ENG 270: Introduction to Poetry
Spring II 2013
Section 7502: Mon, Tue. & Thu. 9:15–11:30
                    Room C-253

Brian T. Murphy

LaGuardia Community College
Schedule and Office Hours
e-mail: bmurphy@Brian-T-Murphy.com
or bmurphy@lagcc.cuny.edu

Important Announcements and Updates

Monday, August 12:
I have finished grading revisions of the Research Essay project and the Final Exam and calculated and posted your final grades; you should be able to access them on CUNYFirst within twenty-four to forty-eight hours.

Tomorrow (Tuesday, August 13), we will meet (at 9:15 in Room  C-253) only for Final Conferences: you will sign in, get your final grade, and if you submitted a research essay revision, you may get that back. You may also see your bluebook if you wish, but you may not take your exam with you. All final exams are submitted to the English Department along with your grades and attendance rosters and, presumably, put into storage. When you check your grades, bear in mind that these grades already include extremely generous scaling wherever possible; if your adjusted average shows that you are almost at the next grade level, this is because you have already been given a generous bonus and your raw average is below that shown, sometimes significantly below. Therefore, do not ask for additional points or extra credit.

I will not stay for the full class period, so be on time!

Enjoy the break.

 

 

Wednesday, July 31:
I am adding a second chance for poetic recitation for extra credit. As before, students may select and memorize one of the selections below to recite in front of the class on Monday, August 5. A successful (perfect) recitation is worth 5 points extra credit; an incomplete, partial, or flawed recitation will earn between one and four points. (Note: If you have already recited, you may attempt a second poem—not the same poem a second time!—but only for up to two additional points this time.) Students must sign up to recite tomorrow. Note: As before, no more than two students may attempt to recite any one of these poems.

Selections for Recitation:

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Auden, Funeral Blues [Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone] (16): 16 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Cullen, “Yet Do I Marvel” (433): 14 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Dickinson, Because I Could Not Stop for Death (531): 24 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Hopkins, God’s Grandeur (552): 14 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Olds, “Sex Without Love (139): 24 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Owen, Dulce et Decorum Est (310): 28 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Shakespeare, [Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day?]” (173): 14 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Tennyson, Ulysses ll. 44-70 (576): 26 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Yeats, The Second Coming (594): 22 lines

In addition, revisions of Essay 2 are due tomorrow; revisions must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay (revisions should be based upon the Revising and Editing Checklist and relevant information from class and the textbooks), and must be submitted with the original graded essay attached. Evidence of substantial revision may result in a better grade for the assignment. 

 

Revisions of the Research Essay project will be due on Thursday, August 8. The complete folder, including the first graded draft and copies of all sources, must be submitted with your revision; incomplete submissions will not be graded, nor will there be any further opportunities to submit revisions after class. If you did not submit the Research Essay on time, you currently have a zero. If you still wish to receive any credit, you must bring a completed draft of the essay to the Writing Center, then revise that draft, and submit both copies in your folder on Thursday.

 

Monday, July 22:
As announced in class today, due to the lack of appropriate cultural events related to the class, I am adding the possibility of poetic recitation for extra credit. Students may select and memorize one of the selections below to be recited in front of the class on Monday, July 29 for extra credit. A successful (perfect) recitation is worth 5 points extra credit; an incomplete, partial, or flawed recitation will earn between one and four points. Students must sign up to recite in advance, as sufficient time must be allocated for everyone wishing to attempt one. Note: No more than two students may attempt to recite any one of these poems.

Selections for Recitation:

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Auden, Funeral Blues [Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone] (16): 16 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Cullen, “Yet Do I Marvel” (433): 14 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Dickinson, Because I Could Not Stop for Death (531): 24 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Hopkins, God’s Grandeur (552): 14 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Olds, “Sex Without Love (139): 24 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Owen, Dulce et Decorum Est (310): 28 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Shakespeare, [Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day?]” (173): 14 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Tennyson, Ulysses ll. 44-70 (576): 26 lines

ball.gif (137 bytes)  Yeats, The Second Coming (594): 22 lines

Also, on meter and scansion, see also Essay on Versification” and Understanding and Explicating Poetry.

 

Monday, July 15:
As discussed in class today, there are several important dates and changes to make note of:

  • Revisions of Essay 1 are due on Thursday, July 18.

  • Essay 2 is now due on Monday, July 22.

  • Poems selected for Essay 2 do not have to be from the textbook; however, if you choose poems or song lyrics that are not in the textbook, you must include copies of the poems (or lyrics) with your essay. In addition, you may use poems that are listed on the syllabus, so long as they have not been covered in class before the paper is due.

  • Finally, Thursday, July 18 is also the last day to officially withdraw from a class.

 

Wednesday, July 10:
Tomorrow will will change direction dramatically: after several classes of poems about love, lust, and seduction, we will begin reading and discussing poems about age, death, and mourning. I have decided to discuss the poems in the following order (admittedly, the distinction between the three topics is a bit nebulous or even arbitrary at times, but it does provide some structure):

Thursday, July 11
Poems about Age:

William Shakespeare,That time of year thou mayst in me behold (166)
Edna St. Vincent Millay,Sonnet XLIII: [What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why]  (269)
Roger McCough,
Here I Am (286)

Gerard Manley Hopkins, Spring and Fall (216)
 

Monday, July  15
Poems about Death:

Ben Jonson, “On My First Son (9)
John Donne, “Death, Be Not Proud” (533)
Henry King, “Sic Vita(174) [note: scroll down to the second poem on the page]
Emily Dickinson, “Because I Could Not Stop for Death (531)
Dylan Thomas, “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night (275)
Seamus Heaney, “Mid-Term Break (11)
 

Tuesday, July 16
Poems about Mourning:

Walt Whitman, “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d” (581)
W. H. Auden, “In Memory of W. B. Yeats” (408)
W. H. Auden, “Funeral Blues [Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone]” (16)
Margaret Atwood, “Death of a Young Son by Drowning” (71)

 

Monday, July 8:
As previously announced, Essay 1 is due on Tuesday, July 9. Your essay must be submitted at the beginning of the class period; late work will not be accepted, nor will essays be accepted via email. Failure to bring the required essay will result in a zero for the assignment, without opportunity for revisions. Also, if  you choose poems (or song lyrics) that are not in the textbook, you must include copies of the poems (or lyrics) with your essay.

 

Also, as indicated in class today, we will probably have a quiz tomorrow. Since I indicated that we would probably be looking at Christopher Marlowe’sThe Passionate Shepherd to His Love (390) and Sir Walter Ralegh’s The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd (397), in addition to one of the poems by John Donne, you might want to focus on them. Specifically, you might want to pay close attention to the poems structure, meter, rhyme scheme, language, imagery, speaker and auditor, and argument. You might also find the following information interesting and useful: “Philomela” (from Encyclopedia Mythica) “Philomela” (from the Ovid Metamorphoses Resource Page), and “Philomela” (from Wikipedia).

 

Finally, I have verified and corrected all of the links on the schedule for poems though Tuesday, July 16. Links for readings for July 18 and later still need to be verified.

 

Tuesday, July 2:
Saturday, July 6 is the last day to drop a class with no grade. After Saturday, you will receive a  grade of W if you withdraw from a course.

 

As announced in class, Essay 1 is no longer due on Monday, July 8. Instead, you have until Tuesday, July 9 to submit your essay. Also, as announced, the poems (or songs) you select do not have to be from the textbook; however, if you choose poems (or song lyrics) that are not in the textbook, you must include copies of the poems (or lyrics) with your essay. Also, if you are trying to find poems with which to work, select a pair of poems from “Some Provocative Pairings” on the Literature: A Portable Anthology website, or try one or more of the links below, and be sure to use only works from professional, recognized poets (or lyricists).

BP: British Poetry 1780-1910: A Hypertext Archive
CP: A Compendium of Poetry
ME: Modern English Collection, E-Text Center (U VA)
PA: Poetry Archives @ eMule.com
PB: Project Bartleby
PL: Poetry Archive at Plagiarist.com
PO: Poetry Online
RPO: Representative Poets Online

On Monday will continue to look at “Poems About Love,” so be sure you have read all of the poems listed, from Thomas Wyatt’sThey Flee from Me (87) to Adrienne Rich’s[My mouth hovers across your breasts](368).

 

Enjoy the holiday and have a great—and productive—weekend.

Sunday, June 30:
Monday we will continue to look at “Poems About Art and Poetry” and, after a brief introduction to writing about poetry, there will be a short in-class writing exercise. Therefore, be sure you have read John Keats’ “On the Sonnet” (261) and “Ode on a Grecian Urn (347), Marianne Moore’s “Poetry” (276-7), Ishmael Reed’s “beware: do not read this poem” (278), Adrienne Rich’s “Diving into the Wreck” (193), and Wallace Stevens’ “Anecdote of the Jar” (517).

 

Wednesday, June 26:
Class began on Tuesday, June 25; if you were absent, you must get the notes from a classmate. Also, familiarize yourself with the class page and the syllabus, especially the class policies and schedule. Note that by departmental and college policy, attendance is counted beginning with the first class period.

 

On Thursday, we will discuss How to Read a Poem, including some Elements of Poetry. We will also continue looking at the introductory poems listed on your syllabus (William Shakespeare’s “Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer’s Day?” through Lewis Carroll’s “Jabberwocky” and “Humpty Dumpty Explicates 'Jabberwocky'”). In addition, we will begin to look at the poems listed under Poems about Art and Poetry, so be sure to read them as well.

 

Note: I have verified and corrected all of the links for poems though Thursday, July 9. Links for readings after July 9 still need to be verified.

 

Monday, June 24:
Class begins tomorrow—Tuesday, June 25—promptly at 9:15.
Note that by departmental and college policy, attendance is counted beginning with the first class period.

 

Tuesday, June 18:
The main page and syllabus have been updated semester.
Note that links on the main page still need to be verified and corrected.

 

Monday, June 17:
The main page and syllabus will both be updated for the Spring II 2013 semester before the first day of classes.

 

 

 

Legal Notice and Disclaimer