ENG 209: Modern Irish Literature, Spring 2018
Section GA:  Monday G Building, Room 359; Wednesday South Hall, 101
                   11:00 am–12:15 pm

James Joyce, Dubliners
J.M. Synge, The Playboy of the Western World...Brian Friel, Dancing at LughnasaWIlliam Trevor, The Oxford Book of Irish Short Stoires

Brian T. Murphy

Bradley Hall, Y-16
516-572-7718

e-mail: brian.murphy@ncc.edu

Schedule and Office Hours
 

Important Announcements and Updates

Tuesday, May 15:
I have finished grading the Final Exam. Your final grades for the semester will be posted at MyNCC (login required) by tomorrow afternoon and are listed below by your ID number. These grades contain generous scaling, including bonus points and adjustments. In addition, extra credit opportunities were announced in class and were also posted here as well as on the main page
; a quick count indicates over thirty points, including at least twelve points based on attending free events on campus. Therefore, please do not email me to ask about extra credit or other things you can do to bring your average up since you were almost passing” or just one point away” from the A and so on; in reality, you were closer to four or five points away.

Enjoy the break.

Student ID Attendance Quizzes/ Writing Essay 1  Essay 2 Midterm Total Final Final  Average Earned Grade
N00101483               NG
N00783785  85 71 A A 99 100 100 A
N00818189  79 70 B+ 0 61 60 60 D
N00826715  80 39 C- 0 58 44 49 F
N00828970  79 33 B+ C 56 60 70 C
N00829855  58 38 F 0 44 64 43 F
N00838266  96 73 C- C- 46 52 70 C
N00841746                 
N00844303 84 48 A A- 89 85 90 A
N00847303  100 43 B+ B- 79 84 87 B+
N00848148  96 85 C+ C 75 76 85 B+
N00848529                W
N00848819  84 82 B+ A 98 91 95 A
N00850434                NA
N00853691  92 65 B+ B 80 92 90 A
N00855681  100 80 A 0 83 96 90 A
N00859154  74 74 0 0 34 20 27 F
N00879265  92 39 A B+ 87 84 90 A

 

 

Friday, May 11:
As we discussed,  on Monday, May 14 we will meet in our usual room (G 359) for Poetry recitations (Extra credit) and the Final Exam. The exam will cover all of the assigned readings since the midterm, from April 4—Wednesday, April 9. It will include an objective portion (choice of matching or identification) and two short written portions.

On Wednesday, May 16, class will not meet; I will be available during normal class hours in my office, Y-16, for Final Conferences, by appointment only.

 

Friday, May 4:
As previously announced, next week we will meet in Bradley Hall on both Monday and Wednesday, in the Haskell Room (second floor) to discuss and watch Brian Friel’s Dancing at Lughnasa. However, in addition I have decided to add one more short story (and film): Colum McCann’s “Everything in This Country Must” and Gary McKendry’s Academy Award-nominated short film adaptation. The story is already available online,  here or here; I will also have printed copies for you on Monday.

Finally, we will have Poetry recitations (Extra credit) and the Final Exam on Monday, May 14, with Final Conferences (by appointment) in Y-16 on Wednesday, May 16.

Monday, April 30:
As per our discussion this morning, I have modified our schedule for the remaining two weeks. We will continue with Heaney’s poetry on Wednesday; be sure to focus carefully on at least “Digging” and the Bog poems: “Bogland” and “The Tollund Man,” in particular. Next week we will meet in Bradley Hall on both Monday and Wednesday, in the Haskell Room (second floor) to discuss and (I hope) watch Brian Friel’s Dancing at Lughnasa. Finally, we will have Poetry recitations (Extra credit)
and the Final Exam on Monday, May 14, with Final Conferences (by appointment) in Y-16 on Wednesday, May 16.

Tuesday, April 17:
As we agreed on Monday, students will have the  option to rewrite and resubmit any or all of the passage identifications from the bluebook portion of the midterm, to be submitted in class next Monday, April 23. Rewrites must be typed and submitted with the original bluebook attached, but this time you do not have to submit a typed explanation of the changes made. Note that since you are working at home, there is no reason to misidentify any of the passages; however, use of secondary sources, whether documented or not, will result in a grade of zero.

In addition, Essay 2 will not be due tomorrow, April 18, as originally scheduled. That, too, will be due in class on Monday, April 23.

Be sure to read the packet of selected poems by Thomas Kinsella for tomorrow. If you were not in class yesterday and did not receive the packet, all of the poems are available online, here.

Friday, April 13:
Happy birthday, Seamus Heaney!

Although we barely had a quorum on Wednesday, the class voted to continue our discussion of short fiction on Monday, and to push back our discussion of Thomas Kinsella until Wednesday. Therefore, as we discussed “Death in Jerusalem,” be ready to discuss Brian Friel’s “The Diviner,” Edna O’Brien’s Irish Revel,” and/or  John McGahern’sThe Beginning of an Idea.” Also, be prepared for a quiz or some sort of short writing assignment, to make up for whatever happened on Wednesday!

We will also discuss what to do about that quiz on Wednesday, and about the bluebook portion of the midterm.

Tuesday, April 10:
I have posted yet another extra credit opportunity on the main page:

Be sure to refer to the revised schedule of readings and to follow the instructions for topic proposals and revisions of midterm short essays, posted previously. (See below)

Sunday, April 8:
Because of an unexpected family situation, I will be unable to hold class on Monday. This means we are going to adjust the schedule (again), and that students get a reprieve.

First, the corrected schedule of readings is below. For Wednesday, read William Trevor’s “Death in Jerusalem,” Brian Friel’s “The Diviner,” Edna O’Brien’s Irish Revel,” and  John McGahern’sThe Beginning of an Idea” (all in Trevor’s Oxford Book of Irish Short Stories).

In addition, both topic proposals for Essay 2 and revisions of midterm short essays are due on Wednesday, April 11 instead of tomorrow. As explained in class, on the main page, and in the handout, you must get prior approval if you wish to write on a topic of your own for Essay 2. Proposals are not required if you choose one of the assigned topics. Revisions of midterm essays must be submitted according to the rules explained in class, sent via email to all students, and posted below. Failure to submit in full according to these directions will result in the essay being returned, unread.

Mon., 9 Apr.

 No class

Wed., 11 Apr.

 Essay 2 Topic Proposals due

 Midterm Revisions Due

 William Trevor (1928- ), “Death in Jerusalem” (Trevor 455-470);
 Brian Friel (1929-2015), “The Diviner” (Trevor 471-481);
 Edna O’Brien (1932-), Irish Revel” (Trevor 495-514);
 
John McGahern (1934-2006), “The Beginning of an Idea” (Note: in online text, the story begins halfway down page 30) (Trevor 526-540)

 *See also, 
   Anton Chekhov, “Oysters
    *Also, see also,  Pavel Chekov

 *Recommended viewing:
   “The Diviner” as read by Donal Donnelly, here

 
Irish Writers in America: Edna O’Brien;
  John McGahernRoscommon Landscape, Knockivar, and John McGahern: A Rural Writer?
   (from Reading Ireland: Contemporary Irish Writers in the Context of Place)

Mon., 16 Apr.

 Thomas Kinsella (1928- ): selected poems (handout)?

 *See also, 
  “Aogán Ó Rathaille.”  Wikipedia.org.
  Yeats, W. B.  “The Curse of Cromwell.” PoemHunter.com

Tuesday, April 3:
I have finished correcting the matching section for the Objective portion of the Midterm Exam; you will get them back tomorrow. It will take me a while to read through and grade all of the paragraphs, however. I was slightly surprised that nobody identified all passages correctly, although one student was correct on 23 out of 25, and another two students identified 22 out of 25 correctly. Also, there was not a single passage that every student got incorrect. We will talk about this tomorrow.

Students who have signed up for poetry recitations will also have their opportunity to try for extra credit, and we will discuss Essay 2 and topic proposals.

Revisions of midterm short essays are due on Monday, April 9, according to the same standards announced previously, for Essay 1:

Your revisions, regardless of which of the three categories above you fall into, must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay, and must be submitted with the original marked essay attached as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, in the following  pattern:

Paragraph 1: Changes in content. What was added, deleted, or modified?

Paragraph 2: Changes in organization. What sentences, ideas, or paragraphs were moved, how things were rearranged, and why?

Paragraph 3: Cosmetic level changes. What specific editing for grammar was performed, or what corrections made in punctuation, mechanics, and diction?

Evidence of substantial revision may result in a better grade for the assignment. Failure to (re)submit in full according to these directions will result in the essay being returned, unread.

Finally, as announced in class and as per the revised schedule, be sure to read Frank O’Connor’s “The Majesty of the Law” and “Guests of the Nation”; Mary Lavin’s Sarah” (Trevor 392-400); and William Trevor’s “Death in Jerusalem” (Trevor 455-470). We will certainly not discuss all of them, but we may discuss (and have a quiz on) any of them.

Saturday, March 31:
On Monday, April 2, the class will take the long-delayed
Midterm Exam. Students who have signed up for poetry recitations will have their opportunity first, and then students will complete the in-class Objective portion of the exam.*

I will also return the midterm short essays submitted; grades ranged from A to RW (Rewrite). If you did not submit the essays via email, despite my emails and posts, you have a grade of zero for that portion of the exam. Students may revise and resubmit the short essays on Monday, April 9, according to the same standards announced previously, for Essay 1:

Your revisions, regardless of which of the three categories above you fall into, must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay, and must be submitted with the original marked essay attached as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, in the following  pattern:

Paragraph 1: Changes in content. What was added, deleted, or modified?

Paragraph 2: Changes in organization. What sentences, ideas, or paragraphs were moved, how things were rearranged, and why?

Paragraph 3: Cosmetic level changes. What specific editing for grammar was performed, or what corrections made in punctuation, mechanics, and diction?

Evidence of substantial revision may result in a better grade for the assignment. Failure to (re)submit in full according to these directions will result in the essay being returned, unread.

*If you are reading this, you should be advised: the answer to number one, the first identification passage, is F, “The Boarding House” by James Joyce.

Monday, March 26:
Despite the email I sent to the class, I have received short essays from only ten students as of this morning.

Wednesday, March 21:
As per the email I sent to the class, you should email me the short essay portion of the midterm exam. Alternatively, if the college is not closed tomorrow, you may drop off a printed copy in Bradley Hall before 2:00, either in my office (Y 16) or in my box in the mailroom.

When we return from break, on Monday, April 2, we will start with Poetry recitations and then complete the in-class Objective portion of the exam.

The main page has been updated to reflect these changes.

Monday, March 19:
As it is looking more likely that class will not meet on Wednesday, March 21, we will probably have to reconsider the Midterm Exam. In the event that we do not meet, I am inclined to require students to email me the short essay portion on Wednesday before or during the normal class period, and  to complete the in-class Objective portion when we return from break, on Monday, April 2.

I will email the entire class once the college has made its decision.

Wednesday, March 14:
As per our discussion today, we will finish The Playboy of the Western World; on Monday, March 19, and the Midterm Exam will be pushed off until Wednesday, March 21. Remember that you have one full week to complete the Short essays portion; this must by typed, and submitted before you will be allowed to complete the in-class Objective portion. For the in-class portion, you could reread everything since the beginning of the semester; however, I suggest you focus only on important passages from the following works:

Short stories:

James Joyce, “The Sisters”

---. “An Encounter”

---. “Araby”

---. “Eveline”

---. “Two Gallants”

---. “The Boarding House”

---. “The Dead”

Elizabeth Bowen, “Her Table Spread”

Seán Ó Faoláin, “The Faithless Wife”

---. “The Sugawn Chair”

 Play:

J. M. Synge, Playboy of the Western World

 

Poems:

William Butler Yeats, “The Stolen Child”

---. “The Lake Isle of Innisfree”

---. “When You Are Old”

---. “No Second Troy”

---. “The Wild Swans at Coole”

---. “Easter, 1916”

---. “The Second Coming”

 ---. “Leda and the Swan”

Richard Murphy, “Rapparees”

---. “Wolfhound”

---. “Orange March”

---. “Casement’s Funeral

Tuesday, March 13:
For Wednesday, March 14, finish reading The Playboy of the Western World; we will finish discussing some of the major themes and issues the play presents, and possibly watch part of The Playboy of the Western World presented by the Druid Theatre Company of Galway.

Also, as per our discussion of the Midterm Exam, I will present you with the topic choices for your short, written responses; those will be due on Monday, March 19, when we will start with Poetry recitations and then complete the objective portion of the exam.

On Wednesday, March 21, we will look at stories by Frank O’Connor (“The Majesty of the Law” and “Guests of the Nation”) and Mary Lavin (“Sarah”), all in The Oxford Book of Irish Short Stories.

Finally, I have posted yet another extra credit opportunity on the main page; this one is a bit steep, unfortunately:

Three Small Masterpieces at the Irish Repertory Theatre,
March 2–April 22:
The Pot of Broth by William Butler Yeats, in collaboration with Lady Gregory; The Rising of the Moon by Lady Gregory; and Riders to the Sea by John Millington Synge.

Wednesday, March 7:
Because the college decided against holding classes today; we need to adjust our schedule. We will discuss The Playboy of the Western World by J. M. Synge next week;  for Monday, March 12; be sure to read at least through Act II, and for Wednesday, March 14, finish Act III.

You may find the following recommended videos useful in understanding and appreciating Playboy:

The Playboy of the Western World (Druid Theatre Company of Galway)
The Playboy of the Western World (The Great Courses)

On Monday we will also discuss the Midterm Exam, and you can sign up for Poetry recitations.
(Unless, of course, we get another nor’easter and the college is closed again....)

Monday, March 5:
As per my email and the announcement in class today, I will not be updating this page as often as I have done in the past, so do not check here to see if we have classes Wednesday morning. If the predictions for the storm continue to get worse, the college is likely to make a decision Tuesday night; you should receive a text and an email if you have signed up for NCC alerts.

Assuming we do have class, we will discuss The Playboy of the Western World by J. M. Synge; be sure to read at least through Act I.

Monday, February 26:
Thank you for understanding my unplanned absence today, and for welcoming Dr. O’Connor in my stead. I asked her to remind you that revisions of Essay 1 are due on Wednesday, and to read the selected poems of Richard Murphy (in the same handout as MacNeice).

In addition, I have just posted yet another extra credit opportunity on the main page; this one is free, although it is in Manhattan on Thursday night:

Mick Moloney: “If It Wasn’t for the Irish and the Jews:
Exploring Irish and Jewish Historical Musical Links and Influences on Musical Theatre, Vaudeville, Tin Pan Alley America”
Taking its title and inspiration from a catchy song composed in 1912 by William Jerome (real name: William Flannery) and Jean Schwartz, “If It Wasn’t for the Irish and the Jews” is an engrossing, entertaining, and insightful examination of this cross-pollination in a bygone era of U.S. cultural history. Former Broadway luminaries such as George M. Cohan (Irish ancestral surname: Keohane), Eddie Foy (real name: Edwin Fitzgerald), Norah Bayes (born Norah Goldberg), Tony Hart, Ed Harrigan, and Ada Jones populate Dr. Moloney’s richly illustrated talk on the nimble wit, socioeconomic observation, exuberant rhythms, melodic charm, and sentimental appeal pulsing through this under-appreciated chapter of American musical history. With a rich trove of visual illustrations and archival film footage, Moloney extends the musical discussion to the social backdrop of Irish-Jewish relationships in American film, theater, Tammany politics and organized crime in the prohibition era.

Glucksman Ireland House
 New York University
1 Washington Mews,
New York, NY 10003

Thursday, March 1
7:00–9:00 pm
Free, but advance registration required.

See you all on Wednesday.

Sunday, February 25:
Due to an unanticipated administrative meeting at 10:30 on Monday, February 26, I will not be in class at 11:00; however, my colleague Dr. O’Connor has agreed to cover for me and is prepared to discuss Louis MacNeice, as per the revised schedule. I have told her that you are an engaged, enthusiastic group. I hope to be able to join you all for the final fifteen or twenty minutes of class, but the last  “one-hour” meeting of this group ran almost three hours.

In addition, as announced in class before break, revisions of Essay 1 are due on Wednesday, February 28. See instructions, below.

Friday, February 16:
We will discuss Louis MacNeice after break, on Monday, February 26. That will be followed by Richard Murphy, either Wednesday or the following week. All of the links for MacNeice have been verified and updated as necessary; those for Richard Murphy will be checked after the break.

In addition, as announced in class on Wednesday, revisions of Essay 1 are due next week, on Wednesday, February 28. Note the following, as announced in class today:

  • If you did not receive a passing grade (C range or better), you received the mark RW for Rewrite. You must revise your essay; visiting the Writing Center and working with a tutor is strongly recommended. Be sure to bring a copy of the assignment with you.

  • If you did receive a grade of C or higher and still wish to revise, it is advisable to see me during Office Hours to discuss the essay or, if my hours do not work, to visit a tutor in the Writing Center instead before you revise the essay. If you do work with a tutor, be sure to bring a copy of the assignment with you.

  • Finally, if you did not submit the essay on time, you have a grade of zero and may not submit a “revision.” However, if you bring a completed, typed essay to the Writing Center, review it with a tutor, and then revise it, you may submit the essay.

Your revisions, regardless of which of the three categories above you fall into, must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay (revisions should be based upon the Revising and Editing Checklist and relevant information from class and the textbooks), and must be submitted with the original marked essay attached as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, in the following  pattern:

Paragraph 1: Changes in content. What was added, deleted, or modified?

Paragraph 2: Changes in organization. What sentences, ideas, or paragraphs were moved, how things were rearranged, and why?

Paragraph 3: Cosmetic level changes. What specific editing for grammar was performed, or what corrections made in punctuation, mechanics, and diction?

Evidence of substantial revision may result in a better grade for the assignment. 

Enjoy the week off.

Monday, February 12:
A
s discussed in class today, I have exercised my prerogative and changed the schedule. On Wednesday, February 14, we will continue discussing Yeats, then discuss your 
Essay 1 submissions and (optional) revisions. We will discuss Louis MacNeice after break, on Monday, February 26. All of the links for MacNeice have been verified and updated as necessary.

Wednesday, February 7:
I have posted information about two additional
extra credit opportunities on the main page:

Joshua Lafazan is speaking on February 13 in CCB Multi-Purpose Room, and
the
If students attend and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), they can receive one additional point per event or workshop.

For those interested, I have also posted links to several things that arose in discussion today: Walden by Henry David Thoreau (here, or available used starting at $2.31 at Amazon.com); see also The Walden Woods Project: The Thoreau Institute at Walden Woods; and  Joni Mitchell, “Big Yellow Taxi” (live version); studio version here. I also went back to The Autobiography, where I found this: “My father had read to me some passage out of Walden, and I planned to live some day in a a cottage on a little island called Innisfree” (47) and this:

I had still the ambition, formed in Sligo in my teens, of living in imitation of Thoreau on Innisfree, a little island in Lough Gill, and when walking through Fleet Street very homesick I heard a little tinkle of water and saw a fountain in a shop-window which balanced a little ball upon its jet, and began to remember lake water. From the sudden remembrance came my poem Innisfree, my first lyric with anything in its rhythm of my own music. I had begun to loosen rhythm as an escape from rhetoric and from that emotion of the crowd that rhetoric brings, but I only understood vaguely and occasionally that I must for my special purpose use nothing but the common syntax. A couple of years later I could not have written that first line with its conventional archaism -- Arise and go"—nor the inversion of the last stanza. (103).

For Monday, be sure to finish reading the W. B. Yeats packet of selected poems that I distributed in class. We will likely begin with a short in-class writing assignment, and use that to start our discussion.

Just a reminder that Essay 1 was due in class today. Please refer to your syllabus for policies on late work

Tuesday, February 6:
As I feared, The Dead  was removed from the library collection sometime between last week and Monday morning. As I indicated, we are bound by Nassau County regulations for materials that have been de-accessioned; the VHS tape is now undoubtedly on its way to some secure storage facility.

For tomorrow, be sure to read at least “The Stolen Child,” “When You Are Old,” and “The Lake Isle of Innisfree” from the W. B. Yeats packet I distributed yesterday.

Just one more reminder that Essay 1 is due tomorrow, February 7. All of the information and instructions about the assignment are on your syllabus and on the main page. Therefore, I will not be answering any last-minute questions about the essay at 11:30pm tonight.

Sunday, February 4:
According to the schedule, for tomorrow you should read
Elizabeth Bowen’s  Her Table Spread” and Seán Ó Faoláin’s “The Faithless Wife” and “The Sugawn Chair”; all of these are in The Oxford Book of Irish Short Stories, which you should certainly have had enough time to acquire by now. (As of today, it is available used starting at $2.47 at Amazon.com.) However, I am considering watching   The Dead (1987)  instead adjusting the reading schedule. We may vote on it in class or I may make a unilateral decision, assuming of course that the library copy is actually available and that the VCR-DVD player in our classroom actually works.

Also, remember that Essay 1 is due on February 7. Essays must be at least five to seven pages (1250 words minimum), with a cover page and Works Cited page, and must  use a minimum of five to seven sources: up to three primary sources and a minimum of three to five secondary sources. Be sure to review all of the information and instructions about the assignment on your syllabus and on the main page. and be prepared with any questions tomorrow; I do not plan on answering last-minute questions about the essay at 11:30pm Tuesday!

Finally, please note that the links for selected poems by W. B. Yeats have all been updated and verified. I do have a handout for the class, which I forgot to bring and distribute last week, but all of the poems on it are available online.

Tuesday, January 30:
As announced in class on Monday, Essay 1 is due on February 7. Essays must be at least five to seven pages (1250 words minimum), with a cover page and Works Cited page, and must  use a minimum of five to seven sources: up to three primary sources and a minimum of three to five secondary sources. If you would like to write on a topic other than those provided (Religion and the Priesthood, Family and Family Obligations, Coming of Age/Loss of Innocence, or Ireland and “Irishness”) you must get approval by tomorrow.

For tomorrow, be sure to read A Painful Case” (107-118), Ivy Day in the Committee Room” (119-138), and “The Dead” (183-236), although we will probably focus on The Dead.”

Also, I have begun adding links to videos to the main page; these are recommended viewings, not required, and are all available free through the NCC Library (login required).

Saturday, January 20:
As anticipated, we will not have class in the Haskell Room on Mondays; we have been moved to G Building, Room 359 because there is an elevator. Also, I understand it is a much nicer and more comfortable room than the ones to which we were previously assigned. Please continue to check Banner and this page for updates, as it is possible we will be moved to the same room for Wednesday classes as well, for consistency.

For Monday, be sure to read The Proclamation of the Irish Republic, 1916” and  James Joyce, Dubliners: The Sisters” (1-11). We may even have a quiz.

Also, the Writing Center is now open and has posted hours for Spring 2018.

Wednesday, January 17:
As announced in class this morning, I am changing the schedule already. For Monday, be sure to read “The Proclamation of the Irish Republic, 1916” and  James Joyce, Dubliners: “The Sisters” (1-11).

Also, as of this afternoon, we may not have class in the Haskell Room on Mondays; we may be moved to yet another room, one that does not involve stairs. Be sure to check Banner and this page for updates.

Tuesday, January 16:
As of this afternoon, we will not have class in Y-A/B on Wednesdays. Rather than meeting in the computer lab in Bradley Hall as originally scheduled, we will meet in South Hall, Room 101 on Wednesdays. Also, please note: although your schedule indicates that we meet in Y-13 in Bradley Hall, that is the English Department office. We are actually meeting in the Haskell Room on Mondays, on the second floor of Bradley Hall (beside the computer lab, Y-216).

Friday, January 12:
The main page and syllabus have been updated for the Spring 2018 semester.

Textbooks have been ordered through the NCC Bookstore; however, you are encouraged to purchase them from wherever they are least expensive.
We will be using the following:

Friel, Brian. Dancing at Lughnasa: A Play. London and Boston: Faber and Faber, 1998. ISBN 9780571144792.
(Available used startng at $0.01 at Amazon.com*).

Joyce, James. Dubliners. New York: Signet, 2007. ISBN 9780451530417.
(Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com*).

Synge, J. M. The Playboy of the Western World and Riders to the Sea. New York: Dover, 1993. ISBN 9780486275628.
(Available used starting at $0.01 at Amazon.com*).

Trevor, William, ed. The Oxford Book of Irish Short Stories. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010. ISBN 9780199583140.
(Available used starting at $1.11 at Amazon.com*).


*Prices listed at Amazon.com do not include shipping, and are accurate as of original posting date only; no guarantees of prices or availability are express or implied§.

In addition, I have already posted seven opportunities for extra credit.

The page for the last time this course was offered, Spring 2016, is located here.
If you are looking for announcements from that semester, they are here.

 

 

 

 

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