ENG 251: Film and Literature, Fall 2017
Section C2: Thursday, 2:30
–5:15 pm, E-311
CRN 10916

 

Brian T. Murphy

Bradley Hall, Y-16
516-572-7718

e-mail: brian.murphy@ncc.edu

Schedule and Office Hours
 

Important Announcements and Updates

Saturday, November 11:
Predictably enough, shortly after class was dismissed on Thursday, I found one function disabled three windows down in an audio application and was able to get sound. Sorry about the early dismissal, although it seems several students welcomed it. For next Thursday, finish reading Fahrenheit 451 and, if you can, also watch at least the first hour of the movie. It is available on Amazon, iTunes, and Microsoft Movies & TV; I have not checked Netflix, though.

Remember that the following week, we will meet on Tuesday, November 21, rather than Thursday. We will be starting Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid's Tale; read at least the Introduction and Parts I–V (xiii–xix, 1–75 in our edition) before the 21rst. Also, you should read both Naomi Alderman’s “Dystopian Dreams: How Feminist Science Fiction Predicted the Future” and Rebecca Mead’s “Margaret Atwood: The Prophet of Dystopia”; they are both available online, and I will have handouts next week.

 

 

Tuesday, November 7:
I have posted two additional extra credit opportunities on the main page: Writing Center MLA Research and Documentation Workshops, Nov. 9–Dec. 5,  and The Public Theater's Mobile Unit presents Shakespeare: The Winter's Tale, Tuesday, November 14. In addition, remember that Laura Bates, author of Shakespeare Saved My Life: Ten Years in Solitary with the Bard will be speaking on campus Tuesday, November 14, at 10:00 am and 1:00 pm. As with all extra credit assignments, if you attend one or more of these events and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), you can receive additional points. The Laura Bates presentation and the free Shakespeare are each worth 2 points extra credit; the MLA workshops are worth a single point.

Remember that for Thursday, you should finish reading at least through Part 2 of Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 (pages 67–106 in the edition ordered). We may have a quiz, and then watch part of the film before discussing the text.

Friday, November 3:
Today was the last day of the mis-named "Automatic Withdrawal Period"; as of tomorrow, students must still obtain their instructor’s signature to withdraw a course, but are no longer assured of receiving it. Instructors have the option not to sign the withdraw form, so that students remain on the roster and receive a grade at the end of the semester. If you have stopped attending class, I will still sign withdrawal slips, but only if you bring a completed form to me next week at the start of the class period or during my office hours.

If you have stopped attending class and do not bring a completed form to me by the end of next week, you will receive a grade of UW (Unofficial Withdrawal) at the end of the semester, which carries the same weight as a grade of F. It will adversely affect your GPA, and potentially your financial aid and academic status as well.

Tuesday, October 31:
I have posted topics for Response Paper 8 and 10 on the main page. The topic for 9 will be posted over the next few days.

For Thursday, November 2, be sure to read at least through the Introduction and Part 1 of Ray Bradbury’s  Fahrenheit 451 (xi–xvi and 1–65 in the edition ordered); there will probably be some sort of quiz.

In addition, the Annotated Bibliography is due.

Tuesday, October 24:
I have posted yet another opportunity for extra credit on the main page:

Student Life and the First Year Experience Committee present
Laura Bates, author of
Shakespeare Saved My Life: Ten Years in Solitary with the Bard
Tuesday, November 14
CCB Multi-Purpose Room
10:00 am and 1:00 pm

As with all extra credit assignments, if you attend the lecture and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), you can receive additional points: this event and written response is worth 2 points extra credit. In addition, I have corrected the errors on dates for the Tuesday evening series of Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops.

On Thursday, October 26, we will begin by screening portions of Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange, including at least Alex’s conditioning and parts of the final section. Then we will (I hope) wrap up our discussion of Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange, so be sure to read all the way through Part 3 (145–212 in the edition ordered), including the famous last chapter. If your edition does not include Chapter 21 (Part II, Chapter 7), read it here. Also, read A Clockwork Orange Resucked,” Burgess’ introduction to the 1986 Norton (US) edition,  

Saturday, October 21:
As announced in class, the Annotated Bibliography, originally due on September 28, has been pushed back to Thursday, Nov. 2. The bibliography must include a minimum of five to seven sources, correctly cited according to MLA style, including up to three primary sources (texts and movies) and a minimum of three to five secondary sources (scholarly criticism or analysis or professional critical reviews). In addition to a correct citation for each source, you must include at least one short paragraph for each, a description or summary and an explanation of how you foresee incorporating it into your essay. For additional information on Annotated Bibliographies, see the Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL)’s Annotated Bibliographies, as well as “Sample Annotated Bibilography” and Ebel, Kimberly, “Class and Gender in Cinderella: Annotated Bibliography.”

We will wrap up our discussion of Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange, so be sure to read all the way through Part 3 (145–212 in the edition ordered), including the famous last chapter. If your edition does not include Chapter 21. (Part II, Chapter 7), read it here. Also, read Burgess’ introduction to the 1986 Norton (US) edition, A Clockwork Orange Resucked.” We will also finish viewing excerpts from Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange, including at least Alex’s conditioning and parts of the final section.

Finally, Response Paper 6 and 7 are both due on October 26, if you choose to write on one or both topics. Again, a reminder: responses should be brief, well-developed, coherent, and thoughtful formal essays of at least two to three pages (500-750 words). Be sure to formulate a clear, explicit, assertive (persuasive), objectively-worded thesis statement, to support it with specific, appropriate details, to write grammatically correct, college-level prose, and to avoid use of “I or “you throughout. Essays will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing provided to you as part of your syllabus.

Wednesday, October 18:
I heard extremely interesting things from Professor Smith, who was kind enough to proctor for me. All work you submitted to her will be graded and returned, although as this is my first week back and I have been playing catch-up (and going to far too many meetings), I will not be able to return anything until next week.

For tomorrow, Thursday, Oct, 19, be sure you have read at least through Introduction and Part 2 in Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange. (83–143 in the edition ordered; simply read all of Part 2 in whichever edition you are using!) There may be another quiz, I think, and some productive discussion before viewing at least part of Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange. Also, Response Paper 5 is due.

Finally, note the following changes to the schedule:

Both Response Paper 6 and Response Paper 7 are due next week. Remember, you must complete at least five response papers this semester; responses should be brief, well-developed, coherent, and thoughtful essays of at least two to three pages (500-750 words). You should include independent analysis and demonstrate careful thought, but no research is necessary, nor should any secondary sources be used. This is not a research essay; the only sources utilized or quoted should be the texts themselves. Use of secondary sources, whether credited or not, will be considered grounds for failure. Although these are personal responses, and therefore there is no correct answer, remember that they are still formal essays: in your analyses, formulate a clear, explicit, assertive (persuasive), objectively-worded thesis statement, and avoid use of “I or “you throughout. Do not attempt to address all aspects of the text, but carefully focus your topic, and avoid merely paraphrasing or summarizing the work. Be sure to support your answers with specific references to the work. Essays must be typed, double-spaced, and grammatically correct; essays will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing.

The Annotated Bibliography, formerly due on September 28, has been pushed back to the following week so that we may discuss the assignment in more detail tomorrow.

See you tomorrow!

Tuesday, October 10:
Although I was not in class last Thursday (and will not be in this week, either), Professor Smith was kind enough to proctor for me. All work you submit to her will be graded and returned, and attendance (based on the in-class assignments, quizzes, and/or attendance sheets) will also be counted. For Thursday, Oct, 12, be sure to read at least through Introduction and Part 1 in Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange. (ix–xv, 1–81 in the edition ordered; read all of Part 1 in whichever edition you are using!) If the edition you are using does not have a glossary, see  A Nadsat Glossary and [another] Nadsat Glossary. There will be a quiz, I think, and (I hope) some productive discussion before viewing Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange (1971). Also, remember that Response Paper 4 is due, should that be one you choose to write.

Also, while not all apocalyptic fiction is dystopian (and not all dystopian literature is apocalyptic), this piece from today's New York Times  might interest you: Albeck-Ripka, Livia. “Apocalyptic Fiction, Too Close for Comfort.” New York Times 10 Oct. 2017: D7. (published online as “Is Climate-Themed Fiction All Too Real? We Asked the Experts.” 26 Sep. 2017).

Friday, September 29:
Information about two more possibilities for extra credit has been posted on the main page: 1984 on Broadway at the Hudson Theatre, and A Clockwork Orange at New World Stages. As both are fairly expensive, I do not expect anyone to actually go just for extra credit, but if you decide to go, provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera) to receive your bonus points.

The topic for  Response Paper 3 and outline notes from 14 Sep. and 28 Sep. have also been posted on the main page.

Monday, September 25:
Information about yet another set of extra credit assignments has been posted on the main page: Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops.

Thursday, September 21:
I have read through your responses on last weeks survey, especially your concerns and fears.
Since we are not meeting this week, I have decided to address them here
:

Remember to read at least through Part 2 (1–224) in Orwell’s 1984, along with the handouts from Jill Lepore (“A Golden Age for Dystopian Fiction”) and  Charley Locke (“The Real Reason Dystopian Fiction Is Roaring Back) and that both Response paper 1 and 2 and your research paper topics are due on the 28th.

Monday, September 18:
Due to my unforeseen absence on September 7, I have made several changes to the syllabus as announced in class on Thursday. Please read at least through Part 2 (1–224) in Orwell’s 1984, along with the handouts:

In addition, both Response paper 1 and 2 are due on Thursday, September 28 if you decide to do them; I have provided two choices for each response. Remember, you must complete at least five (5) response papers during the semester, a minimum of 2-3 pages long (500-750 words).

Your research paper topics are also due on the 28th; I will post more detailed instructions and possible selections during the upcoming days.

Finally, the second set of extra credit assignments has been posted on the main page: Academic Success Workshops and Learning Skills Workshops (1 point each) presented by the NCC Center for Educational and Retention Counseling.

See you on Thursday the 28th.

Thursday, September 7:
Due to unforeseen (and unavoidable) circumstances, I will not be on campus today; therefore class will not meet until next week. I have emailed the entire class, and attached a copy of the syllabus as well as providing links to two additional readings. Please familiarize yourself with the syllabus, including all policies and requirements, and be sure to purchase your books and complete the following required readings before we meet next Thursday:

See you next Thursday.

Monday, August 28:
The main page and syllabus have both been updated for the Fall 2017 semester.
Classes begin on Friday, September 1; our first meeting is at 2:30 on Thursday, September 7 in E Building, Room 311.

The class page for Fall 2014, the last time I taught this class, is located here.
If you are looking for the previous announcements, they are here.

 

 

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