ENG 101: Composition I
Section GA: Monday/Wednesday, 11:00 am–12:15 pm
                      
South 109/South 110 
The Norton Field Guide to Writing, 4 ed.

Brian T. Murphy

Bradley Hall, Y-16 (Placement Office)
516-572-7185, ext. 25686

e-mail: brian.murphy@ncc.edu

Schedule and Office Hours
 

Important Announcements and Updates

Wednesday, March 22:
Since I was unable to be in class today, Professor O'Connor was kind enough to cover for me and proctor an  in-class writing assignment: analyze Andrew Leonard’s “Black Friday: Consumerism Minus Civilization” in terms of the seven key features of argument essays on pages 169-170, from “A clear and arguable position” though “Careful consideration of other positions,” and explain how well it meets these requirements, one short, thoughtful paragraph for each feature. You should have been able to complete this within the allotted time, as it was intended to take just about an hour or so.

I have also posted information about the Writing Center's MLA Research and Documentation Workshops on the main page under Extra Credit; attending one of the workshops and submitting a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera) can earn you one additional point on your final average or will be used to offset one absence if you are in jeopardy due to excessive absences.

In addition, you should have picked up all old work, including Essay 3: Comparison/Contrast (In-class Essay). Instructions for this essay were quite specific:

Compose a persuasive contrast essay.

Your essay should have a title, ideally one more creative or original than “A vs. B.”

You must assert something about the subjects, that one of the two is in some way significantly different than the other, and use appropriate topic sentences. Your thesis statements must indicate the specific significant difference between the two. Be sure not to state merely that one “is better than” or “superior to” the other; rather, define a specific, significant difference, one that all of your details support. So, for example, A is funnier than B because...” or “A is both simpler and more economical than B because...For example:

Thesis:  An assertion concerning the two subjects chosen for your essay, indicating the specific significant difference between the two and the major divisions of your essay.

For example:  Although A and B are (similar in some way or ways), A (is superior in some way to) B because of (major criteria: the divisions of your essay).

Topic sentence 1:  An assertion about how one single criterion, your first major division, distinguishes the two subjects.

For example:  The first way in which A (is superior in some way to) B is (first major criterion).

    Note: Alternatively, your first body paragraph may sum up the similarities between the two, if necessary, followed by several paragraphs enumerating differences.

Topic sentence 2:  An assertion about how one single criterion, your second major division, distinguishes the two subjects.

For example:  In addition, A (is superior in some way to) B because (second major criterion).

Topic sentence 3:  An assertion about how one single criterion, your third major division, distinguishes the two subjects.

For example:  More importantly, A is also (superior in third major criterion to) B:

The topics, while allowing great freedom of choice, were also quite specific:

1.)  Two similar television shows; for example, two specific situation comedies, two news broadcasts, two police procedurals, and so on. You may not use The Simpsons or Family Guy, or television programs about superheroes, nor should you focus on just a single character or figure from each show.

2.)  The print and movie versions of the same story. (The print version of the story can be a novel, graphic novel, short story, play, and so on). How does the movie adapt, revise, or alter the story, what is changed or left out, and why? How do all of these individual changes contribute to a different interpretation of the text; that is, what is the significant difference between the versions?

3.)  Two different versions of the same film, but be careful not to confuse reboots with remakes. That is, something like Rise of the Planet of the Apes (2011) is not another version of Planet of the Apes (1968, 2001), nor is Batman Begins (2005) or The Dark Knight Rises (2012) the same story as Batman (1989). As above, how does each version adapt, revise, or alter the story? What is changed or left out, and why?

4.)   Two ads for similar products that were published (or broadcast) between 25–75 years apart. (Some research required.) Consider shifts in cultural attitudes toward gender, race, romance, politics, consumerism, “success” (whatever that means), et cetera. Your assertion should refer to the significant changes or shifts in appeal, effectiveness, audience, and so on.

However, a large number of students either followed the standard model, as I explained in class not to do, or did not follow the instructions and models in composing their thesis statements and topic sentences, or did not write on acceptable topics. Consequently, many students did not receive a grade on their essays, and must revise; those students who did follow instructions may also submit revisions if they wish to improve their grade. Essay 3 revisions are due on Wednesday, March 29. As with all revisions, and as has been the policy since the first day of the semester, you must also submit the original essay, the prewriting, and a one-page explanation of your changes. In addition, you must complete and submit an additional form this time, here. Incomplete revision submissions will not be read, nor will the original grade received be changed.

I have made changes to the schedule; make note of the readings and assignments for the next few classes:
 

Mon.,
 20 Mar

 Using Words Effectively: “Audience,” “Genre” (Bullock 57-63);
 “Words” (Norton W), especially “Appropriate Words” (W-1), “Precise Words” (W-2), and “Unnecessary Words” (W-4)

 *See also,  Orwell,  “Politics and the English Language” (and  Orwell in America under Extra Credit, above.)
                     Schuman, Rebecca. “Cease Rogeting Proximately!Slate.com  14 Aug. 2014. Web.
                     Shea, Ammon. “Vocabulary Size.” New York Times Magazine 14 March 2010: 14. New York Times. Web.

 Process Revisions Due (optional)
 See additional required form, here.

 Online Exercises due:

Commas: Review
Semicolon: Review
End Punctuation: Review
Quotation Marks: Review
Question Marks: Punctuation
Apostrophes: Review
Capitalization: Review
Italics: Review

 Additional, optional exercises:

*Commas: Independent Clauses, Commas: Introductory Words, Commas: Series, Commas: Nonrestrictive Clauses, Commas: Parenthetical, Commas: Quotations etc, Commas: Addresses & Dates

*Semicolon: Independent Clauses, Semicolons: Series

*Quotation Marks: Quotations, Quotation Marks: Titles, Double and Single Quotation Marks

*Apostrophes: Possessives, Apostrophes: Contractions, Apostrophes: Possessives & Plurals

*Capitals: Proper Nouns, , Capitals: Titles & Sentences

*Italics: Titles, Italics: Non-English Words

*Colons, Dashes, Parentheses, and Brackets

*Hyphens: Compounds, Hyphens: Word Breaks

*Abbreviations: Review

*Numbers

Wed.,
 22 Mar

 Leonard, “Black Friday: Consumerism Minus Civilization” (Bullock 164-168)

 In-Class Writing Assignment

Mon.,
 27 Mar

 Persuasion/Argument Writing:
 “Arguing a Position” (Bullock 156-182); “Arguing” (Bullock 355-375)
 “Punctuation” and “Mechanics” (Norton P-1 through P-11)

Wed.,
 29 Mar

MacKay, “Organ Sales Save Lives” (Bullock 156-161)
 
Note: For online text, scroll down

 Midterm Essay Revisions Due
 See additional required form, here.

 In-Class exercise: TBA

 

Friday, March 17:
For Monday, March 20, be sure to read “Arguing a Position” (Bullock 156-182); “Arguing” (Bullock 355-375), and in the Norton Online Handbook, “Punctuation” and “Mechanics” (P-1 through P-11). In addition, revisions of the Process Essay are due. As previously announced, the topic choices were as follows:

1.)  How to perform a specific process associated with an unusual hobby or interest: for example, how to groom a horse, evaluate the worth of a baseball card, stretch and prep a canvas, et cetera. Do not attempt to explain an entire hobby, however; focus on just one process. Additionally, this should be an unusual hobby, not something like playing videogames or soccer. 

2.)  How to cope with a specific, unusual emergency situation: not how to administer CPR or how to administer first aid to someone badly cut, but what to do if  pursued by an alligator or if your car goes off the Whitestone or George Washington Bridge, for example.

3.)  How to master one specific important academic survival skill: taking notes, finding materials in the college library, registering for classes, and so on, but not how to study, write an essay, or read critically. Be sure to include your own, specific ideas, and be sure that your process analysis is written in such a way that it is genuinely useful to a new student.

If you did not write on an approved topic, you must submit a new essay on one of the above, and include your original off-topic essay. As always, to submit a revision, you must include the original graded essay and/or draft(s) along with your revision, as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, including one paragraph each on content, organization, and cosmetics Additionally, this time you must also complete and include this form, indicating your thesis and topic sentences and following the model. Revisions submitted without all of the required elements will not be read.

On Wednesday, March 22, we may have class in the lab again; I will let you know Monday.

Tuesday, March 14:
On Wednesday, March 15, the college may remain closed, or we may have a delayed opening, in which case morning classes may not be held, or we might have a normal school day. Unfortunately, I will probably not know until late this afternoon at the earliest, and possibly not before tomorrow morning. Due to this current uncertainty, I am leaving the schedule flexible for now. In case we do have class, we will meet in Y-A/B, the computer lab in the Writing Center, Bradley Hall, to write the Midterm Exam. If we do not meet, I will make try to make arrangements to use the lab next week and revise the schedule accordingly.

Update: Due to inclement weather, all classes, including online classes, services and activities at Nassau Community College that begin prior to 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday, March 15 are canceled. All classes and activities will resume at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, March 15. This means our class will meet; I will see you at 11:00 in Y-A/B.

Saturday, March 11:
For Monday, March 13, be sure to read the handout, Britt, “Neat People vs. Sloppy People” (Handout);  there will be a quiz or writing assignment.

Also, read “Audience,” “Genre” (Bullock 57-63), and “Words” (Norton W), especially “Appropriate Words” (W-1), “Precise Words” (W-2), and “Unnecessary Words” (W-4). There may be an in-class assignment, as well as homework., or I may decide to shift the entire lesson until after the midterm exam.

Finally, we will also discuss “Taking Essay Exams” (Bullock 428-432); as announced in class last week, we will meet in the Writing Center computer lab in Bradley Hall on Wednesday, March 15. You should be thinking about movies, television, books, and advertising this weekend, and

Tuesday, March 7:
Be sure to read Fallows, “Throwing Like a Girl” (Bullock 137-141) for tomorrow.
In addition, Essay 2 is due tomorrow, as announced in class. As per the syllabus, essays must be at least three to four (3-4) pages (750 to 1000 words, minimum) and correctly formatted.

Sunday, February 26:
I hope you have had a restful and productive break. Remember that revisions of Essay 1 are due in class on Monday, February 27, as announced in class, and must be submitted with the original graded essay and/or draft(s) attached as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made. If you did not submit a completed essay on time, you may submit a “revision” only if you have brought a completed, typed essay to the Writing Center, reviewed it with a tutor, and revised it; you must submit the tutor-reviewed essay, your revision, and the one-page explanation as above to receive credit.

In addition, read  Roberts, “How to Say Nothing in 500 Words” (Handout) and  “Adjectives and Adverbs” (Norton W-5) by Monday, and complete and submit the online exercises: Adjectives and Adverbs 1, Adjectives and Adverbs 2, Modifier Placement. For each, remember to select ten questions, not five, and review carefully if you get a question wrong. If you score 8, 9, or 10 out of 10 (80% or better), submit your scores; otherwise, reread the material and try again. Be sure to include your full name, section (GA, not BB as previously posted in error) and my correct email: Brian.Murphy@NCC.edu.

See you tomorrow.

Friday, February 17:
Essay 1 was returned in class on Wednesday, February 15; if you wish to revise your essay, revisions are due the day after break, on Monday, February 27, not on March 6 as originally planned. Revisions must be substantially revised, not merely “corrected” versions of the original essay (revisions should be based upon the Revising and Editing Checklist and relevant information from class and the textbooks), and must be submitted with the original graded essay and/or draft(s) attached as well as one full typed page detailing the changes made, in the following  pattern:

  • Paragraph 1: Changes in content. What was added, deleted, or modified.

  • Paragraph 2: Changes in organization. What sentences, ideas, or paragraphs were moved, how things were rearranged, and why.

  • Paragraph 3: Cosmetic level changes. What specific editing for grammar was performed, or what corrections made in punctuation, mechanics, and diction.

Evidence of substantial revision may result in a better grade for the assignment. If you did not submit a completed essay on time, according to the syllabus, you will receive a grade of zero and may not submit a “revision.” However, this one time, I will allow you to bring a completed, typed essay to the Writing Center, review it with a tutor, revise it, and submit that for at least partial credit.

In addition, read  Roberts, “How to Say Nothing in 500 Words” (Handout) and  “Adjectives and Adverbs” (Norton W-5) by Monday, and complete the following online exercises: Adjectives and Adverbs 1, Adjectives and Adverbs 2, Modifier Placement. For each, remember to select ten questions, not five, and review carefully if you get a question wrong. If you score 8, 9, or 10 out of 10 (80% or better), submit your scores; otherwise, reread the material and try again. Be sure to include your full name, section (GA, not BB as previously posted in error) and my correct email: Brian.Murphy@NCC.edu.

Enjoy the break.

Thursday, February 9:
Essay 1 is due in class on Monday, February 13; topic choices and instructions are here. As per the syllabus, essays must be typed (in 12-point Times New Roman), double-spaced, with one-inch margins, and stapled when submitted. All essays must also include a proper heading, including Word Count; have an appropriate, original title; and contain a clear, explicit, assertive, objectively worded thesis statement. (Thesis statements must be underlined). Finally, all work should be grammatically correct, free of errors in mechanics, grammar, usage, spelling, and documentation, and will be evaluated according to the Model for Evaluation of Student Writing.

In addition to the assigned readings for Monday (“Explaining a Process” in Bullock, 414-418, and Goodheart, “How to Mummify a Pharoah”), do not forget to complete the online readings and Online Exercises:

In The Norton Online Handbook read “Subject-Verb Agreement” and “Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement” (Norton S-5 and S-6a).
(
Use the icon at the bottom left to display the Table of Contents.)

After you have completed the reading, click on and complete each of the following multiple-choice exercises:

S-V Agreement Review,
S-V Separated,
Compound Subjects,
Subject after Verb,
Collective Nouns,
Indefinite Pronouns,
Who, That, Which,
Pronoun Review,
Pronoun Agreement

For each, be sure to select ten questions, not five, and review carefully if you get a question wrong. If you score 8, 9, or 10 out of 10 (80% or better), submit your scores; otherwise, reread the material and try again. Be sure to include your full name, section (GA) and my correct email: Brian.Murphy@NCC.edu.

Finally, I have posted the following additional Extra Credit opportunities on the main page:

Writing Center Grammar Review Workshops (1 point each)
Sentence Building and Avoiding Run-ons, Comma Splices, and Fragments
Using Correct Punctuation: Commas, Semicolons, and Colons
Subject-Verb Agreement, Verb Formation, Tense Usage

Tuesday/Thursday Club Hour Series: 11:30 am to 12:45 pm

Thursday, March 2

Library L 233-A

Building Compound Sentences

Tuesday, March 7

Library L 233-A

Building Complex Sentences

Tuesday, March 7

Bradley Hall Ballroom

Building Compound Sentences

Tuesday, March 14

Bradley Hall Ballroom

Building Complex Sentences

Tuesday, March 21

Library L 233-A

Understanding and Using Verb Tense

Thursday, March 23

Bradley Hall Ballroom

Subject-Verb Agreement

Tuesday, March 28

Library L 233-A

Using Correct Punctuation

Tuesday, March 30

Bradley Hall Ballroom

The Verb Phrase

Wednesday Afternoon Series: 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm, Bradley Hall Ballroom

Wednesday, March 1

Bradley Hall Ballroom

Building Compound Sentences

Wednesday, March 8

Bradley Hall Ballroom

Building Complex Sentences

Wednesday, March 15

Bradley Hall Ballroom

Subject-Verb Agreement

Wednesday, March 22

Bradley Hall Ballroom

The Verb Phrase

Tuesday Evening Series

Tuesday, Feb.14
 5:30-6:50 pm

G 233

Building Compound Sentences

Tuesday, Feb. 28
 5:30-6:50 pm

Library L 233-A

Building Complex Sentences

Tuesday, March 21
 7:00-8:20 pm

G (Room TBD)

Using Correct Punctuation

Tuesday, March 28
 7:00-8:20 pm

Library L 233-A

Using Correct Punctuation

The Writing Centers are located in Bradley Hall (Bldg. Y) and on the second floor of the Library, room L233
572-7195 or 572-3595
wcenter@ncc.edu      www.ncc.edu/writingcenter

Saturday, February 4:
On Monday, January 30, I assigned Homework (Introductions and Conclusions) that was to be submitted on Wednesday, February 1. Since I did not remind students to hand it on, only four students even bothered to ask me about it after class. Consequently, you may hand it in for credit with no penalty on Monday, February 6.

Thursday, February 2:
In addition to the assigned readings for Monday (“Describing,” pages 399–407 in Bullock, and Wells, “A Riddle Wrapped in a Tortilla (Restaurant Review: Javelina in Gramercy Park),” the handout), do not forget to complete the online readings and Online Exercises.

In The Norton Online Handbook read “Complete Sentences,” “Fragments,” and “Comma Splices and Fused Sentences” (Norton S-1, 2, and 3).
(
Use the icon at the bottom left to display the Table of Contents.)

After you have completed the reading, click on and complete each of the following multiple-choice exercises:

Sentence Elements

Clauses

Phrases

Identifying Fragments

Editing Fragments

Comma Splices and Fused Sentences

Editing Comma Splices and Fused Sentences.

For each, be sure to select ten questions, not five, and review carefully if you get a question wrong.
If you score 8, 9, or 10 out of 10 (80% or better), submit your scores; otherwise, reread the material and try again.
Be sure to include your full name, section (GA) and my correct email: Brian.Murphy@NCC.edu.

Sunday, January 29:
In addition to the assigned readings for tomorrow, we will discuss The Norton Online Handbook and Online Exercises.

Friday, January 26:
I have posted the following additional Extra Credit opportunities on the main page:

Academic Success Workshops and Learning Skills Workshops (1 point each)
NCC Center for Educational and Retention Counseling

Academic Success Workshops

It's “About Time”: Managing Time, Self, & College
February 7, 11:30am - 12:45pm - M206
February 14, 11:30am - 12:45pm - M206

Being Successful in an Online Class
March 23, 11:30am -12:45pm - G149

Learning Skills Workshops
(It is recommended that students attend all four of the following)

  1. Listening/Note-Taking
    March 7, 11:30am - 12:45pm Bldg. M206

  2. Studying and Organizing For Classes 
    March 14, 11:30am - 12:45pm Bldg. M206

  3. Reading College Textbooks
    March 21, 11:30am - 12:45pm Bldg. M206

  4. Test-Taking
    March 28, 11:30am - 12:45pm Bldg. M206

  5. Managing Test Anxiety
    April 18, 11:30am - 12:45pm Bldg. M206
    April 25, 11:30am - 12:45pm Bldg. M20

For questions, call 516-572-7141
CERC Office, Nassau Hall, M19

If students attend one or more Extra Credit events and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), they can receive additional points, usually one or two (1-2) points extra credit.

Wednesday, January 24:
Be sure to read Writing in Academic Contexts,”  “Rhetorical Situations” (Bullock 1-9, 55-70); “Generating Ideas and Text” and “Drafting” (Bullock 289-300), as per the syllabus. We will discuss the writing process and techniques for beginning writing assignments.

In addition, I have managed to secure a room change. We will be meeting in South Hall beginning tomorrow: in South 109 on Mondays, and South 110 on Wednesdays. Room change signs will also be posted, in case you forget.

Finally, if you were absent on Monday and did not complete the diagnostic essay, you may write it tonight and bring it to class tomorrow. As you are not writing it in class, it should be typed (12-point Times New Roman), double spaced; include your name, course and section, instructor, and date in the upper left corner. Select one of the following topics, and compose a formal essay. Your essay will not receive a grade, nor will it affect your final average; this is for evaluative purposes only. You should take approximately one hour to complete this essay; do not use more than 75 minutes, the total length of the class period.. (Use of “I” is allowed for all three choices.)

1. What is your favorite text—however you may define the term “text” (novel, short story, graphic novel, and so on)—or who is your favorite author, and why? Defend your choice with specific examples.

2. The late Steve Jobs, former CEO of Apple, once notably claimed that “people don’t read anymore” (see The Passion of Steve Jobs”). Was he correct? Consider: With radio, television, cable, personal computers, smart phones, web-books, and tablets, we are living in a post-literate world, one in which people merely skim, browse, or surf rather than engaging in deep, meaningful reading for any prolonged periods of time. That is, sustained, concentrated reading*—for pleasure or for knowledge—is no longer necessary or important. Do you agree or disagree? Why or why not?

3.  Why are you here? That is, what is your objective or goal? How do you anticipate achieving it, and how will this class, or your education at Nassau Community College, help you to achieve this goal?

Thursday, January 19:
As previously announced and as per the syllabus, on Monday, January 23, students will write an essay in class for diagnostic purposes only. This is both to establish a baseline for your writing, against which to measure your progress, and to determine what each individual's students strengths and weaknesses might be. You do not need to bring anything except pens (blue or black ballpoint) and notepaper; if you do not have notepaper, bluebooks will be provided.

For Wednesday, January 25, be sure to read Writing in Academic Contexts,”  “Rhetorical Situations” (Bullock 1-9, 55-70); “Generating Ideas and Text” and “Drafting” (Bullock 289-300), as per the syllabus.

Finally, I have managed to secure a room change. Starting on Wednesday, January 25, we will meet in South Hall, in room 109, I believe. Room change signs will be posted, and the information will also be posted here..

Wednesday, January 18:
I have posted the first Extra Credit opportunity on the main page:

Introduction to Blackboard

The Office of Distance Education is holding on-campus open
demonstrations for students in G Building, Room 149:

Thursday, January 19, 2:30–3:45 pm

Friday, January 20, 2:003:15 pm

Monday, January 23, 3:304:45 pm

Tuesday, January 24, 11:30 am12:45 pm

No sign-up needed! First-come-first-serve basis!

For questions, please call the Office of Distance Education

516.572.7883

If students attend one or more Extra Credit events and provide evidence of attendance (ticket stub, program, unretouched digital image, et cetera) along with a typed one- to two-page personal response (review, analysis, reflection, critique, et cetera), they can receive additional points: a single event and written response is usually worth two (2) points extra credit; attendance at additional events will earn one or two (12) additional points each.

Also, because today is the anniversary of the day in 1778 when English navigator Captain James Cook reached Hawaii, the first European to do so, the first three students to email me a picture of Hawaii, Captain Cook, or some related image will receive one bonus point. This offer expires Friday, January 20 at midnight.

Monday, January 16:
The main page and syllabus have both been updated for the Spring 2017 semester.
Classes begin tomorrow, Tuesday, January 17; our first meeting is at 11:00 on Wednesday, January 18 in North Hall, Room 119.

Tuesday, January 10:
Due to last minute schedule changes, I have just been assigned this course.
The main page and syllabus will be updated before the start of the Spring 2017 semester.

 

 

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