit: You may identify up to two additional passages, 10 points each.

Note: This portion is subject to change. It may become select 5, at 15% each, or 6 at 12.5%, depending on class discussion.

Part II: Short responses (10% each)

A. TBA

B. TBA

 

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