ENG 251: Film and Literature
Fall 201
4
Section C2: Thursday, 8:30
11:15 am
                  North Annex 102

Brian T. Murphy

Nassau Community College
Schedule and Office Hours
e-mail: brian.murphy@ncc.edu

or bmurphy@Brian-T-Murphy.com
 

Important Announcements and Updates

Friday, December 18:
I have graded the final exam and optional revisions of research essay projects and posted your grades for the semester at MyNCC (login required) and below by ID number.

These grades contain generous scaling, including bonus points and adjustments, and all extra credit opportunities were announced in class and were also posted here as well as on the main page. Therefore, do not email me to ask about extra credit or other things you can do to bring your average up since you were  almost passing” or just one point away” from the A and so on; in reality, you were closer to five or six points away.

Final exams and research essay folders may be picked up in the Spring 2015 semester, by appointment only.

 

ID

Attendance Quizzes/ Writing Response Papers  Final Exam Research Topic Research Biblio Research Essay Final Average Final Grade
N00197307 100.0 70 67 B– 3 2.5 C– 81.07 B
N00693023 98.3 93 99 A 4.75 3 A 100.00 A
N00701521 W
N00708466 W
N00709518 93.3 88 91 A– 4.75 4.75 A– 100.00 A
N00733686 85.0 48 45 B– 3 0 B 63.93 D+
N00734422 96.7 64 48 A– 0 0 C– 62.20 D
N00734532 W
N00741328 88.3 41 46 C+ 3 3 C–/D 64.13 D+
N00758829 91.7 42 61 C–/D 0 0 C– 63.72 D+
N00768003 100.0 94 59 B+ 4.5 3.5 B– 82.14 B
N00768897 95.0 42 51 F 3.5 1.5 F 57.16 F
N00770169 W
N00772010 W
N00776449 58.3 22 29 0 0 2.75 0 27.20 UW
N00778883 98.3 64 59 C–/D 3 2.5 F 65.43 D+
N00780369 100.0 100 84 F 4.5 3.5 B– 91.83 A
N00781323 31.7 31 0 0 0 4 0 11.15 UW
N00782500 W
N00783224 93.3 35 63 C+ 4 2.25 C– 74.35 C
N00789583 26.7 36 0 0 3.5 0 0 13.40 F
N00792617 W
N00797478 85.0 26 55 F 4 0 C 50.93 F
N00800138 93.3 101 85 C+ 4.75 3.5 B– 93.99 A
N00800759 80.0 29 76 C– 4.75 4.25 C 76.19 C+
N00801662 91.7 55 34 C 4.25 2 C– 56.70 F
N00810458 80.0 17 69 D 0 0 C–/D 57.02 F
N00810942 W

 

 

Tuesday, December 16:
On Thursday, December 18, the class will meet to complete the final exam for the class, evaluating students’ recognition and comprehension of material studied during the previous weeks. As announced, the exam will consist of two parts, objective (multiple choice) and short essays. The first part (objective) is closed book: no books, notes, electronic devices, or any other materials may be used; students using any devices or other materials or with anything on their desks other than the exam itself will receive a zero. You may use a dictionary and/or thesaurus during the short essay portion of the exam only, and the actual texts themselves (books or handouts only), but no other materials, either electronic or hard-copy. This is not a research essays; use of secondary sources, whether credited or not, will be considered grounds for failure.

In addition, optional revisions of the research essay projects are due in class Thursday, at the start of the class period. As per the syllabus and as announced in class, all failing essays may be revised; essays receiving a passing grade may also be revised and resubmitted, but only after the student has met with the instructor during office hours to discuss revisions. If you wish your research essay  to be returned to you, you must submit it with a self-addressed stamped envelope, including sufficient postage, and I will mail  it to you during the break. Otherwise, research essay folders may be picked up in the Spring 2015 semester, by appointment only.

Once final grades have been calculated—by Friday afternoon, ideally—your grades will be available online, both here (by Student ID number) and at MyNCC (login required). Therefore, do not email me to ask about your grade, or to ask for extra credit to bring your average up; final grades will already contain generous scaling, and all extra credit opportunities were announced in class and were also posted here as well as on the main page.

Thursday, December 11:
Completed research essay projects were today. Students who were surprised that their essays did not receive the grades they had hoped for are reminded to look at the syllabus. All the specific details concerning the project and grading policies were available and were discussed beginning in September.

In addition, several students were surprised by their projected grades, despite grade projections having been available almost every class for the past eight weeks. All projections are based on work submitted to date, including attendance and class participation, quizzes, a minimum of five response papers, and the research paper project: topic selection, annotated bibliography, and final draft, submitted in a folder with photocopies or printouts of all sources and supporting materials.

As a reminder, students who received a grade of F may submit a revision next Thursday; students who received a passing grade (D or better) may also submit a revision, but only after meeting with me during office hours (by appointment only) to discuss revisions. I am currently still free next Monday, from 11:00 to 12:00.

Revisions must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay (revisions should be based upon the Revising and Editing Checklist and relevant information from class), and must be submitted with the original graded essay and/or draft(s) attached. Evidence of substantial revision may result in a better grade for the assignment. 

If you did not submit a completed research essay on time, you have a grade of 0 and may not submit a “revision.”

Thursday, December 4:
As a reminder, your completed research essay project was due today. As per the syllabus, research essays must be at least seven to twelve pages (a minimum of 1500-2500 words), using a minimum of five to seven primary or secondary sources, correctly documented utilizing MLA format, with a cover page and Works Cited page (cover page and Works Cited do not count toward the seven-page requirement). In addition, the final research essay must be submitted in a folder with all supporting materials: photocopies or printouts of all secondary sources, preliminary thesis, annotated bibliography, outline–if you have completed one–and any preliminary drafts. Failure to submit the complete folder as required on the due date will result in a grade of zero. As announced in class today, if you are missing any of the required materials, you have until tomorrow at 12:00 noon to submit them. Only materials placed iu my mailbox in the faculty mailroom in Bradley Hall before noon on Friday will be accepted.

Finally, as a reminder: the period for Automatic Withdrawal ended three weeks ago, on Friday, November 7.

Sunday, November 30:
The final two response paper topics, for Thursday, Dec. 4 and Thursday, Dec. 11, have both been posted on the main page.
As per the
syllabus, students are responsible for submitting at least five
response papers, out of eighteen total choices.
e
ach response paper is worth 8% of your final grade;

Remember, for Thursday, Dec. 4, be sure to finish reading at least through Part One of Carrie (Blood Sport).

Your completed research essay project is also due the same day, so budget your time carefully. Research essays must be at least seven to twelve pages (a minimum of 1500-2500 words), using a minimum of five to seven primary or secondary sources (secondary sources must be reliable: scholarly criticism or analysis, not summaries, reviews, or “analysis” from sites such as e-Notes, SparkNotes, Wikipedia, 123HelpMe, or Gradesaver.com), correctly documented utilizing MLA format (see also Documenting Films in MLA Style), with a cover page and Works Cited page (cover page and Works Cited do not count toward the seven-page requirement). In addition, the final research essay must be submitted in a folder with all supporting materials: photocopies or printouts of all secondary sources, preliminary thesis, preliminary bibliography, outline–if you have completed one–and any preliminary drafts. Failure to bring the required essay on the due date will result in a zero for the assignment.

Finally, as a reminder: the period for Automatic Withdrawal ended three weeks ago, on Friday, November 7.

Sunday, November 23:
As per the Academic Calendar and the syllabus, and as repeatedly announced in class, this week classes will follow a modified schedule:

On Monday, Nov. 24, classes meet according to a Thursday schedule.

On Tuesday, Nov. 25, classes meet normally.

One Wednesday, Nov. 26, classes meet according to a Friday schedule; Evening classes do not meet.

The additional response paper topic choice for Thursday, Dec. 4, on Carrie by Stephen King, has been posted on the main page. This is most likely the penultimate topic, so plan accordingly.

Remember, response papers should be at least two to three pages (500-750 words). include independent analysis and demonstrate careful thought, but no research is necessary, nor should any secondary sources be used. This is not a research essay; the only sources utilized or quoted should be the texts themselves. Use of secondary sources, whether credited or not, will be considered grounds for failure. Although these are personal responses, and therefore there is no "correct" answer, remember that they are still formal essays: in your analyses, formulate a clear, explicit, assertive (persuasive), objectively-worded thesis statement, and avoid use of "I" or "you" throughout. Do not attempt to address all aspects of the text, but carefully focus your topic, and avoid merely paraphrasing or summarizing the work. Be sure to support your answers with specific references to the work. Essays must be typed, double-spaced, and grammatically correct; essays will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing.

Finally, for Thursday, Dec. 4, be sure to finish reading at least through Part One of Carrie (Blood Sport). Your completed research essay project is also due the same day, so budget your time carefully.

Thursday, November 6:
The additional response paper topic choices have been posted on the main page. Remember, response papers should be at least two to three pages (500-750 words). include independent analysis and demonstrate careful thought, but no research is necessary, nor should any secondary sources be used. This is not a research essay; the only sources utilized or quoted should be the texts themselves. Use of secondary sources, whether credited or not, will be considered grounds for failure. Although these are personal responses, and therefore there is no "correct" answer, remember that they are still formal essays: in your analyses, formulate a clear, explicit, assertive (persuasive), objectively-worded thesis statement, and avoid use of "I" or "you" throughout. Do not attempt to address all aspects of the text, but carefully focus your topic, and avoid merely paraphrasing or summarizing the work. Be sure to support your answers with specific references to the work. Essays must be typed, double-spaced, and grammatically correct; essays will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing.

Be sure to finish reading at least through Part One of Rosemary's Baby for next class.

Thursday, October 23:
The additional response paper topic choice has been posted on the main page, as well as below. If you choose to complete this response paper, it is due on Thursday, October 30. Remember, response papers should be at least two to three pages (500-750 words). include independent analysis and demonstrate careful thought, but no research is necessary, nor should any secondary sources be used. This is not a research essay; the only sources utilized or quoted should be the texts themselves. Use of secondary sources, whether credited or not, will be considered grounds for failure. Although these are personal responses, and therefore there is no "correct" answer, remember that they are still formal essays: in your analyses, formulate a clear, explicit, assertive (persuasive), objectively-worded thesis statement, and avoid use of "I" or "you" throughout. Do not attempt to address all aspects of the text, but carefully focus your topic, and avoid merely paraphrasing or summarizing the work. Be sure to support your answers with specific references to the work. Essays must be typed, double-spaced, and grammatically correct; essays will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing.

Additional response paper topic choice 6.2 Due Thursday, 30 October:
Contrast Kurt Neumann's The Fly with David Cronenburg's 1986 remake, focusing on one of these two ideas:

a. Character: Andre Delambre versus Seth Brundle.
How do the protagonists of the two versions differ? Who is each character, what is he like, in terms of personality, background, motivation? What does this difference suggest about science, scientists, and their role(s) in society?

b. The Role of the Female: Helene versus Veronica.
An obvious, reductive reading of The Fly (1958) and The Fly (1986) would present Geena Davis, in the role of Veronica, a "modern" woman, as strong, active, and "empowered"; it would also see Helene as a "traditional housewife" (whatever that means). However, in what ways is Veronica—or the 1986 movie itself—also a reactionary depiction of women? Is Veronica somehow regressive, traditional? How and why?

Wednesday, October 22:
It's a bit late to be posting this, but I seldom read The Atlantic and so just became aware of this list today. At least you can see what's on for the rest of the month; for example, Night of the Lepus is on TCM  at 6:00 am tomorrow!

Every Horror Movie on TV this October from The Atlantic

Friday, October 17:
As of Monday, October 20, my office will be Y-203 in Bradley Hall, instead of Y-219
Office Hours will remain the same as previously posted, however: Wednesday and Friday, 11:00 am–12:15 pm, with additional hours by appointment only.

Tuesday, October 7:
I have posted the following additional Extra Credit information on the main page:

Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops continue through November 4; see the updated flyer with revised information here.

Also, in addition to “Tomorrow is Now: You in Cyberspace” (Monday, Oct. 13), NCC’s First Year Experience is presenting two more upcoming events:

1980s Film Festival

Star Wars  at 9:30 am
Tron at 12:30 pm
The Goonies  at 3:30 pm

Wednesday, October 29, 2014
11:00 AM to 12:15 PM
CCB 252-253
Administrators, faculty, students, classes, and staff are welcome and encouraged to attend.
See poster, here.

While strictly speaking none of these films are directly related to our class, they are all iconic films in their own ways.
If you attend one or more of the showings, and provide evidence of attendance along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), you can earn up to one point each.

Thursday, October 2:
I have posted the two new response paper topic choices on the main page. Response paper topic 4 is due next class, Thursday, October 9; it asks you to address Matheson's novel and his response to the 1961/1964 film, The Last Man on Earth. Response paper topic 5, however, requires you to discuss the text and both The Last Man on Earth and I Am Legend (2007). Therefore, it is not due until the following week, on Thursday, October 16, after we have seen I Am Legend in class.

Wednesday, October 1:
As a point of clarification, the response paper topic due tomorrow refers to the novel I Am Legend by Richard Matheson, not the movie:

While Richard Matheson's I Am Legend is clearly a precursor to many of today's vampire and zombie films, it is also squarely within the traditional literary genre of survival narratives, from Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe (and the story of Alexander Selkirk from which it derives) through The Swiss Family Robinson, Castaway starring Tom Hanks, and even in some ways Cormac McCarthy's novel The Road. Discuss I Am Legend [the novel, not the movie] in terms of the protagonist's struggle to survive, with reference to the basic needs of food, shelter, and so on. How is more akin to say, Robinson Crusoe than to Dracula, The Walking Dead, or other similar horror novels, movies, and programs?

Tuesday, September 30:
As we have not met since September 18, you have had plenty of time to read I Am Legend Parts One and Two (Chapters 1–14) by Richard Matheson.
Therefore, y
ou should expect a quiz, at least.

I will also return and discuss your Research Project Topics, as well as discussing the process of conducting research and finding appropriate sources for this assignment.

In addition, it might be of interest to note that Allium sativum, or garlic, is a species in the onion genus, Allium. Its close relatives include the leek, onion, shallot, and chive.

And finally, in The HΩmega Man,” from The Simpsons episode 5F02, “Treehouse of Horror VIII”: in a parody of The Ωmega Man with Charlton Heston (1971), based on Matheson’s I Am Legend, Homer is apparently the last person alive in Springfield—after France uses a neutron bomb, in retaliation for Mayor Quimby’s jokes about frog legs—until he discovers that many of Springfield’s residents have become weird robe-wearing mutant zombie things.

Friday, September 19:
I have posted information about Writing Center workshops on the main page, under Extra Credit. Remember, if you attend one or more of these events, and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), you can receive additional points: a single event and written response is worth 2 points extra credit; attendance at additional events will earn one additional point each. Note: you may not attend the same workshops two or more times for additional extra credit!

Thursday, September 18:
I have the additional Response Paper topic on the main page. In general, it covers the differences between The Thing from Another World and The Thing. As always, this response should include independent analysis and demonstrate careful thought, but no research is necessary, nor should any secondary sources be used. This is not a research essay; the only sources utilized or quoted should be the texts themselves. Use of secondary sources, whether credited or not, will be considered grounds for failure. Although these are personal responses, and therefore there is no "correct" answer, remember that they are still formal essays: in your analyses, formulate a clear, explicit, assertive (persuasive), objectively-worded thesis statement, and avoid use of "I" or "you" throughout. Do not attempt to address all aspects of the text, but carefully focus your topic, and avoid merely paraphrasing or summarizing the work.

Also, remember “The Speech”? The count is now two.

Sunday, September 14:
I have posted information about the additional Response Paper topic on the main page. If you choose to write on this topic, it is due at the start of class on Thursday. In addition, your Research Paper Topic Selection is also due at the start of class on Thursday. Be sure to follow instructions carefully.

Also, as noted in class, consider the following for the discussion on Thursday. How does the 1951 movie The Thing from Another World differ from the original “Who Goes There? by John W. Campbell? What changes are introduced, and why? Think about the presence of the newspaper reporter, and the potential conflicts introduced; the civilian scientist, including his appearance and behavior, in opposition to the military characters; Miss Nicholson, a strong, dominant female character; and the creature itself, including its description, appearance, and nature. Also consider the level of violence or “body horror” (or lack thereof), especially in terms of cultural norms and cinematic technology of the early 1950s. Finally, consider the elements familiar to viewers of films from the 1940s and 1950s that may seem dated, unusual, or even jarring today: the film techniques, sets, special effects, acting, and music. Also note the prevalence of smoking, the contemporary historical or scientific references (such as Bikini), the overlapping dialogue in some scenes (reminiscent of some films by Robert Altman), and the standard burning stuntman running away, an image duplicated repeatedly even in today's films.

Saturday, September 6:
As announced in class, you should read Who Goes There? by John W. Campbell before next class. In addition, if you choose to submit Response Paper 1, it is due at the start of class next week:

In “Who Goes There? "Real Men Only' (The Free Library. 2005 Extrapolation 03 Sep. 2014), the author suggests that a central concern of John W. Campbell's story is the boundary between self and other, between human and non-human, and the precariousness of this boundary. The article asserts, “the thing challenges our ideas of human self in two ways: first, it challenges the idea that self is unique and contained given that the thing can imitate any self and that its 'self' only grows by taking over and becoming others; second, the thing challenges our idea of the human as something defined through its differences from animals, as the thing becomes either with equal ease.” Explore the concept of selfhood and individuality as expressed in Campbell's Who Goes There?” How might this concern reflect elements of the culture of the late 1930s? You might consider demographic, sociological, or even political changes in the period.

Remember, students are only required to complete a minimum of five response papers during the semester, so if this topic does not appeal to you, do not feel you must write it. Additional response paper topics will be posted as the semester progresses.

Be sure to read the syllabus carefully and to follow directions.

 

 

Wednesday, August 13, 2014:
The main page and syllabus will both be updated for the Fall 2014 semester

The previous semester's page, for Fall 2103, is located here.
If you are looking for the previous announcements, they are here.

 

 

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